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Boredom and Hay waste

This topic contains 20 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Joan Fry 2 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • anthony_tucker Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 7

    So….both of my older Arabians are in a area of about 80 x 60 feet. Is a hay bag better than a bucket to feed them? I usually give them 4 to 5 flakes each a day, along with grain.

    beth
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    I absolutely love the Freedom Feeder hay bag. It eliminates hay waste and it helps the horse to eat more slowly…it mimics natural grazing and keeps a smaller amount of food in the gut for longer periods- which is what you want to help prevent ulcers and colic.

    TheFoxRider
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 28

    Hay bags are great if you have the patience to fill them and hang them safely.

    My barn uses hay mangers in the stall and round bale feeders with slow feed nets over the round bales outside. The slow feeds cut down the waste to almost zero because they keep the horses from pulling hay out of the feeder and spreading it around/pooping on it. The mangers do a similar thing in the stalls.

    I know there are square bale feeders that are slow feed on the market which may be a good option for your Arabians. I would just make sure to put them in something or hang from a fence so there is less risk of a horse getting hung up on the net – especially if they wear shoes. I’ve heard of people who have barefoot horses putting the nets on the ground, but I would (knowing horses – they always get in to trouble!) secure the net into a feeder, bucket or other container. The nets keep them from eating their hay too quickly and getting bored and would cut down on waste.

    Visit my horse care and product review blog at: www.keepcalmhorsecare.blogspot.com

    anthony_tucker Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 7

    I will definitely try that. I am putting up a new “horse no climb” fence soon, so I can safely hang them from the fence. Currently, it is wasteful…because they pull the hay out and it gets all over the ground. I will look into getting two of them for my babies. Thank you!!

    TheFoxRider
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 28

    Good luck with them – I hope nets are a good solution for you! While I think it’s cute when I find my mare laying down in her hay and munching or doing other cute hay related things, I feel much better knowing that she’s eating clean hay AND not wasting any precious hay. It’s too expensive to sleep on!

    Visit my horse care and product review blog at: www.keepcalmhorsecare.blogspot.com

    anthony_tucker Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 7

    Although, mine do not have an actual barn yet, they do lay around in the dirt or when I get them wet…then they roll around in the dirt. Will be building them shelter this fall.

    TheFoxRider
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 28

    I’m sure they’ll appreciate the shelter! My OTTB is my main hay waster – she picks through and spreads out a pile, and uses what she deems “unedible” as bedding – usually because it’s dirty from getting spread out in the stall or dusty from being on the ground. Feeders and nets had worked really well for her. My other mare isn’t a pig, but isn’t smart enough to not poop where she eats – her pasture mates appear to enjoy throwing hay, because there is a 3 foot ring around the round bale feeder of discarded hay. Drives me nuts – if I was the barn owner, all of the pastures would have slow feet nets on the bales!

    Visit my horse care and product review blog at: www.keepcalmhorsecare.blogspot.com

    anthony_tucker Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 7

    My Mare is the hay thrower, but then will go back and eat it later. I know this is off the subject…but do you know anything about Freeze Brands? My Mare has one on her neck and I am not sure of what it means other than she is an Arabian and was a show horse. Thank you!!!

    TheFoxRider
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 28

    Hey, it’s your topic- go off subject as you will! I rode Arabians before I swapped to Eventing – freeze brands are used to ID horses (especially show horses) like tatoos are used on racing thoroughbreds. I’m guessing the freeze brand will indicate her identity and would be useful should she ever be stolen or go missing during a disaster. I think they’re readable if you shave the patch down – but I would ask the previous owner about it before I took off any hair (why remove it when you don’t have too?). Mustangs also have freeze brands as well, which usually indicate where they came from and when they were rounded up (a traceable record of “who they are” so to speak).

    Visit my horse care and product review blog at: www.keepcalmhorsecare.blogspot.com

    anthony_tucker Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 7

    Just curious…won’t be shaving anything off. She is a precious thing, and it is really cool knowing that she was a show horse.

    TheFoxRider
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 28

    I do the same thing with my mares – I have tracked their pedigrees and have found pictures and videos of siblings, aunts and other relatives – it’s very cool!

    Visit my horse care and product review blog at: www.keepcalmhorsecare.blogspot.com

    Leslie Leslie
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 44

    I like the slow feed hay bags because then you can make sure there is hay in front of them at all times – helps prevent ulcers, colic, and boredom.

    I would recommend a ground hay feeder, though. Eating up high is not a natural position for them to eat and can cause a few problems with time. Their teeth won’t wear the same way as when they are chewing with their heads down – so might mean the dentist needs to come more often. One of the horses at the barn I used to work at had hay bags because he was very susceptible to colic – and last year he was diagnosed with neck arthritis. The vet mentioned constantly eating up high and having to contort his neck/head in an unnatural position could have contributed.

    I also recommend ones with wider netting (such as the Nibble Nets) rather than the thin netting – I read a story once about a horse getting it’s tooth caught in the thin netting. Obviously this is not a common occurrence, but it would be awful if it did happen!

    Not all the hay bags can just be thrown on the ground though – look for one that is specifically made for that purpose. There are a lot of home-made options as well.

    www.createdbyleslie.com - handmade custom wood-burned brushes, stall signs, & portraits, etched glasses, and custom stuffed ponies

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    If you are worried about boredom, then yes I would be putting their hay in slow feed nets. That being said, you also need to make sure that they are not going longer than 4 hours without hay or you run the risk of them getting ulcers.

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

    anthony_tucker Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 7

    Wow…didn’t know that they could get ulcers like that. I usually feed them each 4 to 5 flakes a day…and grain.

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Yep unfortunately it is the case! That is why I *cringe* when I hear people say “My horse comes in at night and finishes his hay in 15 minutes.”

    I’d much, much, MUCH rather provide my horse with hay 24/7 and have to work him a little harder to make sure he doesn’t get to plump. :)

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

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