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constantly throwing shoes…

This topic contains 25 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  diandra_littledog 2 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
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  • jess_n_jazz Original Poster
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 15

    For the last few years, my horse has been throwing shoes more than often. The farrier comes about every 8 weeks, and its usually every other time he comes out to do shoes that my boy will end up throwing one of them. He only has front shoes and gets trimmed in the back. However, for the last couple of weeks it has been raining almost every day and the paddock he is turned out in is nothing but deep mud. He has thrown a shoe twice in the last 2 weeks, and I know its more than likely the mud that’s causing this, and I’ve asked that he not be turned out in that paddock. Our current farrier isnt wonderful either, and I will be moving my horse to a new barn next week so I already have a new farrier lined up to check his feet. He has never had any hoof health issues but they do crack around the edges of his shoes from time to time. I apply hoof conditioner as needed but wondering if thats enough…

    Anyone have any suggestions as to why this might be happening or what I could different to help avoid the throwing?

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Without pic or two of his feet and the work that your current farrier does, it is hard to evaluate the situation accurately. I would go so far as to say you might consider re-evaluating the horse’s diet, checking for sufficient biotin and selenium levels. Might also just be the farrier. Deep mud is a testament to any farrier really, and a genuine test of any shoe/hoof relationship : )

    Not unusual for hooves to crack and even chip at the nail line, ‘specially after having thrown or torn a shoe off. Might be because of poor farrier work, thin walls/soles, horse might be long in the hind toe or short in his front end stride that he steps on himself and catches a heel.. Could try a pair of bellboots for now… Might do better to see the farrier every 6 weeks instead of 8.. Sometimes, the farrier can be to blame, too, but where you are relocating, it is a moot point. Good luck with the move!!

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    What are your activities with him? Does he really need shoes at all, or could he go barefoot for awhile? It sounds to me that he is throwing shoes after a reset, rathen than when he gets new ones, so perhaps the old shoes are not being reset correctlY?

    It is never the horse's fault

    jess_n_jazz Original Poster
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 15

    pheets- thanks again for the awesome advice, I appreciate it! :) I was thinking of getting him some bell boots so ill probably order them sometime this week. Im also gonna have the new farrier take a look at his feet this weekend when I move him and see what he says. I have a feeling it is just my current farrier, I’ve never really been happy with his work from the beginning.

    joe-joe- I do primarily barrel racing with him. I ride almost every day during the spring and summer, and in the winter only on weekends since we don’t have an indoor and it gets dark early. We’ve tried him barefoot in the past and it didn’t work out so well, he was pretty sore. Like I said to pheets Im pretty sure it’s just my farrier, his prices are pretty cheap and he’s quick when he shoes so I don’t think he’s taking the proper time to evaluate his feet and set the shoes correctly. Also the wet weather lately hasn’t been helping either.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Hey, Jess, glad you find this helpful as that is my hope : ) Don’t get crazy on bellboots, buy the cheapy ones in bulk cos you will likely go thru them like water and get them in the brightest colour you can find as they run away in volume and are hard to find, ‘specially in mud and/or on a stepper (or in a busy barn, odd colours go farther to secure single ownership ; )

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    kindle kindle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    The mud will definitely suck shoes off. But have you tried having your farrier put clips on the shoes? Mine puts 2 clips on each shoe both front and back. Haven’t lost a shoe once since he started doing this. Clips prevent the shoe from shifting and takes a lot of strain off the nails.

    Viannah
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    Hello, interesting question as I had the same problem. I switched farriers, problem solved. My new great farrier recommended intervals of 6 weeks, 7 at the most. That is because in spring and summer hoofs just grow out faster and need trimming, in the fall winter however he recommended staying with the schedule because the mud etc. can really put the works on the shoes, as you have noticed. You don’t want to wait until the last minute to shone them, running the risk to break of half the hoof with it. Moreover, many farriers keep the nails more around the toe area, rather than spacing them out more. That was part of the problem with my old farrier. Since I switched all is good, horses are sound. Your new farrier should also be able to tell you if the horses diet needs any adjustments. I personally use only hay oats and barn bag and my guys have never looked better, top to bottom.

    Viannah
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    Hello, interesting question as I had the same problem. I switched farriers, problem solved. My new great farrier recommended intervals of 6 weeks, 7 at the most. That is because in spring and summer hoofs just grow out faster and need trimming, in the fall winter however he recommended staying with the schedule because the mud etc. can really put the works on the shoes, as you have noticed. You don’t want to wait until the last minute to shoe them, running the risk that if they throw the shoe they break of half the hoof with it. Moreover, many farriers keep the nails more around the toe area, rather than spacing them out more. That was part of the problem with my old farrier. Since I switched all is good, horses are sound. Your new farrier should also be able to tell you if the horses diet needs any adjustments. I personally use only hay oats and barn bag and my guys have never looked better, top to bottom.

