Join the conversation! Login or register to ask your question or help a fellow rider.
Call us 24/7 - 1-800-461-8898

Butterballs anonymous

This topic contains 32 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 2 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • JustDandy Original Poster JustDandy
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 0

    My mare – name withheld to protect her honor – gets fat on air. The barn only gives her a handful of grain to stop her from kicking down the barn at feeding time, but my vet still says she needs to lose weight. We do basic dressage three days a week, and she gets plenty of turnout in a group, so she should be moving around enough. Is there anything I can do to help her slim down? (Please don’t suggest a aqua-treadmill or hot walker – my barn does not have that kind of money!!)

    analise analise
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 10

    Is she turned out on grass? Maybe a grazing muzzle would help?

    Otherwise, even though you’re riding three days a week, maybe the intensity needs to be upped a bit if you can’t get out there more. :)

    thundervalley
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Hi there. Overweight horses are everywhere. I have 2 Morgans that are easy keepers and a half Arabian mare who has EMS (Equine Metabolic Syndrome). After 2 bouts of laminitis (one in the half Arabian, and another in the 16 yr old Morgan mare, I was told by my vet that I HAD to get some weight off them. My 14.3 16 yo Morgan was 1100 lb, and my smaller 14.1 Morgan (15 yo)was 975 lb. The Arabian was 15.3 and over 900 lb. Not a lot overweight but but she is the one who had a solor abcess and BAD laminitis. I was told to soak her hay (at least 90% of it 20-30 min) and add Thyrol L to her feed 2x a day. I did the same routine for the bigger Morgan. Since April the Arabian has lost over 150 LB and the smaller Morgan has lost 138 pounds (no Thyro L), and the Half Arab has lost over 100 pounds.The Morgans get 1 hr turnout in am and 1 hr in pm on grass. The EMS mare gets only a few mouthfuls. I try to ride them 1/2 hr each 2-3x a week.More turnout will come in winter when no grass. Lunge when possible, when riding is out. It worked for me..no more crests either.

    thundervalley
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    I forgot to add that Equine Specialty Hospital in Ohio specified using only FIRST cut timothy hay. No 2nd cut hay, no alfalfa. If anyone has had sucess with grazing muzzles please tell me how you got the horse to use it. Mine runs and runs, which is what we don”t want while her laminitis is healing.

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    I have two horses that could use a little Weight Watchers, but one in particular worried me when he suddenly packed on a couple of hundred pounds after a change in the herd structure. I cut his grain to a handful of the lowest-cal stuff I could find, and I bought a slow-feed hay net. I had to try several before I found one slow enough to keep him busy all night when he was in his stall (which unfortunately isn’t often) with just two or three flakes of hay. Muzzles haven’t worked for my guys. One has small ears and no way I attach the muzzle keeps it on when he wants it off. The other spends an hour working on getting it off, meanwhile rubbing his face raw. But that’s just my horses. I’ve seen others have great results.

    I hope you find a successful solution. This is a bear of a problem!

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
    Horses In the Yard

    CLW
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 12

    I have used slow feed hay nets for years and my two teenage Morgan geldings have only gotten better at getting the hay out of the slow feed nets. I need to add that the slow feed nets from SmartPak are really nice. Up until this year my horses have got so efficient at emptying the hay nets that I have layered them together. First starting out with two now we are up to three. I have put them together on a single draw string for the ease of use, but I want to find a different style of slow feeder that brings movement in to my horses lives while eating. I saw a slow feeder called “Port-a-Grazer” does anyone out there have any experience with this slow feeder?

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    What kind of hay is she eating and how much in pounds?

    What is her turnout situation like?

    I’d be looking to either get a muzzle for her or start working her harder!

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    Ah, CLW, my heart goes out to you! LOL You have Morgans! They’re my favorite animal, and ours was worthy of accolades. But they can figure out any problem faster than you can buy new hay nets. I never would have thought of layering them. That’s a great idea! Can’t help with the Port-a-grazer. I did find a solid nylon bag for my worst offender. It has just one small window of slow-feed web on one side. He spends a lot of time bouncing it off the wall, but it’s held up better than most other options and is easier to fill than the nets my other guys are using. Still, a determined horse (our Morgan removed all the bolts from the gutter over his shedrow barn until the gutter fell off, just because he was bored) will find a way around our best plans.

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
    Horses In the Yard

    CLW
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 12

    Greetings GHFrider, we who enjoy the Morgan breed stand proud and embrace our daily challenges of being out smarted by our equines. Don’t cha’ just love that look on their faces when they have gotten it all figured out and sometimes all taken apart. Proud of their accomplishments! That expression that says “Did you see that? My latest greatest new trick”
    Check out the “Porta-Grazer” at http://www.porta-grazer.com ,I would be interested to hear your thoughts about it. If it delivers what it claims, we are going to have a whole new brain game out in our dry lots. Since my geldings have become so skilled with the slow feed hay nets, they are overdue for a totally new challenge. It is not an inexpensive feeder, but when you compare it to the money I have spent on the number of hay nets I have went through, it’s going to pay for its self quicker than you think. I have ordered one to try and it is suppose to arrive on Monday….If you or anyone else cares to hear about how our experience goes with it, I will share if asked.
    Thanks for sharing your thoughts and advice
    CLW

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    ‘Morning, CLW. :)

    Yes, the Morgans are about as sneaky and funny as a horse can be and still live. LOL My daughter’s grandfather (I disowned him at that point) bought her a Morgan yearling when she was 12. There followed 16 years of hilarity. The story I’ve told to death about them involves walking into the barn to hear “smack! Stop touching me!” He’d keep just his whiskers on her arm or neck while she groomed and seemed delighted when he’d get a rise out of her. Sometimes they’d both be standing still and she’d reach out and give him a gentle smack. I’d say, “What was that for?”, and she’d say, “He knows what he was doing even if we don’t.” Everyone loved him and he loved everyone who laughed at his jokes.

