aclimatizing after importation

This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • Nellphoenix Original Poster Nellphoenix
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    hi I am about to move from the UK to Wyoming with my warmbloods and am looking for info about acclimatizing them to altitude, how to feed them after quarantine and where to bulk buy feed.

    any help appreciated

    Nell

    Built for life

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Welcome to the USA horse world. I am based in Michigan, but I did bring a Selle Francais gelding back with me when I returned to the US from Euorpe after spending the 70’s working for a US based company. Obviously, a lot has changed since then, and much of my info is more applicable to Michigan than to Wyoming, but some of it might be useful.

    Most rural areas will have some type of feed store, usually with a good range of feeds. There also the big chains like “Tractor Supply”, which in spite of the name carries feeds for most farm animals from chickens to horses. And food for dogs & cats, kitty litter, bowls, etc. And they have an on-line store if you don’t have one in your area. Are you looking for a source for anything in particular?

    Perhaps if you tell us a bit more about your horses and your riding choice (western, hunt seat, dressage) and which part of Wyoming you will be moving to, we can be more helpful with specifics.

    Nellphoenix Original Poster Nellphoenix
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Hi
    I have 3 horses all geldings. Rio is a 16.2hh 10 year old PSG school master, Fly is 16.3hh 11 year old 1.4m jumper and Al is a 16.2hh 10 year old CIC 2* eventer. They are coming from basically sea level to live on a ranch at 6,500 feet above sea level in Central Wyoming, so I am worried about getting them working again without doing any damage to them. Anyone got any ideas for a training schedule that works for this kind of thing? I have also heard that horses coming out of quarantine need a few weeks to recover but not sure if this is true.

    I am going to have to get them onto completely new diets as I cant find their food in the USA anywhere. When in quarantine all they get is hay and water. Can you give me the names of some good quality feed manufactures so that I can make a start to trying to find feed that is comparable in values etc.

    I was just getting ready to compete in the UK when this opportunity to move came up but cant wait to get competing over there.

    Built for life

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Welcome, Nell! I wish I had answers for you, but I don’t. Adjusting to high altitudes is hard for some people, let alone horses. I don’t know where in the UK you’re coming from, but don’t they have mountains there? What I’m getting at is, ask your veterinarian for guidance. Isn’t Guelph in the UK somewhere? And doesn’t it have a vet school? Maybe, if your vet is unable to tell you, you could contact someone there.

    You may be overwhelmed by just how many feed manufacturers we have here. Some are better than others. Purina is one that comes to mind–I think technically they’re Ralston-Purina. A good company–I use their products–rats. Brain fade. Their motto is “Forage First,” but I’ll have to check the feed bag. Alliance, maybe? I’ll add it in a later post.

    I hope others can help you with quarantine because I can’t!

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    OK, I’m back. I have a trail horse, so I feed top-quality hay rather than grain. But there’s one product I used to fatten up an underweight mare, and the company that puts it out is ADM Alliance Nutrition–and they do stress “forage first,” meaning hay first, before grain or grain-based supplements. Do you feed lucerne (that may not be the correct spelling) in the UK? Here it’s called alfalfa, and some competitors swear by it for their competition horses. Others prefer timothy hay, plus a grain-based supplement fed with both.

    I’m stressing this because feed is something else you should talk about with a veterinarian.

    And, speaking of veterinarians, Colorado has a vet school, Colorado State University. I think someone there would be in a better position to advise you about acclimating to high altitude, post-quarantine care, and differences in feed than a vet in the UK. But of course that’s your choice. Here’s the website. Click on it and you’ll see phone numbers. I’m sure you can find email addresses if you dig deep enough:
    http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/vth/Pages/default.aspx

    Good luck to you and your horses!

    Nellphoenix Original Poster Nellphoenix
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    thanks for all the help. My boys cost me a lot of money to buy and I had to wait nearly 40 years to get them ( yes I will be competing in the “older” AO classes lol). My vet here wasn’t much help so I will contact Colorado and see if they can help any.

    the boys are on timothy hay just now so I will have to look for a supplier in Wyoming unless I can persuade a “certain person” to grow it on his ranch wink wink lol.

    thanks again for all the help. and if anyone wants help with English riding, carriage driving or horse care just ask. over here I am a riding for the disabled riding and carriage driving instructor as well as a British horse society stage 2 groom. done a lot of dressage just getting back to jumping and now I have Al I am going to try eventing lol

    Built for life

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Dreams sometimes do come true, don’t they. The best of luck with your horses, and with eventing!

