Disrespectfull on the Ground

This topic contains 14 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by riding for Christ riding for Christ 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • Summer Original Poster
    Topics Started: 9Replies Posted: 19

    I have a 12 year old gelding who will NOT let us catch him. He will pin his ears back, turn his butt towards you, run around the pasture. He’s a good horse, he just can be very stubborn sometimes, and i have joined up with him like 20 times and he still does it, help?!

    adrahmsn
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 4

    my horse did this alot. I put him with a buddy so when i cannot catch him i catch his friend and he usally follows. Then i walk his friend out and he follows and someone else uses grain to lure him in.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Since I am old and lazy, I taught mine to come to the gate when I want them, by using peppermint horse treats. They have a positive view of me as a walking grocery store or something, and if they aren’t already at the gate when I get there, they come when called. I cannot be limping around a field trying to catch a horse.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Summer Original Poster
    Topics Started: 9Replies Posted: 19

    I’ve tried that, i fear it’s way to far past that

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Okay – this will sound really odd, and probably best to do in warm weather. Bring out a chair of some sort and a book. Sit out there, read and ignore him. Horses mostly do not want to be ignored. If he comes to you, say hi, but do nothing else. Eventually, one hopes, he will eventually give up the other game in favor of getting you to play with him. Then, take him out of the field to hand graze that great stuff on the other side of the fence for awhile and put him back in his field. He will stop associating leaving the field with work or vets, etc., and should be more reasonable about being caught. Of course, you would have to vary your activities with him, so he doesn’t know what’s in store when you do get him. Another thing would be to go out, call him to you (obviously after he does come when you call), give him some treat or other, pet him and leave. It will likely take a longish period of time, during which perhaps when you do want him, try to have someone get him for you, so as not to interrupt the rehab.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    I’ve had that problem but not to that degree – here’s what works for me. (I also use the treat method as my real carrot in the carrot/stick method)

    If my horse runs, he is not allowed to stop running until I say he can. IOW I bring out my lunge whip (only works if you’ve never hit them with it – or if they have no phobia of it) and drive the rebellious horse around the pasture for several minutes. I don’t let him quit moving until I SAY he can stop. I want him prepared to listen, so this takes persistence and not just stopping at the first sign he’s tired. He has to turn and lick/chew with his head down, and when I stop and put the end of the lunge whip on the ground, he must come to me looking me squarely in the eye. If not he gets to run some more. This is not joining up, this lesson is: work is over there, and rest is over here next to me. You go over there and I’ll make you work your butt off.

    The first few days he does this will take time and determination as he has learned that he can stall you by getting away. He will test your resolve. He needs to learn that the new rules apply !!!every time!!! he wants to play dodge ball, you play tag, and work him. Pretty soon he’ll figure there is far less effort to just come to you. (Hence the carrot).

    Every so often, when the vet comes for example, my horses think maybe they’ll hang out at the end of the pasture (how do they know?!) instead of coming, but I haul out the bright blue lunge whip and they’ll come straight away, not wanting to spend the next twenty minutes at a trot/canter/run.

    Be sure to desensitize with the whip on the ground as part of your ground work by using it to rub the back, withers and neck with praise. The object is not to make them fear the whip, but to decide that the choice is between running and coming, so there is less work in just coming to you. I use the same brightly colored whip because it becomes the symbol that they can see from across the pasture. (Horse thinks: Uh-oh, if I don’t get over there, I’m going to have to run for the next half hour.) I have never hit a horse with a whip in my life. I would guess that once a person has done that – this exercise is over – who is going to come to get hit with a whip? Not me. I’ll run til I drop, so remember the whip is a symbol and a tool to make them move, not a weapon for your frustration. And be consistent by keeping it still and placing the tip end on the ground when you are inviting them over.

    Hope this works as well for you as it does for me. Be persistent and consistent, and gentle. Do not ever let them see frustration because that’s a negative emotion, and it is the same as saying to the horse “you win”.

    And one last thing, never be in a hurry to get your horse. When they see “hurry” they think uh-oh, not good. Even if you have only ten minutes you walk over as if you’ve got all day.

    As I trail ride, and sometimes with novices, I’ve had a spooked loose horse a few times over the years, and when I am in the back of beyond in bear country, that horse better come when I call, even when I’m riding another horse. This training works great for that. My horses come to a whistle, even when they are loose and know it.