    I looked at the grazer, and my first reaction (I don’t have Morgans now, more’s the pity) was that Zip, my big Paint, would have that sucker all over the pasture in minutes. He likes to tip over and drag the 100-gallon water trough so I can see from the window of the house when it’s empty. The grazer would have to be staked to the ground with a concrete chunk buried to hold it for it to still be in place. It has handles. ‘Nuff said. LOL I’ve seen similar, heavier, more expensive versions that might work better with tricky horses, but I wonder about how easy they are to clean. I hate the dust and hay fines that accumulate at the bottom of most feeders.

    Let me know how it goes, though. It could be the answer to a lot of owners’ prayers.

    JMF

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
    Horses In the Yard

    CLW
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 12

    Hello again GHFrider,
    Thanks for taking the time to check out the porta-grazer. I hope your observation of it accumulating a lot of miles is exactly what happens. I want them on the move! They spend way to much time standing behind the barn parked in front of a slow feed hay net. Being of hard plastic/Poly it will be easy to scrub and all the action it will see should dust out all the loose fines before they accumulate. I can only for see me tethering it behind the barn, under the over hang in really rainy, nasty, muddy weather. I am eager for it to arrive for us give it the Morgan test!
    I love your tales of the past while owning your Morgan. Thank you so much for sharing the chuckles…

    Take care
    CLW

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    Do keep me posted on how the contraption works for you. I’m curious as heck as to whether it will stand up to being tossed around by the handles. LOL

    Believe it or not, a story about that Morgan is the lead story in an anthology called The Healing Touch of Horses. I know, I know…it’s hard to imagine Peck’s Bad Boy healing anything other than his own wounds. LOL But he really was a very special horse. The story was picked up by Weekly Reader, and one class wrote me a letter asking about the horse (his name was The Rat…another story unto itself!). Sadly, he’d died just before I got the letter. They were mostly curious about my daughter’s illness (yet another story unrelated to horses except through The Rat, but they were very sad when I told them he was gone. He’s had a starring role in all four of my books and a few more of my stories. The plan had always been that he would come back here to the farm to retire and be my buddy, but it wasn’t to be. He was an old-style UVM Morgan. They’re rare around here now.

    Nice chatting with you! I’m sure we’ll cross paths again on this BB.

    JMF

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
    Horses In the Yard

    Leukrider Leukrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    Gosh, you guys have “skinny” Morgans compared to my Morgan/Friesian cross who, at 15 hands, weighs in at 1260 pounds. His weight is causing his loose stifle issue to become worse – not only is it taxing the joint, he now has to literally swing his stifles even more outward moving forward to accommodate the belly. Keeping him stalled during the day makes his stifle issues worse, and since he’s Morgan – enough said about keeping a grazing muzzle on. Getting him fit is a challenge as well because his stamina is incredible. He’s on a small amount of low-starch vitamin supplement to balance his ration and minimal hay. Unfortunately, rain has been abundant this year so my small acreage is lush.

    Leuk's Partner

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    Yeah, you’ve got a chunk! LOL Our Morgan was only 14.3 hh and had a butt as big as any QH. The old-style, “type-y” UVM Morgans tend towards heft, but he didn’t have any joint problems. I’m sorry to hear your boy is suffering a little. The stall-or-not-stall thing is always a dilemma. I’ve got two boys who puff up whenever they’re in for more than a couple of hours, and one of them is my current hefty boy. I sounds as if you’re doing the best you can under the circumstances. I do keep my big Paint on Recovery EQ Extra Strength because he tends toward soft-tissue injuries and puffing up doesn’t help that. It’s a never-ending battle!

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
    Horses In the Yard

    CLW
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 12

    Haaay! (lol) This is CLW the poster that acquired a porta-grazer XL for our two IR 17 yr. old Morgan geldings. We are a few days into using it, switching it back and forth between the two at feeding times that are in adjacent dry lots. This slow feeder is very tough heavy duty grade material. I am impressed with the quality and function of it. Both horses had it figured out in a nano second, how to operate it. They knock it over, stand it up, roll it around, stand it up again, spin the restriction tub to expose more strands of hay to graze. It has added a considerable amount of time to how long it takes for them to consume the same amount of hay that I am feeding from a tripled slow feed hay net. They are more relaxed and content because there tummies are happier. I gave it to the one that trashes his stall over night, last night, what a difference! Just a couple of piles along the back wall without all the stirring of the stall. I did tether it in the corner. The extra tiny fines that are left over from the hay accumulate along the outside edge around the inside of the bottom, unaccessible to the horse. I think I am going to order another one so they both have one all the time.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Healthy Horses  ❤  Happy Riders