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Reply To: College nerves

Buddy
Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

As both the other posts said, it probably will be harder on you than your horse. If you can take your own trailer and have it there for the flexibility, than that would be better as your horse is familiar with it. If it is a long trip, consider layovers or having a reputable shipping company transport him/her. Always use travel bandages or boots. Which ever college you are going to has done this year after year with horses coming and going with new and returning students. They will be able to “introduce” your horse into the new herd with as little stress as possible. Try to relax and be there for him at the beginning as he will be making the adjustment too, so you can both help each other through the transition. You will find that you make new friends and will be able to balance your classes, friends and horse once you get into a routine. You will possibly find that your new friends are also those who love horses, which will be great and you won’t have to do as much balancing with time manage.
Try to take the stuff your horse is used to and comfortable with for example, rugs, buckets, headcollar, lead rope etc, don’t go buy all new, the facility will supply a lot of that stuff. Take a supply of the hard feed (grain) that he/she is on and a supply of hay from where he/she is now so that you can make the transition to the new hay/feed less drastic on his system. You may want to take some large containers of water that he has at his current stable and mix it with the new water — they do not all taste the same. If he/she is generally a stress horse or may have ulsers, you might consider starting him/her on UlcerGaurd or something to coat and protect the GI tract. This can be started a couple days before you transport him and then continue for 5-7 days post arrival depending on how he/she is adjusting. You may consider some electrolytes to encourage drinking to assist with keeping him/her hydrated, also start this before you leave. Since you see him/her almost everyday, you know the normal behavior and his/her habits, so you will be able to make sure that he/she is doing all the normal things like eating, drinking, peeing, pooping, loving, annoyed, aggressive, calm, hyper etc….all those things that you have already figured out is his/her “normal” behavior. Good Luck and have FUN — this is a GREAT time in your life.

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