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Hock Injection Complication

This topic contains 10 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by pheets pheets 2 years ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • empaul02 Original Poster empaul02
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 8

    In May I had my horses hocks injected, I typically get them done and have never had a problem. This time, her hocks blew up and she was dead lame with a fever and would not eat grain for a little over a week. Now being almost three months later she is still recovering and the vet can’t tell me what exactly happened. They told me I can walk her under saddle as of right now. She is getting X-rays/ultrasound done this week. I have heard of allergic reactions and infections but they don’t seem to have such a lasting effect. I am worried she got an infection and then blew out her joint (both legs). Has this happened to anyone? If so what was the outcome and what will happen as far as soundness and work load?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Why do you have them injected? This isn’t something with which I am familiar, but it almost sounds as if it wasn’t done quite correctly.

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Joint injections are a tricky thing, even under the best of skill and conditions. Any time the synovial sheath is compromised/interrupted, the potential for infection/complication is high. Granted, some vets are better at this than others.

    Joint injections are commonly applied to arthritic conditions as well as ligament and tendon inflammation. I have had knees and hocks (arthritis) done here with good results but the aftercare and subsequent maintenance requires a watchful eye, a clean environment and careful exercise when cleared to do so.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Pheets – almost sounds like what my ortho wants to do to me, and what happened to this poor horse is why I declined the honor!

    It is never the horse's fault

    empaul02 Original Poster empaul02
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 8

    I get them injected yearly. She is an eventer and gets stiff in her hocks. Like I said I have had this done for a few years now and have never had this problem. Was just wondering if anyone experienced something similar.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Empaul02, what you describe sounds like an infection tho from my armchair here, it is only an impression, not Gospel. The more we inject, the greater the chance for something to go south, regardless of skill level/experience. Joint infections from injections are NOT the norm. Life… stuff happens. With horses, it happens more often. x 10.

    I have not had personal experience (in any of MY horses) with an injection gone bad yet (touch wood) but know of several (4) clients who have. The recovery was moderate in time spent tho the horses all recovered satisfactorily and went back, however briefly, (at this point, dialing down for a couple of them was the practical and humane way to go, the other two are still working well) to their mid to upper level jobs. Again, a watchful eye…

    I do hope that this is an isolated incident for you and your girl, that she is over it soon and that you are back out together : )

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    empaul02 Original Poster empaul02
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 8

    Pheets, thank you for you input it is sometimes hard to see an over all view when you’re directly involved. I am aware that almost no matter what is exactly was, she will develope more arthritis due to the trauma alone from the swelling, etc. Although I still have high hopes that with a little therapy and slow work she will be able to, at the minimum, work flat. And thank you for the encouragement!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    empaul and pheets – thank you both. I haven’t ever done eventing, or anything else very strenuous, so that may be why I’ve never come across this before. I hope the best recovery for your girl, and that you both get back to your normal routine quickly.

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Morning, Guys : )

    We start them too young, work them incorrectly and too hard, too fast, too high, too-too-too..ad nauseum. Thank GOODness we have all these repair products…

    This^ is a general statement, dripping with sarcasm. Most products, designed for horses and their comfort, have their place and work well enough when the right product is used for the right reason/diagnosis. Horses differ as much as the products do. Then there is the human interpretation and expectation…..

    Stuff happens no matter how hard we try to avoid and prevent. Sometimes, we are called to go the distance and fill in the blanks. Injections are a common way, albeit quite pricey, for career horses to go since feed thrus/orals are devilishly inconsistent, in result and opinion. Joint injections are designed for repair purposes which will in turn allow some comfort thus willing mobility, which is the goal.

    Arthritis is a progressive condition. It can be slowed and managed but will eventually progress thru any medication regimen. Keep her comfortable, keep her moving. With diligent care, she should be able to go back to work, albeit maybe lower levels. She is an eventer: the occasional, low pop-over will be just fine. The pain in her heart for not being able to do what she knows (on occasion and when she is up to it) and staying home will be far greater than the pain in her hocks for going out. Cold-hosing after a work can be your new best friend : D

    Small consolation for you, Empaul, my Big Mare evented (novice) in her day, with arthritis and Cushings. She was happily out there, low levels, for 5 years, injected hocks 2ice/year (with no infection results), Cosequin daily with an MSM back up. She was fine. Retired because she turned 28 and I just didn’t want her out there in the stress any more ( She started late: 20 year old… what was *I* thinking?!). I wanted her retirement to at least start out with broad comfort. She is a tad weak in the back now but shows no pain, is not medicated for pain (just her arthritis and her Cushings), gets up and down with relative ease, and still rules her herd very well at 31 years old : ) Granted, she gets a daily dose of Previcox thru the summer to help combat the pain of bug-stomping..jury still out on that.. She never suffered an infection due to injections but HAS been hit with other issues that require time off and careful recovery. Not quite the same for your mare but don’t give up hope : )

    You might consider adding a daily dose of MSM to your mare’s diet? It can keep the inflammation of daily wear and tear (and weather effects) down to a dull roar, allowing the injections to do their job more efficiently. Chat with your vet, see what they think?

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    empaul02 Original Poster empaul02
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 8

    The xrays will definitely tell us what condition her joints are in, I put this post up so I could maybe have a couple more questions ready for the vet. Pheets, she was always on a low joint supplement but I moved her to the smartpak resilience III, which seemed the be the best option. Thank you guys!

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    I hope she does well for you, Empaul, best of rides to ya!!

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

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