Frustrated and confused

This topic contains 37 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • TWH Girl Original Poster TWH Girl
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 31

    I will give him time. That’s probably the hardest thing for me, as I enjoy riding and it’s such a part of my routine. But, I do agree he needs it. My plan is 6 weeks off and then see where he is at. If I can’t show, it really doesn’t matter to me. I just want Trace to feel better.

    TWH Girl Original Poster TWH Girl
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 31

    Saphire, what are you looking at for supplements? I am currently using Smartflex III Resilience but I am very tempted to try Actiflex which SP does not carry. It’s affordable and I’ve heard many good things about it.

    Thanks for the info on the ice wraps too. Will look into those.

    This is a nice forum and much less judgemental than others I have come across. Appreciate the feedback.

    NinaJD NinaJD
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 139

    Keep us updated on him.

    "Take the time it takes, so that it takes less time."
    "Expect a lot, accept a little, reward often."
    Pat Parelli

    TWH Girl Original Poster TWH Girl
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 31

    Trace had his hocks injected on Friday with HA and a steroid. Clear, watery joint fluid came out of the right hock, so it was probably a good thing we did the injections. I am still resting him but yesterday hand walked him and he was picking up his back feet better and not dragging the toes as much. Fingers crossed for continued improvement for him.

    Rhinestone Cowgirl Rhinestone Cowgirl
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 20

    You’ve had really good and thorough responses posted, but the dragging of the toes did catch my eyes. This can also be an indication of a neurological issue and I’m wondering if you’ve already addressed that. You mentioned having vets out a few times so that may have already been ruled out, but I did want to mention it just in case you thought it worth considering. So sorry you’re going through this with your boy. I can’t imagine how frustrating to want to be able to help him when there is obviously something causing distress but not be able to pinpoint what he needs for relief. Hopefully you’ve found a solution and he is already on his way to healing and recovery.

    Western Pleasure, Hunter/Jumper, Working Cow...there's an App for that!

    hmuto
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Have you looked into ulcers? We have a lesson horse at my barn that we treat for ulcers and the way we know they are bothering him is he starts refusing to do work. He will be going along great and then for no apparent reason he will slam on the breaks and refuse to move forward. You have to turn him like you are going to ask him to circle to get him to walk forward again. He will do that a couple times a lesson and then be fine for the rest of your ride. The training that you sent him away for could have been really stressful for your horse and upset his GI track. I also treated my 18yr old TB for ulcers this past summer. He is usually a horse with a huge personality and very curious about what is going on ALL THE TIME. I noticed he was extremely sluggish when I rode and on the cross ties he seemed very depressed almost. He was not as curious and his personality went away. The vet suggested ulcers and so I treated him with gastrogaurd and gave him time off while he was getting the medication. Once he was done getting the medication he was back to his usual curious self with tons of personality and was practically running away with me when I tried to ride him again.

    This won’t help dragging his toes, that very well could be a soreness issue, but as far as his personality being different, it could be his gut.

    TWH Girl Original Poster TWH Girl
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 31

    Thank you! This summer, at training- he was on Ulcerguard. Currently, he has Tract Guard in his Smartpack as well, so although I cannot be 100% sure, I am not sure if ulcers would be the issue. Of course, there can always be more than one thing going on with horses too.

    No vet has really mentioned neuro issues. He was tested in terms of backing up and otherwise just did not seem to exhibit any other neuro symptoms. I would look into that if I fail to find a soundness issue that can explain his symptoms though.

    mmfoxfire
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Has anyone tested him for Lyme’s disease? Just a thought. Seems though Lyme’s is getting more and more prevalent in horses. Also, homeopath is another good option. My QH had a bad limp for about a year, and had homeopath out and he did chiropractics and gave him some meds for liver support and voila, he’s all better! ๐Ÿ™‚ Oh, and he did test negative for lymes at that point.

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    My heart goes out to you! I’ve been where you are. I piled up endless vet bills and cried puddles trying to figure out why my formerly stalwart and fun-loving gelding suddenly went lethargic and balky to the point where I couldn’t get him to walk forward. Walk! Not even that! And it happened in what seemed to be the blink of an eye. We were at a dressage clinic. All was perfect. We came home. The next day he was simply not my boy anymore.

