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Feeding for moderate work

This topic contains 14 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by Silverchex Silverchex 11 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • Kaifyre Original Poster Kaifyre
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Hello all, new to this forum but not to horse keeping. I worked as a colt starter for two trainers in Nevada and have owned several older horses but recently I purchased my first “personal use” colt, a 2-year-old untouched Appaloosa. That was back in August and since then he’s come a long way. Dreams is on a deworming schedule, SandClear the first week of every month, and over the winter was on a mix of Omolene 200 and Amplify to beef him up a bit (we have very cold winters here in Montana). He’s fed free choice grass/Timothy hay mix. He filled out great and was at a perfect weight until about a week ago.
    Since Omolene is more of a sweet feed and it’s getting warmer now I’ve been dialing that back and about a week ago I stopped feeding it altogether. Apparently Dreams is picky since he won’t eat the Amplify unless it’s mixed with something. So once I pulled the Omolene he wouldn’t eat any of it and subsequently his weight dropped, not significantly but I’d like to keep him where he was, especially since I’ll be breaking him soon so his workload will increase a bit. I’ve always fed straight oats to my horses but they were all older (7 years +) so I was just wondering what you all feed to your young ‘uns during light to moderate work? Or would straight oats be fine? I’m pretty sure there’s no significant nutritional requirement for young horses except for the very young ones like weanlings, but this is my first horse in 4 or 5 years so maybe something’s changed? : )
    Thanks for all of your input. I look forward to exchanging knowledge with this community.

    All the best,

    –Kai

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by Kaifyre Kaifyre.

    I call you Far Rider, not for your races and your fine pony, but because you are one who rides far from himself, and wishes not to look home.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Straight oats should be okay, so long as you are careful to make sure he gets all the minerals and other nutritional needs that are not be found in plain oats. another option might be to buy dry molasses (which you can wet if you wish) to make whatever you are giving him more palatable. There is no real reason of which I am aware to take him off the sweet feed just because it is spring.

    Why do you have him on a deworming schedule? Is he wormy? My preference is to have a fecal count done, and only worm when necessary. So far, my horses have not needed to be wormed but once in the last three and a half years.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Kaifyre Original Poster Kaifyre
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Yes, Dreams was an untouched colt left in a pasture his whole life until I bought him and he was so full of worms I’m surprised he didn’t get sick. He was also thin, with a patchy coat and had no energy. I had a fecal count done once he was halter broke and handleable. He had 3 different infestations. In the beginning it wasn’t at all uncommon to see live worms crawling around in his feces. : /
    And now that I’ve moved to Montana it may be different (I honestly hadn’t thought of that until now lol) but in southern Nevada it was so hot in the summer (frequently over 120 degrees) that sweet feed made a lot of folks’ horses colic. 2 of mine did before we switched to straight oats and never had a problem after that. Although here in the eastern part of Montana it’s about -30 every winter and 100 every summer so we can get pretty hot too. I’ll look into the dry molasses, hadn’t thought of that. Though perhaps a broad spectrum supplement to take care of the nutrients he needs? : )

    –Kai

    I call you Far Rider, not for your races and your fine pony, but because you are one who rides far from himself, and wishes not to look home.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I am not sure if there is a broad spectrum supplement, but mine get the following: flax seed, garlic (for ticks), probios and MSM. Joe Joe and Rowan also get Smartpak Muscle Mass, Selena gets Smartpak Calm, and Rowan and Selena get Mare Magic (obviously unnecessary for a colt). In winter I do add the dry molasses, mostly because the liquid is so messy and difficult to measure. Their grain is Triple Crown Senior (they range in age from 12 to 23), which you might not need. All this is mixed with timothy hay cubes into a kind of soup, which they love. I spend more time and effort on their food than I do my own, but they are all at a good weight, even coming out of winter (Selena is actually a bit fatter than she needs to be), and healthy. Joe Joe and Selena are Arabians, and Rowan came from a kill pen in December (even the kill buyers did not want her, because she only weighed 712 lbs, which is why I bought her – she needed a safe place to live with food on a regular basis). She has now gained about 150-200 lbs., and is horse shaped.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Kaifyre Original Poster Kaifyre
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Your horses are all gorgeous! : )
    Thanks for your help, I’ve had several people tell me flax is amazing so I might try that out. I’ll have to mix up a cocktail for Dreams, heh!

    –Kai

    I call you Far Rider, not for your races and your fine pony, but because you are one who rides far from himself, and wishes not to look home.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    If you have the time to do it, I feel that mixing is the best way to go, as you have more certainty as to how much of what they are getting.

    Thank you for the compliment! Attaching Selena’s picture, as it seems I left her out.

    It is never the horse's fault

    flying turtle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    I usually find if my horses do not like something to trust them. There is most likely something in it that they do not need…..If you have to mask it w/something sweet – not good. That in mind sweet feed is not a good feed. I would try a good quality enzyme (ABC or ?) to ensure he is receiving all the nutrients from the food that he is eating. This is a good starting point for just about anything (sometimes ProBiotics are needed also), and many times is all that is needed for supplementation to a good diet (low to no grain, hay, pasture, vit/min supplement). My old gelding (31 yrs) was thin and very lame. I tried many “supplements”. The last year he improved tremendously after I put him on ABC Fortified, ABC Enzymes, Timothy pellets (Semican), and Tim/Alfalfa minis (Semican). NO GMO’s. This improvement came even though he LOST HIS GRIND TOO!

