Daily Dewormer

This topic contains 15 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  HorseGirl 2 years, 4 months ago.

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  • horsewsm Original Poster horsewsm
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 0

    What are y’all’s experiences with daily dewormer’s? I am going to discuss my worming protocol with my new vet (moved states) but my previous vet recommended a daily dewormer (strongid c2x) and then worming twice a year with ivermectin. Is the daily dewormer really necessary? By using it am i just contributing to resistance? My two horses are never out on grass where there have been other horses and I do my best to keep their pasture’s immaculate.
    Like I said, I will discuss with my vet but I just wanted to know y’all’s thoughts.

    "In wilderness is the preservation of the world."- Thoreau

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    I am not a fan of daily dosing with such necessary chemicals when a fecal test can be done so inexpensively (there is enough…stuff…. in their grain products and/or supplements these days). With fecals, one is able to determine the actual parasite in question and subsequently allows for specific treatment of THAT “worm” instead of infusing the horse’s system with a load of broad spectrum chemicals and the hope that it works without building resistance.

    Where your horse is not exactly in a transient situation or consistent graze, be sure to ask your vet about fecal testing. Where you keep your yard very clean (and your horse is alone? with regular company?), to me, a daily feed-thru is too close to overkill. Just way more than you need.

    This is merely an opinion and mine only. No intention whatsoever in defying your vet’s opinion or suggestion. Do right by your horse : )

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    mary_kahn
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    One word – Fecals. Like the previous poster…I don’t like daily dosing with a chemical just to prevent the POSSIBILITY of a worm infestation. Additionally, I believe daily dosing increases drug resistance which is becoming a problem in some areas.

    Fecals allow you to specifically attack whatever type of worm your horse has…or, even better, there have been times I didn’t have to treat my horses because their fecals were clean. I do fecals every 8 weeks just like I would do arbitruary dewormings.

    JMHO and I have a saying…your horses/your way, my horses/my way. 🙂

    nelsonrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    You should be feeding daily dewormer in the spring as the grass is coming up and your horse is eating close to the ground and have a higher exposure to the eggs in the soil. These eggs can stay in the soil for years. Daily dewormer kills the larvae as they hatch out before they start their migration through the gut. strongid c is a safe product and even with years of use we are not seeing resistance at this time. Resistance is best fought with rotation of dewormer groups. Fecals should be preformed annually as well as a review with your veterinarian to their meaning and if there should be changes to the deworming routine. I actually do one in May and another in September after the spring graze and the summer graze.

    Silverchex Silverchex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    I personally would not want to have all those chemicals given to my horse everyday. I feed Animal Element’s Equine Detox daily which has DE in it as well as other human grade herbs to keep worm infestation to a minimum. Then you can do a fecal and find out exactly what you’re dealing with. The AE works as my horses have minimum to no worms. Then I can worm accordingly. The AE also contains Diatomaceous Earth, Organic Kelp, MSM, Red Raspberry Leaf, Hawthorn, Turmeric, Spirulina, Fenugreek and Hyaluronic Acid. You can read more about it here:
    http://www.animalelement.com/equine/equine-detox-9-lb.html

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Silverchex Silverchex.
    paula_lambievanbemmelen
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    YES it builds up resistance, so definitely no every month worming is the new advise of many vets. Just spring and fall with a stronger dewormer and fecals in between to act if needed.
    I give Diatomaceous Earth in between (every other month) just to make sure they stay healthy and without worms.
    We have a 10 stall horse barn with pastures and paddocks (that we keep clean every day), but have hardly any worms.
    Works for us.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I don’t worm unless my horses actually have worms, and one has not had any in at least the two years he has been mine. Only got the other at the end of January, at which time she was free of worms, and just had a fecal taken (did not get the results yet). I don’t medicate for things we none of us have (me, horses, dogs and cats). What would be the point?

    It is never the horse's fault

    janakay
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    This topic is of interest to me. I have been feeding a daily dewormer to one of my horses since last October on the advice of my vet. The horse has a severe allergy to neck threadworms which makes him itch violently and rub off his hide. Regular worming rotation, even combined with steroids, was not enough. The season for threadworms is May and June, so we are about to see if the daily dewormer is helping.

    pflady
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    I have annual fecals done on my horses. They always turn up negative. My vets tell me to worm with moxidectin in the fall and ivermectin in the spring (to catch encysted worms, etc). So far so good. Seems like daily dewormer would lead to resistance as well as being a waste of money.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Hi, Janakay : )

    There are times when a daily feed-thru IS appropriate such as in your case. When there is an exception to the “rule”, accommodations must be made for the benefit of the horse. Where your boy has issues beyond general annoyance, you must take the next step in promoting the best health possible. The possible resistance is outweighed by the ensuing self-destruction. Pick your battles, I hope this season is a mild one for you and your boy!

    I am far from a fan of feed-thru chemicals but if I were in your shoes, and my horse had the same issue, I would do whatever to ensure better health and use a daily dewormer if that’s what it takes (as long as it works). The health and welfare of my horses trumps any opinion I might have.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    lea_rogers
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Your vet needs to update their information on dewormers and resistance. There are plenty of studies available that provide newer information and indicating that excessive deworming is not a good choice any more. I believe you will find studies and presentation by University of Florids vet school on the internet that will support this.
    Also, I personally believe that poisoning your horse is not a good thing. Deworming is necessary for health of the animal, and to date there is no other good way, but remember their stomach, liver and kidney still have to process this toxin …..and it does affect the immune system overall, combined with our injections, pesticides and environmental exposures.

    janakay
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Pheets is correct. My vet is an equine specialist, and people come to see them from all over the state, so I trust him completely. Here is my current situation: as someone who suffers from chronic illness myself, I know very well that sometimes you have to pick your battles. Would you tell a cancer patient not to have chemo because it’s not good to put poison in your body? What does tomorrow matter if you can’t survive today. My horse has nearly killed himself and others at least once due to this condition. I HAVE to find some way to help him.

    Silverchex Silverchex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    Why not feed an equine detox with Diatomaceous Earth like I stated above along with your feed through wormer? The herbs have to build up in the system before they become effective. This will help detox the body then gradually reduce the feed through wormer and keep testing the fecal for worms. Many vets don’t believe in functional/alternative medicine just like doctors dont. I’ve been thru surgery before where I almost passed and the chemically created meds were necessary but I had so many problems after the fact. I’ve learned to integrate the alternative with the conventional if that makes sense. I would be looking for a way to reduce the chemical feed through wormer. I’ve done that with Animal Element’s Equine Detox. Wishing your horse the best…

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    My own opinion, of course, but I think bothLea and Silverchex have valid points and have offered useful information (thank you, both, much appreciated for my own horses’ benefit ). Worth consideration tho to go with what is necessary yet in the most supportive and chemically benign (if THAT makes any sense) way is best but not always possible. We all know that what works one way for one might not work in the same way or at all for another. There is also the timing of deworming and the regular/predictable infestation seasons to consider.. Trial and errour is still a common practice, unfortunately, but we learn, day to day. Deworming methods and knowledge are definitely improving along with the products we use. I, for one, am most grateful for a broader range of options.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Just got the fecal results for my two horses (who only get wormed if they need it) – Joe Joe had a count of 6 and Selena had a count of 12 (these are egg counts ). My vet says anything under 150 is considered good control. They will not be getting wormed this spring. I do have fecal counts done every 2 to 3 months, to be on the safe side.

    It is never the horse's fault

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