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Bareback Mounting

This topic contains 11 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  ondine 3 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • naturalpasture Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    I am trying to learn how to swing up onto my horse bareback so I don’t have to stand on something every time. (If I’m out riding and need to dismount, I don’t want to have to find a stump or something to be able to re-mount.) My horse is about 14.2 hands and I’m 5’1″.

    The second time I tried to swing up I made it all the way up with no scrambling at all. I’ve tried to do this about 15 times since then and can’t seem to be able to do it (either side). In fact, I am actually getting worse as I can’t even seem to get my hips even halfway up and I end up just sliding back down! :(

    Does anyone have any ideas for me? I would like to be able to do this on taller horses as well, since I have another horse that is about 16 hands and another that is about 17.1 hands. Or does anyone know of another method that might work better for me?

    maddyhorsey
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 12

    Maybe if you stretch your hip flexors regularly it will be easier to get your leg around.

    naturalpasture Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    Actually, getting my leg up and over is not the problem. :) It’s getting the rest of my body (mainly my hips) up and over. Maybe I just don’t know how do to it right. :-) Have any other ideas?

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    Fun for you! I have never been able to do this–even in my younger, more flexible, leaner High School days. :) But, watching people do it-it seems like they use a lot of upper body strength to pull their torso/hips up & over. Just my observation….good luck!

    ottbrider ottbrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 33

    You could teach your horses to bow. Technically we shouldn’t ride horses bareback, but even I do it 😛 Anyway the easiest thing I could think of is teaching them to bow. All my horses know how to for the sole fact of getting on bareback. Our smallest horse, an Arabian, is 15.3hh, the second smallest, a Thoroughbred, is 16.2-16.3hh, my tallest horse, another Thoroughbred, is 18hh! And I’m barely 5’2 so swinging on is not and option for me..

    No horse is incapable of learning- riders are just incapable of teaching

    Levans
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Watch some You Tube videos on out-riders for wagon races. This will give you a model to follow

    naturalpasture Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    Team Buttercup, just wondering why are we not supposed to ride bareback?

    ottbrider ottbrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 33

    Well, it’s really bad for their backs. When you sit bareback, you’re right ontop of their spine and all your weight is on one point of their back. A saddle is built to (1) sit on either side of the spine, not directly ontop and (2) spread out the weight on their back so it’s not directly on one point for long periods of time. Short rides (30 minutes or less) from point a to point b tend to be ok, but long periods of time (hours) are damaging and can cause back soreness.

    No horse is incapable of learning- riders are just incapable of teaching

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Back in my childhood when I rarely rode with a saddle (I’d get caught sneaking out of chores if I stopped to saddle my horse) I would stand the the side of the horse, then jump up, boosting my body flat on the horse’s back (my stomach to her spine), grab the offside mane, and then swing my leg over. That worked even when I was just a shrimp. My brother on the other hand approached the horse running (his horse was far more sane than he was) from the left front, grabbed mane in his left hand and swung himself up and over, he also could jump up from the back, putting two hands on the croup like the ‘horse’ in gym class. Proof positive that horses are more generous with children…

    Then as a teenager I had a 17.1hh TWH/thoroughbred cross that would park out (front legs go forward, rear legs stationary) until I could boost myself on. I never did that swing up thing, figured I’d probably just swing on over and land on the other side.

    Nowadays (some forty years later) I never ride bareback, and studiously use a mounting block even on short horses – to spare their backs and mine.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    naturalpasture Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    My rides are usually about 15 to 20 minutes. So it probably isn’t a big deal for me. This article is interesting too.
    http://www.equisearch.com/horses_care/health/the-biomechanics-of-riding-bareback/

    Rhinestone Cowgirl Rhinestone Cowgirl
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 20

    There are a couple different ways to do bareback mounting. I use the move where you take hold of the mane in left hand and stand at the shoulder, but facing almost completely away from the horse, where my back is toward her. This enables you to get a little “running start.” Take a quick step with right leg as if you are turning around quickly toward horse to gain momentum, bounce on left leg to swing right leg over. It’s basically a vaulting move, and works better for me than the face-the-horse-and-jump-on-back move. However, I am 5’9″, so since you are 5’1′, it’s definitely more of a challenge, and it may also require you to gain a little more strength. But with practice you should be able to find the technique that works for you.

    Western Pleasure, Hunter/Jumper, Working Cow...there's an App for that!

    ondine
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    The important thing to remember when swinging up is to keep your head down. That’s probably why you can’t get your hips high enough. If you keep your head down your butt will go up.

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