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Calming Supplements.

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 2 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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  • jess_n_jazz Original Poster
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 15

    I am heavily considering getting a calming supplement for my horse. He is an appendix, 17 years old and has the energy of a 5 year old. I’ve had him since he was 2 and he’s been this way for as long as I can remember. I’ve looked into Divine Equine calming supplement, previously known as Calm n Cool. I would just like something that is going to make him less anxious while working him at home in the ring and for the next show season when we get back into barrel racing. He is a wonderful boy and gives you his all when he works, he just has all the stamina in the world and the more he works the more hot he gets (which is the thoroughbred in him obviously haha).

    I am wondering if I should only use the supplement on a “as needed” basis or if I should be adding it to his feed daily.

    I appreciate anyone’s input and suggestions :) thank you!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Things sold as supplements are generally intended to be given daily, so not sure that would be the way to go. What is your work regimen with him? Can you take him into the ring, walk and trot for about 15-20 minutes quietly and then just stop? Horses can easily get bored (mine) or anxious (not mine) if they follow a consistent work routine – variations on your theme are a good way to prevent that. As for shows, is barrel racing all you do? How is he in flat classes (I don’t know what type there might be for you other than pleasure horse)? Is it a financially viable option to go to a show and NOT show? Just ride him around the show ground and perhaps take him in the schooling ring? Some horses are just hotter than others, and there isn’t always anything much one can do about it. You could also try longeing him for about half an hour (or free Longe him for a shorter period of time, if you have a round pen in which to do it) to take off some of the edge. My own personal preference would be to avoid giving him something to make him quieter and rather work differently with him, to change his perception of what he should do and the manner in which he should do it. He is not too old to change – mine was 20 when I got him, and he has become a totally different horse with the change in expectations and training experience.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: wrong word

    It is never the horse's fault

    jess_n_jazz Original Poster
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 15

    bringing him to shows, and schooling has never been an issue with him. during the spring and summer we are usually at a show every weekend if not every other. he has been and competed in amateur as well as professional rodeos before and we do primarily barrel racing and gymkhana events. he is very well behaved for the most part except for the occasional bad days which every one has I’m sure. when I work with him at home I obviously don’t do barrels every time I get on him, I switch it up every time and do flat work days so he engages his hind end, bending exercises as well as ground poles from time to time to continue building up his back. he’s not hot all the time, only the times when I warm him up to practice barrels or pole bending which he LOVES. he has always been an extremely active horse since I day I got him, its just the thoroughbred in him which I’ve learned to accept and work WITH and not against. I am only looking into the calming supplement and they even have the liquid versions to use on an as needed basis and its to benefit him, to help him relax a bit more and not be so anxious before competing. I’ve never had him on any type of supplement or medications in the last 10 years because honestly he’s never really needed them.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    It really doesn’t sound to me as if he needs anything now, but of course I don’t know him and you do. Have you tried an MP3 player with seriously boring music? Or at least, tranquil. I have found that to be helpful with a lot of horses. The problem I perceive with a calming supplement is figuring out how much might be too much, which would be trial and error, and it is possible that an error could hurt you or your horse. My experience with that sort of thing is only with dogs – had to drive alone with three of them, 350 miles. They each got the individual dose the vet said to give; one was calm, one was comatose and the third acted as if I had given him a biscuit. I felt that it was just too chancy to use them on the return journey, and have viewed that sort of thing with suspicion ever since.

    It is never the horse's fault

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