    I also agree with Joe-Joe about pulling him out of his pasture just for pleasure – if it’s always work the above training method will have headwinds. It will eventually work, but it will take longer. Try Joe-Joe’s “let’s go for a fun grazing walk where I give you treats and groom you and pet you and put you back” in conjunction with the ‘if you run you will have to run until I say stop’ method, and you should see a change. Good luck.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Summer Original Poster
    Topics Started: 9Replies Posted: 19

    Thanks

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Summer – let us know how it goes! There is nothing more irritating than a horse who stays one step ahead of you all the time.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Shadowfax Shadowfax
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    These are all good ideas and I practice them with my own horses, except the treat part. I give treats as a surprise maybe twice a week after end of any training session. Another thing you can try is just turning your horse out in the round pen, let him run around by himself without any direction from you, then get him to face you and catch him weather he walks to the center or not. Halter him, rub his neck a few times, then take it off and walk away leaving him to do what he pleases. If he follows you, definitely acknowledge by rubbing then playfully chase him off to go run. Do this a couple more times then put him away. He’ll soon come to realize that you catching him may mean nothing but a loving reward. I’ve done this many times with my four horses and three will run to meet me while the other makes me come to him but waits nonetheless. It’s def worth a try. If I made you go to the store every time I asked you get dressed, you wouldn’t want to get dressed anymore. I do the same with saddling. We may ride, and we may not. This way nothing is predictable and it keeps up the curiosity. Good luck! I understand the frustration. I volunteered for a therapeutic riding center where this one horse had me chase him all over the pasture. When he was done having his fun and had me halfway out in the field, he would happily trot up to the gate and wait for me there. Oh that horse!

    "A horse is the mirror to your soul...and sometimes, you may not like what you see in the mirror"-Buck Brannaman

    CHERYL H.
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Hi, I had this problem for a year. My “trainer” would enter her paddock with a treat and catch her. I DO NOT recommend this. She sometimes would take the treat and then run away, teaching her nothing.
    Here’s a sure fire way to fix this bad habit.
    Always enter your horse’s area with a lunge whip while you are changing this behavior. The moment he starts to move away from you and/or turn his butt to you chase him away. Then verbally tell him to come to you and turn his face to you. If he doesn’t then chase him away again. If he threatens to kick, smack him hard on the butt. It takes approx. a month to change a habit. Always be ready with your whip during this reprogramming time period. Soon he will find it enjoyable to come to you and be haltered. THEN you can give him a treat. But only after he allows you to halter him. Also a really great reward is your voice telling him what a good boy he is and a scratch on the neck or withers. Horses are very in tune to the tone of your voice. Good luck with him! Cheryl

    denise_gaskinsblount
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I had a horse that did this many years ago. One of my teachers (a very awesome man, Johnnie Wetherington) told me to go out into the pasture and not to even look at her, just keep walking around, slowly, like I was looking for a quarter in the grass. He said she’d get curious and would want to see what I was looking at and sure enough, she did. When she got right next to me, looking to see what I was looking at, I would slip a lead line around her neck. Worked like a charm. 🙂

    ncrodeoqueen ncrodeoqueen
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 2

    Any horse will be stubborn. My question ( I have only read yours) is do you have a relationship with this horse. Are you only getting him out to ride and do hard work? If so he’s turning away from that. I would try leaving the lead line away, take a can of feed, a brush in your back pocket and try and get him to come up to you. If he tries to kick you or act like it, he’s twice your size and won’t feel it. Kick him back, belly if you can reach it, he’s kicked there all the time. Go out there, even if he doesn’t come up to you and wander around. Let him come up to you. Brush him. He may just be tired of a repetition. Work in his home, don’t take him out to always work at your home. I hope this helps some!!

    "Riding Gone Wild"

    ncrodeoqueen ncrodeoqueen
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 2

    I have a 12 year old gelding who will NOT let us catch him. He will pin his ears back, turn his butt towards you, run around the pasture. He’s a good horse, he just can be very stubborn sometimes, and i have joined up with him like 20 times and he still does it, help?!

    run around the pasture. He might just also want attention.

    "Riding Gone Wild"

    Summer Original Poster
    Topics Started: 9Replies Posted: 19

    Thanks ncrodeoqueen. I think i have a relationship with him. Some days i just groom him and play around with him. Some days it’s a fun hack or gallop in the field. and about once a week it’s hard core training. And i don’t think i would ever kick my horse.

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    I agree with Shadowfax. This method works really well with horses that don’t want to be caught.

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