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cantering issues. Help?

This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Equus101 Equus101 3 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • bri Original Poster bri
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 6

    I can never seem to get my horse danny boy to canter without going over a jump first. If I do get him into a canter it’s from a really fast trot and he just gallops right off. He goes so fast that every once in a while he is going to fast and can’t turn so I have to stop him immediately or I go flying into the fence. I want to start showing him soon because he is an amazing jumping I just can’t get him to canter first.

    equusparvus equusparvus
    Topics Started: 14Replies Posted: 12

    What are your cues for the canter? Make sure that you are asking for a different gait, not a faster one. Ask for the canter from a very slow trot. Try shortening your reins, sitting deep, and squeezing by the girth with your inside leg, while sliding your outside leg back a bit. If he starts to go faster, bring him back and correct him as quickly as possible and then ask again. If he starts to gallop off, do everything you can to bring him back to the trot. Also, have you considered that he might not be fully sound? He might actually be in pain when he canters, and that is why he chooses a different gait instead. I would definitely get him checked out by a vet as soon as possible.

    Equus101 Equus101
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Agree with Iola. Though it needs updating, there are a few things not on a standard vet check you might want to consider here:

    http://friendshiptraining.org/documents/SUDDENLY_TEMPERAMENTAL_OR_BUCKING_R.pdf

    We cannot solve the problems we have created, with the same thinking that created them. ~ Albert Einstein ~

    max max
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    sounds as if (in addition to getting a vet check) you may want to spend some time getting him “broke” before doing much jumping–it is important that the horse know how to collect and extend and have some modicum of self carriage and balance to safely and successfully jump. Getting him to understand how to canter involves learning to accept driving aids (legs), restraining aids (seat, bit) and sideways leg (to teach him to step under with the inside hind leg to strike off into the canter). A horse that is not balanced at the canter (and who canters too fast without steering) will flatten their arc over the jump, causing them to land and go faster with even less balance, which leads to knocking down jump rails and possibly causing him to feel insecure about jumping.

    Equus101 Equus101
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Aside from ‘getting him broke’ and using a bit, I agree max.

    We cannot solve the problems we have created, with the same thinking that created them. ~ Albert Einstein ~

    SAcres
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 21

    I think you need to take some lessons with a good trainer. Sounds like you don’t know how to properly cue your horse into the canter. Or your horse is green and hasn’t figured out the canter u/s yet. Either way, a trainer is your first step.

    Sundance Acres
    home to 6 overly spoiled, fat, shiny, adorable horses, and 4 cute barn kitties

    bri Original Poster bri
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 6

    Thanks so much:) He doesn’t know any canter cues. I just got him a couple months ago and before I got him he hadn’t been ridden in 2 years. :/ We have actually taken lots of lessons to. I was trained dressage before and my trainer is a level 3 dressage trainer. Danny boy loves jumping though so that’s what we do…

    bri Original Poster bri
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 6

    Thanks so much:) He doesn’t know any canter cues. I just got him a couple months ago and before I got him he hadn’t been ridden in 2 years. :/ We have actually taken lots of lessons to. I was trained dressage before and my trainer is a level 3 dressage trainer. Danny boy loves jumping though so that’s what we do… our canter cues though are what my instructor recommended to me and it has worked for all of the other horses I’ve worked with. Then again the other horses are usually dressage horses or show jumping horses.

    sally_l
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    I understand completely doing something you horse loves to do, but jumping is a serious ‘leap’ (please forgive the pun) in training if the canter is not under control. I would start by doing some ground work with him. Try lunging him at the trot and canter so he can learn what the three beat gait feels like. When lunging add a kiss or vocal signal to associate with the canter. Once he understands on the ground what the step is then bring it to the saddle and attach the vocal cue to the leg cue. He should be able to quickly connect what he was doing on the ground to what you are asking for in the saddle.

    When you work on the canter take the jumps out of the equation. You want him to feel comfortable in the gait before you add another element. If he bolts forward out of the trot into the gallop transition him back down to the trot and try again. Don’t stop him until you get at least four steps into the canter. Then stop, pat him(reward), and change directions. Let him figure out what he is supposed to be doing. If you have started on the ground first the learning curve should be fairly quick.

    sutclije
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 8

    When my horse was beginning his training, my trainer would lunge him and have him associate voice commands with the different gaits. She also worked on getting him to move off of pressure. When he began being ridden under saddle, he understood leg cues and also voice commands, so when she would apply the cue, she would also say the command, and he began to associate the gait with the leg cue. The first time he was cantered under saddle, it was done off of a small crossrail to get him to naturally pick up the canter rather than making it into a huge exciting event. For the next few canters under saddle, my trainer would apply the cues and say the word canter, and he picked it up. Now he is cantering perfectly under saddle. I would try going back to basics. I know you may want to show and jump, but sometimes we need to take a few steps back in order to get a better overall picture. You can’t rush good training!

    Equus101 Equus101
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    True forward impulsion comes from within, from the horse’s heart and spirit. Not from physical/external coercion. It results from a desire to ‘be with,’ to live, work, play, and share life together.

    If you have a positive relationship on the ground before you ever mount up, it is easy to transpose locomotive movement learned there to minute physical cues when riding.

    You only need three; forward, slow, stop.

    We cannot solve the problems we have created, with the same thinking that created them. ~ Albert Einstein ~

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