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    HI Nell! I, too, live in Wyoming–& have found Ranch Way Feeds out of Ft. Collins, Colorado to be quite good. (I like them better than Purina products & have better results putting/keeping weight on; just my personal experience) They are formulated for this western environment. There is lots of good, Wyoming grown grass & alfalfa hay in Wyoming; quite a bit of it gets shipped OUT of the state. Not knowing what part of Wy exactly you are/will be in, you may or not find Ranch Way Feeds locally. Depends on the size of your town. If you are in Cheyenne or Casper, you can probably get just about anything. Also-& you may already know this-be prepared to travel to show! ๐Ÿ™‚ Again-I guess it will depend on where in the state you are. Welcome to Wyoming–Spring arrives about mid-late May! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Nellphoenix Original Poster Nellphoenix
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Hi

    going to be about 20 miles outside of Casper. how do you find exercising horses at altitude? anything different that at sea level? do you know any horse associations in Wyoming that offer competitions?

    Built for life

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    Hi Nell-
    I am 2 hours west of Casper. ๐Ÿ™‚
    I have lived in the western US for the last 35 years-1st in the Denver, Colorado area (also high altitude) & now Wyoming. Not ever having moved a horse from sea level to high altitude, I would suggest, as far as exercising at this high altitude, that you give them LOTS of time to acclimate. Start slow & let them work their lungs into shape. Lots of walk/trot I would imagine. The air is quite thin compared to sea level; of course-unless you have an indoor arena, the ground/weather doesn’t usually clear up until May/June anyways. If your horses are here already, that should give them time to get used to the ‘thin air’.

    Being outside of Casper, you will have access to some decent sized feed stores. I *think* there is even an English tack store in Casper, although I have never been to it. I ride H/J, & was a little saddened upon moving here from Denver at the lack of show/hunt pace opportunities for English riding. (not really even schooling shows in my area & I don’t want to drive hours to show in 2-3 classes.) Of course, I am in a MUCH smaller town than Casper, so perhaps you will be situated in a part of the state that actually supports English disciplines a little better. I know there is a cross country course outside of Casper (or used to be); I will try & find the name of it for you. Also, you will be near Douglas which is where the Wyoming State Fair is held every year & they have quite a lovely equestrian facility that may host shows/clinics/etc. As far as associations in Wyoming—I don’t know of any-I will see if I can locate some for you. This is “cowboy Rodeo country”—& if I had to guess, it will be interesting for you to see the differing thoughts on horse care here vs the UK.

    When will you & your horses be arriving? If you have Warmbloods–be prepared to hear this A LOT—“WOW-your horses are BIG!” ๐Ÿ™‚ (I have a leggy, fine boned thoroughbred & I take this comment as a compliment!-although I have had people ask me if she is just a really tall quarter horse….) Please feel free to ask me anything you are wondering about & I will try to answer as best I can. If you would rather email, just let me know & I will provide you with my email address. I hope your move goes smoothly!

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    This is the link to the Mountain States Eventing Association Chapter. They don’t have a 2015 calender on line yet, but hopefully they are planning things for this summer.
    http://www.msea-area9.org/MSEA/Chapters

    This is a link to a boarding facility outside of Casper that actually has English instruction! You might contact them for any ideas on shows, associations, etc.
    http://platteridgewy.com/

    I can’t find info on the cross country course just outside of Casper-but the boarding facility probably knows about it. I think it is called Three Trails Cross Country Course, & I know 2 summers ago they did some shows.

    Hope this helps! ๐Ÿ™‚
    Just had another thought—if you can’t find much in Wyoming, you are about a 3 hour drive from Northern Colorado & there is lots of showing, eventing, etc going on there.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider. Reason: added more info
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider. Reason: more stuff!
    Nellphoenix Original Poster Nellphoenix
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Hi
    we should be moving within the next couple of months just trying to get all the red tape dealt with regarding green cards etc. I have 3 boys all about 16.2/3hh that I got from Germany as schoolmasters for dressage and sj/eventing. going to have to dig out someplace to get a decent novice friendly ranch horse or two lol not ridden western for about 12 years!
    the ranch has an indoor school, but I will be adding another just for my boys and I will be bringing my jumps with me since I cant find anywhere decent to get them in USA since they are FEI standard. once I get over there will drop you a message with my email.

    Built for life

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    That sounds good-to be arriving in the summer rather than winter. Our summers are hot & dry, so take that into account when acclimating your boys. Loads of water & Electrolytes for everyone! ๐Ÿ™‚

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider. Reason: wrong word used
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