Fitting a 2 year old

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by mpimentel mpimentel 2 years, 1 month ago.

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  • mpimentel Original Poster mpimentel
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    My vet and I discussed training/ light riding for my coming 3 gelding qh. My discipline will be endurance once in a while when the meets are nearby but mostly we will do trails. I would like to start him with a quality saddle and a good fit though he will widen as he matures. Looking at the Tucker trail and endurance saddles and looks like he will be a medium tree now. Does it make sense to purchase new to resell in a couple of years. I just got burned on a used saddle. I have heard Tucker holds its value well. Or should I look at cheaper new saddles for training and light riding. I imagine we won’t actually do anything but light trails until he is 5. Do you all start with he best you can afford or start with something a little less expensive knowing you will be selling in a couple of years? Also how do you protect yourself when you buy a used saddle long distance?

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Fit is probably the most important aspect of any saddle. An expensive saddle that doesn’t fit is a less desirable saddle for that horse at that stage of his or her training than a less expensive saddle that does fit. Used saddles can be a good choice, but only if the saddle fits both the horse and the rider. You seem fairly confident that your horse’s body shape will change as he matures, so if I were in your position, I would be looking for the saddle that is both the best fit and the least expensive, with fit being the more important. For example if you find 2 possibilities, and one fits better but is somewhat more expensive but still in your budget and the other one is less expensive but not as good a fit, I would go with the more expensive saddle, provided the more expensive one is in your budget range. I would also never buy a saddle, new or used, that I could not ride in several times before I purchased it.

    mpimentel Original Poster mpimentel
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    Thank you. I agree fit is the most important factor. I have been studying different saddles online for weeks and will try a demo program. No one nearby enough to ride them. Around here they are mainly western trail saddles that are stiff and weigh a lot more than what I would like too put on my horses back. I’ve also been reading online here about English saddles and looking at them – like the Stubben- and love their sleekness and attributes but am hesitant to start in one since I haven’t ridden in years am feel like I am too rusty to start in one. Something to consider when we start riding in earnest.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I have been riding in Stubbens (forward seat and dressage), and can say that I have never once been uncomfortable or had to have any part repaired. Even after not using one of them for years, it still fit like a glove and felt like a cloud. After getting one that fits your horse, be sure you take your own comfort into consideration.

    It is never the horse's fault

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    English saddles are typically lighter weight than many Western saddles, but they can be trickier to fit, as they come in a variety of tree widths, and some English saddles even have adjustable-width trees. I have very little experience with Western saddles, as I have always ridden English, but on the rare occasions that I have ridden in a Western saddle, I found they tend to lock the rider in place in ways that an English saddle does not, and thus English saddles tend to require better balance and stronger muscles than Western Saddles. Personally, I found that I did not like being locked into place, but most of my friends who ride Western do not have this reaction. If this first saddle is intended to be ONLY a first saddle, you might want to consider some of the synthetic saddles, as both Western & English synthetic saddles tend to be much lighter than their leather equivalents, as well as less expensive. They can be very good value for the money, especially if this saddle is not intended to be a “keeper”.

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    If you are riding endurance and trails, you will not make a mistake buying a Tucker, but buy a used one and if you keep it clean and in good condition, you will be able to sell it for what you paid for it, or at not much of a loss.

    I have both the Tucker Equitation and the Tucker Endurance saddles, both I bought used for about half the cost of a new one. I could sell either for exactly what I paid for it, and it wouldn’t be on Ebay or craigslist for even a week.

    Never buy synthetic for trail riding, it is a waste of money and will not hold value. It is very rare that I disagree with G&S here or Joe-Joe. But for your intended use, buy a good Tucker saddle. You are worth it and your horse is worth it. I DO ride western and I have ridden endurance, you will feel the miles in a cheap saddle, and so will your horse.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    mpimentel Original Poster mpimentel
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    Thank you all.Kantos and I will be starting very slowly with a trainer, I hope- we are moving soon but I want to keep it light for him always and quality equals a good fit for him and a good seat for me 🙂 Tucker does seem to fit those needs really well. I’m keeping an eye on eBay and will be ready to buy when I close on my house here, lol. Used, yes. Later on maybe we will try a Stubben when we are more confident, both of us. Ty Mapale for chiming in on the Tucker. I leaned toward it for the points you mention and am so relieved to see someone confirming them.

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