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Cracks

This topic contains 15 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  dannyboy 3 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • StardustLover12 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 5

    My horses have always been barefoot with strong hooves, but since we have moved they’ve begun to have large cracks and splits that are concerning. I put them on SmartHoof Ultra about 3 months ago, and I know it takes awhile for the new hoof to grow out, but I was wondering if there was anything else I could do in the meantime. They’re on 24 hour turnout so it’s difficult to keep hoof dressings or sealants on their hooves. They get their feet done every six weeks now, which is more than they’re used to, and they only stay nice for a few days after they are done. It is very frusterating to watch such great hooves break apart. If anyone has any advice, I’d greatly appreciate hearing from you. Thank you all for your time.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 474

    Where you say this is since you’ve moved, perhaps it is a dietary lack (different hay? Grain? Graze? Terrain?). If hooves are shelly/flakey/chippy, my first thought would be hydration and/or lack of copper/iodine/selenium/biotin, any or all of the above, tho these are certainly not the only causes or possibilities. Maybe have your hay analyzed, if possible.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Dragon Tea Dragon Tea
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 18

    How bad of cracks are you talking about?

    When I moved down South my horse could no longer go barefoot, he needed shoes due to the sand and harder ground down here cracking his feet and wearing them away quickly. My horse gets his feet done every 5 weeks because his hoof supplement makes the hooves really grow quickly.

    I recommend Keratex Hoof Hardener for every other day application on the hoof and speaking with your farrier or getting a farrier to help you with this issue. It’s expensive and worth it.

    I keep Whtie Lightning, Thrush Buster, and Keratex Hoof Hardener in my trunk always just in case.

    kats_underthestars
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Have you been getting a lot of rain? I know I have. I have never had an issue with either of my horses hooves, but this year I have had 2 abscesses and a huge split has now formed on the front hoof of one of my horses. The farrier said that the split was due to moisture being trapped in the hoof and it breaks down the fibers in the hoof wall…i highly recommend Kopertox and turpentine. Both stay on fairly well in the pasture too. Just apply daily.

    Leslie Leslie
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 44

    I second Ketatex Hoof Hardener. It won’t rub off, it soaks in, so it will be fine in your situation.

    Have you talked to your farrier about your concerns? He should be able to fix it if he kmows what he is doing.

    On the other hand… could be the farrier’s fault too. Though I wouldn’t want to automatically jump to this conclusion. Are you in a boarding situation? If so how are the other horses’ feet?

    www.createdbyleslie.com - handmade custom wood-burned brushes, stall signs, & portraits, etched glasses, and custom stuffed ponies

    Leslie Leslie
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 44

    Also, are they in work? If the terrain is harder than they’re used to you might want to consider getting a pair of hoof boots to ride in.

    www.createdbyleslie.com - handmade custom wood-burned brushes, stall signs, & portraits, etched glasses, and custom stuffed ponies

    StardustLover12 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 5

    Thank you all for your input. Their feed and hay have stayed the same, so I don’t think it is dietary. Our farrier does a great job making their feet look nice, it’s just that they crack and split again in about a week. We have been getting a lot of rain lately. We have five horses here, and all of them are getting a little worn, but two of them in particular are the worst. I’ll look into the Hoof Hardener, where is it usually sold? Tractor Supply or most tack shops?

    Leslie Leslie
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 44

    I’ve always just bought it online, SmartPak has it – I haven’t been able to find any locally at least where I live, Tractor Supply doesn’t carry it.

    You put it on 7 days in a row and then after that just 2x a week. Make sure to pour some in the cap and use it from there or the entire bottle turns brown after first use from dipping the brush back in.

    www.createdbyleslie.com - handmade custom wood-burned brushes, stall signs, & portraits, etched glasses, and custom stuffed ponies

    StardustLover12 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 5

    Okay, thanks!

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    Some horses are fine getting a trim every 6 weeks, but often they end up needing a trim every 4 weeks. This may be a consideration for you. My horses have been barefoot their whole lives and I do have to trim every 4 weeks. This might help their hooves stay in better condition. Also, it might help if you did a touch up trim in between their regular trims.
    Hope their hooves get better!

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    I forgot to mention a very important part of preventing cracks is a really good roll on the hoof wall after each trim.

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    I meant to say “a good roll on the bottom of each wall”.

    rachael_lara
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 7

    I agree with naturalpasture on the four week schedule. Also make sure your farrier knows how to do a barefoot trim since it is a lot different then trimming up for a shoe. I do all my own farrier work and have no issues with cracking. If I procrastinate to long my appy will chip off on the sides but never crack. As for my mustang, her hooves are living rock, so cracking and breaking are unheard of no matter how long.

    A barefoot trim leaves less wall on the outside so their sole helps with support. First timers tend to lame up a bit because they are like humans, we need to get used to going barefoot, some horses are tender footed and need shoes or boots for rocky terrain so keep that in mind.

    The hoof should have a nice concave bottom, but the walls should not protrude down and be the only weight carrier, that would cause cracking. The heal is cut down level with the frog and the front portion of the hoof is rolled up. If you ever do have a dry spell pine tar and vegetable oil in equal portions stays on very well in the pasture and moisturizes the hoof, as well as being much more affordable than other methods(your farrier will thank you for not having to trim rocks).

    I recommend getting a hoof rasp and having your farrier show you how to use it. If you touch up the round edges and clean up the hoof a little between trims that can also help. Make sure its sharp. Its all about the pressure you apply. Apply to much pressure and you can’t move the rasp, to little and nothing is shaved off.

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    I totally agree with rachael_lara. Good points! A barefoot trim is very different from a typical trim!!! Also, if the hoof is cracking there is too much pressure on the hoof wall. That pressure needs to be spread out over the entire bottom of the hoof.

    StardustLover12 – do you have a picture of a couple hooves? Bottom and side views? The cleaner the hoof the better. :)

    brian_slattery
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I have been using a cheap brand of olive oil to lubricate the hoofs of my horses . Clean around the frog a under hoof area & apply oil to the underside of the hoof as well as the outer hoof area
    For brittle hoofs apply every 2 weeks
    healthy hoofs apply once a month
    The oil is not dangerous & keeps the hoof supple & strong

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