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Cribbing

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Shadow1991 Shadow1991 3 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • Shadow1991 Original Poster Shadow1991
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 19

    I got a mare from my friend that cribs. She got this habit while at a trainers place where she was stalled while not being trained. She is 4 y.o. now and was at the trainers as a 3 yr. old. My friend said she will crib off and on. She was not stalled on a regular basis at my friends and she will never be stalled at my place. I have a barn for them to get out of the weather but I don’t lock them in. I got her 5 days ago and I have caught her cribbing on the wood in our front lot, the pasture has no wood for her to crib on. I don’t notice her doing it a lot, just will do it a couple times and walk off. She never lost weight while at my friends from doing this and she would occationally put a cribbing collar on her but not all the time. I have never had a horse that cribs so not that knowledgable about it. I hate to have to put the collar on her since she isn’t doing it a lot but should I put one on her anyways? Any advice I’d really appreciate. Also an aquaintance of my friend used this mare along with two of her other horses from July until this past weekend. She told my friend she didn’t crib while at her place. When the horses left in July they were all healthy and probably a tad overweight. This mare and the gelding that came back were in bad shape, thin and no muscle. The other mare that was overweight when she left and is also boss mare looked fine. She was working these horse on roping and apparently not giving them the feed to make up for all the calories they were burning. The mare I am getting back into shape isn’t as bad as the gelding but I do see her ribs and she is sucken in her weithers and flank area. I also noticed on all three that came back on their backs where the back of the saddle would end they all have a lump right where their spine is, guessing the pad wasn’t big enough for the saddle and it kept jamming into their backs?

    LibbyLou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    ugh. wow so sorry you’re horses were so mistreated at that “trainers” house!
    first, good for you for not locking them in a stall! If it were me, Make sure they have 24/7 hay available and wait it out. I would not do the collar thing. (UGH) to slow the horses down while eating use slow feed hay nets. Smartpak has some, and you can get other ones that fit round bales and small squares. they are a LIFESAVER for me! I would not be without them.
    Good luck!!

    marian_zeitlin
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Our TB gelding is a cribber. We had to keep a collar on him when we boarded, but now we keep him at home and do not use a collar. His cribbing occurs mostly around feeding time so we just reinforced the fence planks in the area where he most indulged. We’ve been through several feed tubs in his stall too. He’s a healthy horse who is turned out more than he is in his stall. I feel it’s a condition that can’t be cured, so we just manage the surfaces he cribs on and let him be.

    Shadow1991 Original Poster Shadow1991
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 19

    I do have a large bale of hay they have access to 24/7 and then I feed them the small bales before and after I get off work. The big bale is grass hay, the small have alfalfa mix and then I grain them at night too. I’m hoping with her being turned out 24/7 she will not crib quite so much as she would if she were to be stalled. Come summer I have different pastures I can rotate them on where they will have all the grass they can eat. I’ll have to look into the slow feeding bags, it would be good for all my horses. Two of my others are super easy keepers and are a little on the tubby side :)

    Thanks for the suggestions, I appreciate your comments and advice.

    Amy

    horsejd9 horsejd9
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Our horses that live inside get bored a lot and sometimes crib, so normally as long as they are entertained and have a good amount of hay in their stall they wont crib. We only have one horse known to crib often, I just keep the collar on him when he’s in his stall (when he gets his grain and main portion of hay I take it off) and he never cribs with it on. You can also get pads and bumpers to make the collar more comfortable to leave on all the time.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Cribbing can be attributed to so many causes, stress/boredom being one of the most common. Pain frequently connected to ulcers is also sadly common. I have a mare that used to crib but I found, by accident, that she stopped cribbing when I started adding a LOT of water to her meals. I suspect her cribbing was ulcer or gut related and extra water seems to be a positive thing for her. She, too, would only crib right after meals, and was easily redirected. My gelding would crib if he knew how…. he resorts to licking the walls during meals but again, plenty of water (initially for a dental issue) in his grain and now he only ‘tastes” the walls where he drools his gruel. I can’t swear by it but two for two presents a possible pattern here : )

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    I would also like to add that cribbing straps, regardless of type, can often stop the effect but not always the attempt. Fine line between trying and succeeding when it comes to cribbing.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Shadow1991 Original Poster Shadow1991
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 19

    My friend I got her from sent two different cribbing collars to use if I needed them. Just hate to have to resort to it since she is out to pasture 24/7 and doesn’t do it non stop. I put some stuff on the fencing where I’ve noticed her doing it hoping the taste will deflect her from doing it. I just got her last Sunday so I’m going to try and just keep an eye on her and go from there.

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