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Bit help, please!

This topic contains 42 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  G & S 2 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 31 through 43 (of 43 total)
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  • cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Joe-Joe, on the chute: Are they not absolutely awesome? I wish every hunter/jumper barn should have one!

    Having learned to jump in a chute, nearly always rein-less and stirrup-less, and on occasion with a saddle and a breastplate – no girth, I think every hunter/jumper barn should.

    I went to a George Morris clinic. The crest release he sired was several years old and I think he was at that point of realization that it had been blown all out of advantageous use. Trainers were using the crest release to teach jumping, rather than teaching their rider to balance correctly.

    I had never learned a crest release, rather I’d taught to balance deep through my heels, folding at the hips, jumping with no rein or stirrup. I obviously had NO crest release. There was a wrathful explosion of verbiage, starting with:
    “And THIS child has OBVIOUSLY never had a REAL jumping lesson in her LIFE! There is no balancing on the crest! There is no standing on her toes. And look where her hands are!!! On either side of the horse’s NECK!!!! What is that???”
    It wasn’t until the end of the day’s work that he approached me to tell me that he hoped I understood he was being sarcastic, and that while he had swapped nearly every other rider on other’s horses, but not me was not because he felt me incompetent, but because my horse was the only horse in a snaffle (hollow mouth egg butt snaffle), and it did not appear that anyone understood how to actually ride in a snaffle.
    As he put it: Americans are not to the snaffle born.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Cheryl – great story. He was a terror, wasn’t he? I can jump with or without a crest release (and always used a snaffle except in the hunt field), depending on the horse. And everyone should have a chute available (ours was only three jumps) AND learn to ride at least without a saddle. Even my lunatic dragon killer can be ridden back out to his field with just a halter and lead, as well as in the ring.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    ]Should have stuck with bareback

    I suppose you could teach them to drive without harness, but carts don’t learn new tricks easily. However do you transport all that? Semi?

    It is never the horse's fault

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    I had to purchase a different trailer – the 2-horse straight load, bumper pull wasn’t big enough, except for the minis and the HyperBike, which breaks down and could go in the under the feeder tack compartment.

    I got a 3-horse slant with dressing room – also a bumper pull. Then had to get a bigger truck to pull it with. Now trying to figure out how to get either a pony sized marathon carriage and pony in, OR 2 minis and a mini marathon carriage. The dressing room has a swinging saddle rack, loaded with dressage and jumping saddles, and pony harness. Blanket bar holds 2 hanging harness bar with pairs harness and 2 singles harness.

    Working on a winch now for the carriages.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Sounds like a nice rig. But, I still vote for the semi!

    It is never the horse's fault

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Yeah, me too

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    If I am remembering correctly, most double jointed bits are legal for dressage, but Dr. Bristol double jointed bits are not.

    You may wish to check the new FEI rules. They have made some very interesting additions to the banned bit list, including the Baucher and the Fullmer Full Cheek snaffle, the Dr. Bristol and some other centre link bits. Causing quite the row!

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 249

    I have not gotten around to the new regulations & tests yet. Are the newly banned bits banned at the FEI level or at all levels?

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    FEI level only. I was just surprised that two bits, Baucher and Fulmer, were newly banned after being near staples of the eventing field!

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    FEI level only. I was just surprised that two bits, Baucher and Fulmer, were newly banned after being near staples of the eventing field! I was VERY happy to see banning of Dr. Bristol and some of the other double jointed/centre link bits.

    I do speak to one of the Mylar bits worn by my combined driving VSE. He absolutely loves it, while the other equally passionately hates it. The horse who loves it, a stallion, was in a mullen when I got him. He would chronically back off the bit. In the Mylar snaffle, he is perfectly happy to hold the bit and carry it.

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    G&S and all interested, following is the list of bits in the new 2015 FEI eventing section:
    https://www.fei.org/sites/default/files/2015%20Eventing%20Rules%2030%20March2015%20with%20markup.pdf

    You will need to scroll down to about page 74 in the Annex.
    Again, this is for eventing dressage. The changes have started quite a row amongst competitors as many of the bits now banned have been standards for some years. Some of the banned bits make perfect sense; some not at all!

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    I do speak to one of the Mylar

    I have a correction here. The bit is a MYLER Comfort snaffle.
    The bit is a #2 and the shank is a #10. I buckle the rein around the large loop, where there is no poll action.

    The shank is designed so the rein may be attached in one of three places, allowing for more or less action on bars, lips or poll. I have seen a curb strap placed in the upper (cheekpiece) ring. Buckling the rein in the largest area allows the bit to work in the “softest manner” on the lips and tongue. Since there is a centre piece and the bars on each side are curved, my horse likes to carry the bit – and himself – freely and confidently through the dressage, cones and marathon/hazards phases. His mouth is very soft, and the bit can be used with new/learning drivers under supervision.
    Unfortunately, the bit can be abused very easily, so care must be taken not to twist the bit when hanging it.

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    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 249

    Ahhhhh! Eventing dressage, not dressage dressage. Many thanks for the clarification. I would not have caught this change, as I don’t keep track of the eventing rules, but still interesting to know. I can imagine the shock & horror on the part of eventing competitors. I suspect that at least some of these bits now banned for eventing dressage phase had already been banned from dressage dressage.

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