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Help Please…anyone

This topic contains 16 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  chacomom 3 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • horsetucker Original Poster horsetucker
    Topics Started: 18Replies Posted: 25

    Ok,so I have a shetland pony and she won’t eat hay…Just to let you know she is about 34 yrs.old. Anyway in the morning I give her more than a half a scoop of grain, at noon less than a half a scoop of grain… we need help to keep her alive in the winter please help please… Were desperate:(

    !god's always lookin down on his cowgirls/boys!....HORSETUCKER

    dancersmeadow dancersmeadow
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    I also have a 34 year old that can no longer eat hay. He gets 1.5 quarts of grain 3X a day and to replace his hay he gets a combination of soaked hay stretcher, beet pulp, and alfalfa cubes 5X a day. I hope this helps.

    horsetucker Original Poster horsetucker
    Topics Started: 18Replies Posted: 25

    yes it helps alot,could you get the alfalfa cubes at tractor supply co?

    !god's always lookin down on his cowgirls/boys!....HORSETUCKER

    dancersmeadow dancersmeadow
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Yes I think you can get the alfalfa cubes and beet pulp at tractor supply, make sure to soak them before feeding :)

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    I would also highly recommend Purena Senior Feed. I had a Belgian mare that could not eat hay because she had no teeth. I started feeding her the Senior Feed and within about a week she had put on weight and was looking healthy again. Later on I also tried substituting some of the Senior Feed for beet pellets, but even with very few beet pellets mixed in she didn’t like it at all. So if your horse is a really picky eater she may not like the beet pellets.

    Yes, I know Senior Feed is a bit expensive, but it is a more complete feed than just adding extra grain would be. With my Belgian mare I went through one 50lb bag in two days(!), but that was all she could eat.

    vmullen1
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 5

    I also feed Purina Equine Senior for all my older horses. I chose this one as it could also be fed as a complete feed. My horses still have enough teeth to eat hay. In addition to any of the hay substitutes, you can also add a quarter to a half cup of vegtable oil to the Purina Senior).

    I have 2 big horses (Dutch Warmblood Mare and a Quarter Horse Gelding).

    They are the same height and weight. The mare gets a half gallon twice a day, while the gelding half a quart twice a day.

    horsetucker Original Poster horsetucker
    Topics Started: 18Replies Posted: 25

    my shetland has teeth,but its stillo a mystery why she won’t eat:(

    !god's always lookin down on his cowgirls/boys!....HORSETUCKER

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    “Purina”

    trish_hug
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 6

    My 31-year-old quarter horse gelding gets 4 pounds of Purina Equine Senior mixed with a cup of alfalfa pellets soaked for several hours so it’s soft enough to chew three times a day. He eats this up. He tries to eat hay we chop up for him in a leaf shredder but ends up quidding and spitting it out. The Equine Senior is a complete feed and no hay is necessary.

    The horse is like a bridge between the spirit world and our material world.

    horsetucker Original Poster horsetucker
    Topics Started: 18Replies Posted: 25

    thanks,i think i might try that:)

    !god's always lookin down on his cowgirls/boys!....HORSETUCKER

    NinaJD NinaJD
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 139

    I’m really against feeding purina feeds(senior especially, since it’s so high in sugar). But if you’re going to do a senior grain you can also look into Nutrena’s senior feed, it has beet pulp already in it. Or Triple crown senior(also has beet pulp in it, but has chunks, where nutrena is shredded and mixed in with the pellets) Both low in sugar, high calorie/protein for those older, hard keepers. I have all my horses on it and they do very well. I did a TON of research before I put my 18 year old on the triple crown, I’m super picky about what I put in my horses body.

    you can get nutrena at most feed stores and the hay cubes/pellets almost every feed store carries them. Most carry Standlee hay company brand(very good, high quality feed).

    I would have her teeth checked out. How long as she been doing this? Have you checked her mouth for sores? Maybe she got a bad flake with some weeds in it and hurt her mouth? Have you tried soaking her hay? See if she’ll eat it that way….

    "Take the time it takes, so that it takes less time."
    "Expect a lot, accept a little, reward often."
    Pat Parelli

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    I didn’t realize Purina was full of sugar, but now that I think about it, I guess it is. It does smell sweet, and it does have molasses in it. So, I agree with you NinaJD. (However, I’ve never used Nutrena feeds, so I have nothing to say about them.)

    It is more important with ponies and draft horses to keep an eye on the sugar content, so you may want to keep this in mind, horsetucker.

    dancersmeadow dancersmeadow
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    The sentinel senior is also low in sugar.

    http://www.sentinelfeed.com/pdfs/blueseal_sellsheet_SR.pdf

    foxylady
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    I agree with most of the above suggestions.
    Senior feed that is complete is one thing you can do & check the horses teeth.
    I would try a different kind of hay, perhaps second cut. Second cut is richer and easier to chew however, I wouldn’t suggest changing everything at once. You don’t want to create more problems. Changes should be gradual.
    Too much grain isn’t good so a senior feed with a little beet pulp and soaked hay cubes is a good way to go. I also feed my horses probios every day…it helps with digestion and the food is absorbed better. I had a 34 yr. old pony that loved wheatgrass! It was the only thing that got her to eat anything again after she stopped eating. Good luck!

    Webster
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Several years ago we had a grade QH type in our barn who had no more teeth and couldn’t eat all that well. After trying all kinds of feeds for elderly horses we were at our wits end. I had rabbits at the time and we took a look at the ingredients on the Purina Rabbit Chow bag and thought it was worth a try. That horse went on to eat rabbit chow almost exclusively for the next three or four years and died of a stroke at 38. He looked better on that feed than he had the previous ten years.

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