Bolting

This topic contains 15 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 2 years, 6 months ago.

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  • Rockin’ Roxi Rockin' Roxi
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    How do y’all keep your horse from Bolting..whether I’m taking her halter off releasing her into the pen..or out on to the pasture???… TIA.for your advice

    Don't cry that its over,.smile cause it happened

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    Yikes! I wish I had a good suggestion other than Please Be VERY careful! I have not had horses that do this, but I had a friend kicked in the face when she released her horse to turnout; he spun the second she had his halter off, nailed her in the face & took off. She had to have reconstructive surgery….Do you have access to a trainer or more experienced horse person that could assist or give you some ideas? I would guess you will be hearing from some others soon with (hopefully) some possible suggestions. Best of luck-don’t get hurt! ๐Ÿ™‚

    kelley_powell
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Thank you .She isn’t mean ..and doesn’t kick..I just wish she would slowly walk away…I have switched her from straight alfalfa to Hay grass had half a alfalfa we have cold winters were from so we had alfalfa for the winter so I know that makes her hot so hopefully the grass he will calm her down a bit and I’ve stopped giving grain as well. She s not a mean Horse by nature she just likes to go ..very very high spirited which is fine but when I’m releasing her i needing to break her of that and I’m not sure how to do that

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    Just had a thought-again, haven’t had horses that does this, so I don’t know if it would work. Rather than releasing her at the gate, walk her a little ways out into the field or her pen-make her walk nicely-not jigging-& then take her halter off. Just watch that she doesn’t throw up her heels in your direction–change the place in the field each time; sometimes walk her further out; just change it up each day so she perhaps doesn’t associate the “release” with the “spot”—?! I think if it were me, this is where I would start.

    Rockin’ Roxi Rockin' Roxi
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    That might help..thanks..I’ll gonna they it

    Don't cry that its over,.smile cause it happened

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Does she have acceptable manners in hand, other than when you let her go? Will she walk/trot politely when asked without dragging, pulling, rooting or rushing? Or is this just when she is released? A little less alfalfa and no grain (take care not to take away needed nutrients even tho grain is gone) can definitely help. Give her new diet a chance to kick in. Happy, healthy, lit up horses are hard to contain even tho we need to for safety and protocol around humans.

    Again, be very careful until this is managed a little better thru a trainer if you need one. In the meant time, as you turn her out, be sure to turn her toward the gate, tell her to stand/wait before you release so that she has to turn around/away before she can bolt. This will give you a split second to get outa the way; ) Lay the end of your lead over her neck behind her ears and grab the end so you have a back up communication line while taking her halter off, assuming you do. Remind her to stand/wait if you need to. Stay safe, don’t be afraid or feel silly to wear a helmet when you are turning her out. The condition of my mental status is far more important than someone’s opinion of my appearance. Helmets: not just for riding any more : ) I have worn my vest on occasion, too. No regrets. Still here, still independently able : )

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Rockin’ Roxi Rockin' Roxi
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    she does have some behavior problems let me let me start from the beginning we rescued her from going to a slaughter house and she’s been to three different homes and she’s 12 and retraining her to remember all the basics of lunging and so forth she has been ridden and she is rideable just she is more for an or intermediate rider so not knowing her background she has a lot of bad habits from what we figured she was started but never finished so therefore we’re trying to correct your bad habits and being that we haven’t had a horse in a long time we are new at this is well she is getting better as far as respect though I have been told she respect people more in the saddle but I’m earning her trust and work with her everyday and small changes to her behavior as much as putting in a pen with bags having a bottle with rocks in her making her mind so it’s a journey that I’m experiencing and she is too so I’m afraid to say lol I’ll probably be on here a lot from a bunch of advice from other people on how to handle certain subjects.