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    Sweet feed and whole grains are harder for a horse to digest and they don’t really get all the nutritional values out of it because it just goes through them. You can tell that the feed isn’t broke down from looking at their poop. A pelleted feed that has a higher fat content and other values can be broke down easily with you fingers and your horse gets what he needs because of that, so, the whole grains is a lot harder break down.
    I feed my horses Total Equine, it is like a pelleted feed. Horses love Total Equine because it tastes good and it has all really good nutritional values. I haven’t fed my horses Total Equine in a while and they were shedding more better after I started giving it to them again. Here is the website if you would like to read about it. Also Total feeds has many different kinds of feeds.
    http://www.totalfeeds.com

    Viannah
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    I completely took all of my horses off sweet feed. They get pasture and free choice hay, and at night I soak Timothy pellets and add triple crown racing oats to their feed, depending on each horses needs, but no more than one lb for my hard keeper. However, the main part of their diet is Barn Bag. It’s a ration balancer that has everything that horses on a natural grass diet need. The oats are just for extra calories should they need it. In the spring and summer oats are hardly needed. I also give them free choice loose salt.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by  Viannah.
    TambiPamby
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 14

    Hi, I have a hard keeper and she’s 24 appendix quarter horse mare. I feed her orchard grass and some alfalfa (she gets depressed if she can’t have her beloved alfalfa from Oregon) no less than 10lbs per feeding. She also gets 3lbs of triple crown senior feed and 8oz of ground flax seed. She gets regular deworming when necessary by fecal test (rarely have to worm) and sand clear every other month as she doesn’t typically eat on sand. If you’re having a fly issue I would try chia seeds over garlic. Garlic is toxic to horses, they’re not intended to eat it and wouldn’t naturally. I have noticed my mare doesn’t get swarmed with flies as much just being on flax seed. It may also be called Lin seed. I’ve never had any issues feeding my horses sweet feed or molasses based grains year round. I live in Southern California in high desert climate. 50s-60s in the winter and sometimes as hot as 100+ in summer but usually summers are in the 90s. I’ve never had a colic issue. Hope this helps!

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Tambi, flax seed is recommended to counteract those pesky flies–which was really good news for me, because my Morgan mare is allergic to fly bites. I heard an interview with a large animal vet, and another vet who specialized in equine dermatology, and they both said, feed flax. I too live in the CA high desert!

    OP, Omaline has been around forever and is not the best way to add weight. It contains corn, which will heat up a horse, and also molasses–which will also heat up a horse. (Remember the “Twinky defense”? Sugar makes people and horses act crazy.) Straight hay plus careful supplements is usually the best way to add weight to any horse. Try to avoid alfalfa hay, as it too can make a horse “high.”

    TambiPamby
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 14

    Yeah, flax has made a huge difference in my mare. She was even sore from her DSLD and I put her on the flax and she hasn’t been as stiff and sore. Flax is great! My sisters Andalusian mare has horrible allergies and the flax really helped her immunity to counter them. I’m a firm believer.

    I agree. Feeds with corn and alfalfa just don’t do as good a job fattening a horse up. I’ve tried many things as I have 2 hard keepers. My 5-6yr old mustang mare plumped up on nutrena pro force fuel. And my quarter mare plumped up on honestly hay pellets. I Feel it’s all about the guaranteed analysis. I can’t guarantee nutrition on my hay. It seems of great quality but how can you truly know when hay growers won’t send it in. I have a 20+ year old mustang gelding that gets 3 lbs bermuda pellets and about 8-10lbs of orchard hay per feeding. He is a perfect weight. When I exercise him more I bump him with some nutrena boost rice bran pellets.

    Attachments:
    Nanner j
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I have fed my horses Total Equine feed for three years and love the results. My main barrel horse, Major, is over 22 years old but you would never know it to look at him or see him in action! The feed dissolves with their saliva making colic less likely. Total Equine also seems to have helped them to be more “muscled” looking. The recommended feeding for my horses is 4 pounds of feed, one time a day, then all the hay they want. Summer time they pasture graze and also have hay. Major looks great, the mares are fat!

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    I also de-worm with Zamectrin Gold because its the best. Some de-wormers do not get one certain worm. I can’t think of the worm right now.

    Silverchex Silverchex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    I’ve found any feeds with a high content of sugar is not so good. While they’re young you may not see the negative effects but as they age you do. High sugar is bad for the joints, digestive system etc. While it may be a faster way for weight gain it does not metabolize like fats do in the body. Even for humans sugar is bad in high content over a long period of time. Here’s an article from Dr Mark DePaolo on equine nutrition.
    http://hl.depaoloequineconcepts.com/?q=node/7

    I mix Renew Gold with whole oats. I don’t give a lot of whole oats because it is a starch but it breaks down differently in the body and creates weight gain and energy. Combined with the fats in RG…I know Dr DePaolo’s article says differently about oats but moderation and balance are always the key. My horses are keeping their weight, even my hard keepers. Renew Gold is made up of coconut meal, rice bran and flax. I have to add a mineral. I use Redmond’s Daily Gold but any chelated mineral will do. Chelated minerals absorb better.
    http://horsehealthyoats.com/why-choose-oats

    If your horse needs a boost you can feed colostrum, places like Animal Element and Forefront carry colostrum. The benefits carry a long list from strengthening the immune system against illness to helping overcome allergies like hives, better feed absorbtion etc. Read more about it here.
    https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=80&usernum=2983398634&e=info%40ForeFrontEquine.com&cname=Valued+Subscriber

    As for worming I would do fecals. The chemicals in wormers are highly destructive to the body. I feed Animal Elements Foundation Detox. It has natural worming in it and many other health benefits. I usually only use a chemical wormer once or twice a year. The rest of the time it’s the detox. They stay pretty worm free. Hope that helps!

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