Dragging back hooves

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  G & S 1 year, 6 months ago.

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  • Dillon&Jake Original Poster
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 9

    I own a 11 year old Quarterhorse. He’s slightly overweight and lazy. Ever since I’ve had him he’s dragged his back toes when he walks/trots/canters. My farrier noticed it because he has worn down the front of his hooves so much it could become painful. He drags his feet at all times even without a rider. He can pick his back hooves up fine. He goes over cavaletti and jumps. Could this be because he is lazy, or could it be medical?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Sounds more like a physical issue to me.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Dillon&Jake Original Poster
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 9

    Ok. Thanks for your reply. Do you know what I could do to help him?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    First, you would need to determine the cause-I would ask my vet, farrier, trainer, etc. In order to help, you have to know where he needs something. Sadly, the possibilities are nearly endless.

    It is never the horse's fault

    dmaequestrian dmaequestrian
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 10

    If he is not having trouble with jumping, this could just be a laziness issue. How long do you work him? He could just be getting tired. Also, his hind muscles or stomach muscles might not be strong enough. Try lots of transitions and endurance work to help him become more fluid and learn to collect. The more you do this, the more it will force him to carry himself correctly.

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    You might want to have the horse checked out by an equine chiropractor. He could be out of alignment somewhere that makes it uncomfortable to move normally. A few vets have also had training as equine chiropractors, but most have not, and the concept of horses having a misalignment has only become known in the last 20 years, so many people do not realize that horses can & do sometimes need to have their alignment checked and corrected. If you have ever had an un-diagnosed misalignment, you would probably be aware of how painful a misalignment can be. But since this is, within the horse world, still a fairly new concept, mis-alignments are often missed.

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