    Don't cry that its over,.smile cause it happened

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Welcome Rockin’ : )

    First and most seemingly petty, if you are going to post here often, and please do, we will help all we can : ), I respectfully ask that you use a little punctuation. Maybe just a period once in a while, ay? It will make reading your posts so much easier for The Old Ones here : ) Easier reads get more attention anyway so…

    Second and also important: A horse does not have to be mean to hurt you, far more accidents and injuries happen just cos we’re together. Rarely is mean involved. Fear is more often your obstacle/threat.

    You really need to find a trainour or instructour for a little while. Habits are easy to establish, hard to break. Training is similar: takes sometimes less than ten minutes to teach something, 2 seconds to destroy it, 6 months to get it back. Set the rules that you want her to follow as you are, be VERY consistent, use the same words and actions (body language and placement is everything) for what you want every time. The BEST assistance and advice I can give is for you to hopefully be able to connect with a more currently experienced horseman that can be right there with you. The internet is okay for ball park info and field conversations. An excellent tool for AFTER the fact. Actual training and especially behaviour modification require hands-on.

    One of the most difficult yet common things to manage with rescued horses is discipline. It is hard to “punish” one that has seen some of the horrific physical abuse that some have. But if lines aren’t drawn and kept, Horse loses in the long run. Again.

    Thank you for rescuing your girl, I hope this works out soon and safely for all, and that you are on to a fab Life of fun with her : D

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I make mine face the gate, then I remove their halters and give them a peppermint when I am on the other side of said gate. After that, they can do as they please, but they quickly learned to wait for that treat.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: typo

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Ahh. The proven and effective Joe-Joe method. Should be bottled : D

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    Ahhh, J-J, I love that idea of treating while on the OTHER side of the gate; I will tuck that little pearl away for future reference.

    And Rockin’: Yes to what Pheets said about working with a trainer; we can suggest ideas, but having a live person at your side will be most beneficial. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Welcome (back) to the wonderful world of horses!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Bribery just happens to work well for me, with one pig and one who is enjoying the new experience. I now have two horses who will watch me walk out to their fields and meet me at the gates. Much better than having to walk all over the planet to get them. And, if they will wait patiently (okay, not so patiently, expecially Joe Joe) for treats rather than bolting into the blue, well I prefer things that way. I don’t say it will work for every horse, but it is an easy fix when it does. If they don’t see me (Joe Joe is usually watching, just in case), they will come when called. It makes my life less complicated and uses less of my energy.

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Experience teaches us to pick and choose our battles. Warriours come in a wide variety of flavours. Not finding fault with you at all, Joe-Joe, just teasing you affectionately : ) Our little Black Mare can load just fine for a cookie. No cookie, lots of ‘tude. One cookie, no fight? I am ok with that. We accomplish what we want to within a reasonable time frame, get to where we want to go on time, and everybody happy and positive when we get there, and I don’t need an entourage…..change it why?

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Sort of like battles with teenagers – fashions change and hair will grow back – why waste time on them? Homework is quite another story.

    I tend to take the easiest way I can find to accomplish things. Example – my friend got a round bale which was absolutely squished in the bed of her truck. She and her husband (I merely watched them) struggled for half an hour trying to get it out. Finally, I suggested tying a rope to the bale and the other end to a tree, and just driving out from underneath it . Worked like a charm, and they thought it was brilliant. I just thought it was lazy.

    If treats work, and no one is endangered, why not use them? Like your mare – if a cookie gets her to stroll in, it would be silly not to use it.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: grammar

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Along the same line, natch : ), I am VERY good at what I do. I don’t WANT to have to do it over so I do it REALLYREALLYGOOD the first time. I am NOT lazy, just very efficient (insert Ara-Bean smirk here )..

    Well, she doesn’t exactly stroll in… yet, she balks, questions, tests and demands, the customary “i don’t have to” dance, but we beat her with a cookie and she falls for it almost every time. Have yet to spend any more than a few minutes loading her. Granted, she is young and has not traveled enough for me to expect her to be fluid about it just yet.. I am not one to judge a good or bad trainer by the amount of time it DOESN’T take to achieve an element, more interested in the horse’s attitude thru the process.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

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