Feet Going In and Out of Stirrups

This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  G & S 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • live.love.lope. Original Poster
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 5

    Hello! I’ve noticed when I’m riding English, my feet slide in and out of the stirrups when I’m posting the trot mostly, and sometimes at the canter. My feet are usually way to far in the stirrup or I am losing my stirrup. Any ideas of what might be causing this? My stirrup length is normal. Thanks!

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    I’m not sure what you mean by “normal.” The stirrup length a dressage instructor insisted I use during lessons is too long for trail riding, and since I spend most of my time trail riding, I shortened them. No more lost stirrup irons. The more leg you can put on your horse, the better you can communicate with him, but if you lose your stirrups at two out of three gaits, you’re not really communicating–you’re kicking your horse in the stomach trying to get your stirrup irons back. Good luck and let us know if shortening them helps!

    islandfjord
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    There are 4 reasons that I can think of that you may be having this problem:

    -Stirrups too long (already mentioned)
    -Not enough weight in your heels
    -Horse not carrying himself and making you work too hard and in the process you are drawing your leg up or you draw your leg up because you are not balanced enough which could happen if you are riding a new horse and you aren’t quite with the rhythm
    -Stirrup iron too wide

    Hope that helps.

    JLThunder JLThunder
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    All of the advice above is good. Do you loose both stirrups or one at a time? If it is one, I would recommend balance exercises. Most people favor one side, so balance exercises can help you focus on even balance. Work with your instructor with the possibility of lessons without stirrups too.

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Cbeck or have somebody on the ground check if you ride with your heels lower than your toes. English stirrups are designed so that if your feet are not correctly angles, and you are stretching your legs into the stirrups, your feet will not stay in the correct position. “Heals down” is still correct, however, what riders are often not told is that pushing down does not work. Stretching into the stirrups does. Not sure of the anatomical reasons for this, but stretching works, pushing down does not.

    live.love.lope. Original Poster
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 5

    Cbeck or have somebody on the ground check if you ride with your heels lower than your toes. English stirrups are designed so that if your feet are not correctly angles, and you are stretching your legs into the stirrups, your feet will not stay in the correct position. “Heals down” is still correct, however, what riders are often not told is that pushing down does not work. Stretching into the stirrups does. Not sure of the anatomical reasons for this, but stretching works, pushing down does not.

    I am not quite understanding how to do this. How do you stretch your heels down as opposed to pushing down? Thanks!

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Sorry, I don’t check this website very often anymore – too much junk ads – and I did not get an alert that there was a new post.

    Think of it as stretching the whole leg, not just pushing on your heal. Sit in a chair and PUSH your heel down against the floor, with your heel lower than your toe and your leg bent at the knee as it would be in the stirrup.

    Now sitting in the same chair, lift your foot off the floor and stretch your leg down, again with your heel lower than your toe.

    The 2 feel different.

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