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Correcting Landing

This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 1 year, 11 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • JRmercede00 Original Poster JRmercede00
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 6

    I am an owner of a 15 year old mare who has been barefoot for approximately a year to two years. She’s been getting regular trimmings but I have noticed her back feet cross each other when she walks. She has now developed a small (not serious) quarter crack and her hooves slope. It would be great if you can answer me if there is any way we can correct her landing. P.S. She is a trail horse for now and we’re also thinking about shoeing her but not sure with the slope in her back hooves.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    This is something to discuss with your farrier. Does this crossing happen under saddle or when she is being led? Some horses (most notably mine) are rather sloppy when I am just leading them, but are fine when being ridden. The cracks could possibly be caused by stomping due to flies. Ours are the size of bombers (the flies, not cracks or chips in the hoof).

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Definitely worth a chat with your/a farrier. Also consider a chiropractic visit (for diagnostics now, and possibly future maintenance) as the mare is apparently moving differently than priour to this and it might be a misalignment within the spine causing her to pull her hind feet under her for support. The single-tracking or crossing over of her hind feet implies a hind end issue but not exclusively. The health and integrity (or lack of) of hocks, stifles and hips/pelvis can generate ways of going that can produce underrun heels in back..(because of her age, I might be inclined to rule out arthritis). Shoes MIGHT not be in her best interest AT THIS TIME as even a well placed shoe can change the horse’s WOG and force further compensation if there are any existing issues. Determine the cause first, then fix from the inside, out.

    Just out of curiosity, stand her square up. Look from directly behind her. Is she standing even and symmetrically developed on both sides? Hips/hocks level? Tailbone perpendicular to the ground? From the front, shoulders/elbows/knees even? Facial midline perpendicular to the ground? Ears level? Barrel even on both sides? Equal weight bearing on all four feet at the same time? Looking from BOTH sides, is she smooth along the top line? Does she fuss/shift (beyond balancing) at all about one foot or another when you pick hooves? Just the process of squaring her up might shed some light for you.

    Also and equally possible: she is favouring her front end for some reason (pulling her hind under to lighten the front), the reasons being similar to already mentioned. Something as simple a a slip in the mud, got up wrong from rolling or even just fell or maybe just torque’d herself in the paddock… any of these occurrences can create a wide variety of injuries from imperceptible to outright Home-worthy. One wrong step can set off a domino reaction faster than a set of… dominoes! Horses can hurt themselves so many different ways and to such a wide degree of offense! And some (too many) of these physical insults can be ohso subtle.

    I would venture to say that you might be seeing the result of some injurious (however minour at the time) action that had happened a while ago, the underrun heels in back being the result of compensatoury movement. Good luck with this situation, I do hope you find a cause and solution soon and can get back to a happy mare : )

    Horses. They are so fragile yet engage so completely in such freight train moments…
    Fingers crossed for both of you, JR!!

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Pheets – good reply! Finally found an equine massage therapist and the difference in Joe Joe (did not have Selena done) is nearly miraculous. She also showed us how to do it ourselves and left a wonderful diagram with notes about where each horse had some issues and how to work on them specifically. After checking with her farrier, perhaps this would be a good think for this mare as well. I hesitate to recommend non-traditional procedures until the vet/farrier has been consulted, in case they are more harmful than helpful.

    It is never the horse's fault

    JRmercede00 Original Poster JRmercede00
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 6

    Thank you everyone! I forgot to mention that she had a case of lameness a good while ago (years) and I believe she had to see a chiropractor too. I wish I knew more about her. I’ve only had her for two maybe three years and I’m still learning about her and horses too. She will cross and twist her hooves and legs + drag them when she walks! What a combo right?! She will walk a little slow but when she sees something oh man she can go. I know I should be doing this more often than once a month but with my dad’s schedule and working out in the oilfields it’s hard to excersice her. Her pen is a pretty good size. We usually take out to my uncles arena with soft sand so she can run. You should see her! With all her racing blood she sure can go!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Is there anyone around who is competent that you would trust to exercise her for you when you cannot? Once a month is fairly useless in terms of trying to keep her in condition.

    It is never the horse's fault

    JRmercede00 Original Poster JRmercede00
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 6

    No Joe-Joe it’s really hard. Only my dad knows about horses and my uncle+cousin. They are also at work. My uncle is the boss and his son works with him and my dad too😞 We try to take her out but we are in a crazy situation. It would be totally different if my Benny Girl lived with us but she’s at the work yard where my uncle keeps his horses too. It sounds bad but her pen is nice and big and my uncle takes care of his horses. I go to see my Benny Girl everyday and groom her once a week sometimes more. I have been putting Corona Hoof dressing on her too. It seems to be helping with her small cracks. I know it’s not very good to moisturize your horse’s hooves but with this you just put it on the coronet band and hoof bulb. When I see something wrong with her I make sure to tell my dad so he knows what’s going on. I’m kind if making it sound crazy with his work schedule but he gets off every weekend. I want to try my hardest to take her to the arena more often.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Hoof dressing is good for your horse, provided you use whichever is best for your situation and your horse.

    It is never the horse's fault

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 249

    Are you using a farrier who is proficient in bare foot trimming, or one who is used to trimming for shoes? Horses that go barefoot need to be trimmed differently than horses that have shoes on. If she is moving differently now than she did earlier, she could very well be out of alignment through her spine.

    slewelf
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Is this a new pattern or has she done this for a while? I kept my horses barefoot for several years and some of them would twist and cross over on landing with their back feet. I’ve since gone to shoes on all but my mustang and my two thoroughbreds are moving so much better and more evenly. Make sure her hooves are balanced and even on both hooves. It’s easy to have one side of the hoof higher than the other or one hoof a different length than the other hoof. Once you make sure she’s balanced, then you could try a chiropractor but it would be a waste of money of her hooves are still unbalanced. Good luck!

    Only perfect practice makes perfect.

    juni_greenough
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Hi the fact your horse is rarely ridden is likely a lot of the problem.
    I find even with my mare age 21 if she is under saddle less than 4 days a week she is less sound and comfortable and yes my horses are indeed barefoot.
    quarter cracks just plain happen esp if you are not trimming enough, we trim here every 5 to max 6 weeks to keep they under control.you need a bare foot horse trimmer not just a farrier too.
    so ride the horse at least every othr day or find her a home or part lease rider who is kind that will do that, its frankly not in your horses best interest to be ridden once a week much less once a month…sorry

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    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    If you see her every day, why do you not groom and ride every day (weather permitting)? Horses need the care, exercise and the bonding.

    It is never the horse's fault

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