    I agree with everyone who said the horse probably has pain and needs time off. In my boy’s case, it turned out to be a locked rib from a very minor incident in the trailer the day of the clinic when he pulled back against the tie because he thought I’d unclipped it. The vet/chiro who finally found the problem said it wasn’t caused by that incident, that he’d likely been a rambunctious youngster and probably did the original damage when he was around 5 and the pull just triggered the slippage. Good guess! I’ve had him all his life, and that fit him perfectly.

    Long story short, she did unlock the rib. It took three treatments with rehab exercises between to get it to stay put. I was banned from longeing him on a circle, so I ground-drove him. And after all of that, which was about a year’s work, it took about another year of consistent work with a clicker and treats to get him to stop fearing the pain and move under saddle. They have super memories for pain. *sigh* Now, some 7 years down the road, he’s pretty much back to his old self. He had LOTS of time off along the way. But finding the problem and getting his muscles balanced (he was so twisted that his right foreleg was actually atrophying) so he could work comfortably.

    Just don’t give up! My guy is back to jumping, dressage, and barrels and poles, and the only residual effect is that he still gets antsy at the mounting block. But who wouldn’t after working in pain for nearly a year?

    I have to add that two of the three vets who assessed him called it a training issue. As a result, I was hard on him trying to get him to stop “taking advantage” of me. When I told the third vet all of that, she was appalled. Her training as a chiro made it obvious when she stood behind him that his spine was curved to the right. She forgave me and the other vets for not noticing because he’s built “like a brick house”, so the bone structure isn’t as evident as it would be in a less muscular animal. I haven’t forgiven any of us.

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
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    Jennifer11051126
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Hi sorry to hear of your frustration. All of the signs you have mentioned point to lymes. The rushing at the canter, not wanting to go forward, bute and previcox having minimal effects ect. The injections you have done so far will help him in the long run. I would have him tested. Make sure you use the test that will tell you what the actual titer on your horse is. It cost more money but well worth it. If this is negative then perhaps look at kissing spine or epm. Best of luck to you and your horse.

    Jennifer11051126
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Hi so sorry to hear about your frustration. All of the things you have mentioned point to lymes. Rushing at the canter, not wanting to go forward, bute and prevecox having minimal effect. Lymes can lie dormant while the horse is not in work or in little work and the present as soon as you up the training load, travel load or show load as these are all stressful. I would have him tested to rule this out. I would also recommend the test that tells you what his lymes titer actually is. It is more expensive but worth it. Other things you might want to consider are epm and kissing spine. If the test is positive you may want to consider the Smartpak Protect Ultra to help boost his immune system and minimize internal stress. Good luck with your horse.

    TWH Girl Original Poster TWH Girl
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 31

    Wow, what great feedback from everyone, thank you all so much. The vet will be coming out in March to do routine springs shots and teeth, so by then we will know about his response to the hock injections and I can discuss with her the possibility of things like Lyme, EPM and the other thing I thought of was ESPM. I have also thought of SI issues on his spine as well. All of these things are good areas to check into if we need to go further down the line. My pocketbook (and husband) hopes we don’t have to do that though.

    DominoIsMyPal DominoIsMyPal
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    He may be sad about the other horse dieing. I had some horses like that the other never was the same

    DominoIsMyPal DominoIsMyPal
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    He may be sad about the other horse being put down. I had some horses like that. The other never was the same. :-C

    TWH Girl Original Poster TWH Girl
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 31

    I know, I have thought about that too. They were buddies- I always called them brothers since they were both my sweethearts. Both black TWH- Rambo, with a big white star on his forehead and two white socks (who actually thought he was a quarter horse, lol!) and Trace who is 16hh and a big sleek black boy white a tiny tiny white star. They were close and Trace is sort of a loner. After Rambo died, I moved pastures and moved his stall. He’s out with two other 19 yr old geldings that are brothers and he is the odd man out. It was just him and Rambo for years and Rambo took care of Trace. It makes me sad just thinking about it ๐Ÿ™ I told hubby I need a new brother for Trace!! I am actually thinking of a trotting horse this time around for something different. Anyway, I am not doing anything until I get confirmation on what is going on with Trace and get a handle on it. He’s such a dear sweet boy and deserves to be pampered right now.

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