    Buffalobabe
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Well, a good place to start is with SmartPaks! Nutrition is EVERYTHING! I was not paid for this statement. . .just a fact of life! Make sure your horse is absorbing the nutrition he is receiving with pre and probiotics! (This is good advice for human beings also!)

    One more thing! Question EVERYTHING! You will be surprised at how many people are finding alternatives to “the way it has always been done!” If you look for truth, you will find it!

    horsemagnet0112
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    You should try taking his shoes off and go barefoot for a while. It might help with this shoe problem.

    For the cracking however, Try and give him nmineral substances (like a smartpak or some other mineral) to help prevent cracking. Also , it might be the food your horse is on, he might need a better quality food for his bones to grown stronger and therefore cause them not to crack so easily.

    Nancy
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    MY Farrier came out this week and with all the rain told me he would not reset my horses shoes because of thrush under the shoe and in the nail holes. He said he could reshoe her but the next time the outter wall would not hold up. Fiz is used for barrel racing and trails. He suggested using apple cider vinigar or a bleach and watter mix for a week or an Iodine solution to kill the thrush as Thrush is a live organism. After he said brush the feet and go to every other day with a product that will kill the organism, I also use ISO ointment on the outter wall to help the hoove be plyable, Try some Iodine in the nail holes to help any thrush that maybe there and is weakening the wall. Fiz will be bare foot till her next Trim and doctored as the farrier said. I am using the apple cider viegar he said don’t use white it has no micro organisms in it that will kill the thrush. Just a suggestion as that maybe the cause of her throwing the shoes the wall is weakend. If that is the case and your farrier has not told u your horse has thrush when u claen the hooves look for a black line or spot then you will no the reason. Good Luck.

    karen_sykes
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Don’t be so quick to blame the blacksmith, if he was keeping shoes on before the wet and mud, blame Mother Nature. I live in FL the king of hoof challenges. Shoeing a week earlier can help, bell boots can help, Keratex, not the Gel the regular. It helps to understand how wet affects the hoof and mud acts like a suction cup. I am not a blacksmith nor involved with one. But I think they get too much blame for things we need to do to help prevent the problems.

    Cheval Noir Cheval Noir
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 10

    Over the years I tried everything. Everybody lives out, including the horses that show. What I came up with for all my horses that wear shoes is to do clips for the ones who lose shoes most often and put the most side pressure on the shoes. In hot weather when the flies are bad or wet weather when there’s lots of mud my farrier comes every 5 weeks for the bad ones, and every 6 weeks for the ones who hold shoes the best.

    I also feed all my horses Source for their feet, which is the thing that seems to help the most. It was recommended to me by a farrier 20 years ago. It’s cheap and provides lots of micro nutrients that are mostly unavailable anywhere else, except maybe other supplements I haven’t explored. Remember that if you begin using Source the results won’t show for at least 6 months when the new Source hoof grows out enough for the nails to penetrate the new hoof wall.

    Dano
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 21

    Lots of good info above and I agree. Closer intervals like sometimes every 5 weeks for a trim in spring/summer and farther out during colder months. It depends on horse, but 8 weeks is pushing it. I ask my farrier how long he thinks we can go each reset and trim. Grass or toe clips can help if there is a healthy hoof wall.

    The one thing I did not see mentioned, and you are changing shoers, but if the feet are not balanced properly, my farrier told me shoes come off more easily. They step on themselves or more stress on hoof. Excessive moisture/dry cycles can contribute to swelling of hoof wall then contracting. Hopefully the new place has better footing that dries out more quickly. Manure, urine, mud are not a good constant for feet.

    I think most horses benefit by a balanced diet and/or biotin supplement with methionine, zinc as well, to ensure hoof health. Our feeds and many pastures are deficient. Warning, I have tried Source and could not get my horses to eat the powdered form. Maybe pellets or granules, but the seaweed odor did not go over well and ours are not that picky! Good luck!

    Dano
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 21

    Sorry, I forgot to support the idea of trying a break without shoes if your horse has good enough feet. Again, a farrier recommendation, but this time of year the ground is so hard and often icy that he could get bruised. Most folks pull shoes for the winter in the late fall before the ground freezes…

    I have not been lucky enough to have horses that can go without front shoes even with mostly dry footing and daily biotin supplement. Some breeds, often TB types, have a genetically thinner hoof wall. I have an older QH with a very shallow sole and he HAS to have shoes on his front feet, but both of ours are fine barefoot behind. It saves on shoeing costs, lost shoe headaches and gives a little extra traction esp in winter with shoes on front. Our draftX needs to be shod in front to help his foot keep its shape. Some drafts’ feet can kind of “pancake”/spread outward and crack.

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