Hoof boots for the hind only?

This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  KiRin_Kiger 2 years ago.

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  • KiRin_Kiger Original Poster
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 9

    Our mustang KiZmet has the typical solid as steel black front hooves, but her hind hooves have the softer “white” hoof material. We are finding that her hind hooves wear faster than the front, and are possibly wearing too fast to keep her barefoot 100%. I have been reviewing hoof boots and wonder if anyone else has experience with booting just the hind feet for trail riding. I am looking at the Cavallo Sport.

    "Ride fearlessly, but think carefully"

    mtraylor67@gmail.com
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Hi there,
    I have a horse that has ALWAYS had rock solid hooves, to the point where I felt like I never had to worry about him. Well, guess what… he got a trim one day, and was lame the next. Luckily, he has recovered from his lameness, but I found an amazing farrier that specializes in natural horsemanship. He got me hooked on hoof boots. I found that the EasyBoot Glove is the strongest, best fitting boot I have ever tried. I was making my own “homemade” duct tape and baby diaper boots to help my horse with his lameness, and my farrier suggested that I put an EasyBoot on him. I almost passed out when he suggested only one! I am a type-A, everything has to be symmetrical type person, and only using one boot blew my mind, but it worked. My horse wasn’t disturbed by it, he healed properly, and now I am a firm believer in using boots. The durability was excellent, and my horse roamed the pasture with wet grass and mud. I don’t have any personal experience with Cavallo boots, but I certainly think your horse will be happy with a little extra protection on the back hooves. 🙂

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    White hooves are no softer than black ones. It is a myth. The color difference generally is due to the hair color of the leg on most horses. My mare has two white (one in front and one in back) and two black – no difference in wear and tear, trims, etc. The reasons so many people think the white ones are softer are that bruising is easier to see, and since many people wash white legs more often, that can affect the hoof.

    That said, if your farrier or vet thinks you should use boots, go for it.

    It is never the horse's fault

    KiRin_Kiger Original Poster
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 9

    Considering I am the farrier, I will consider hoof boots if I see excessive wear. Regarding the “myth”, the hoof color does indeed indicate potential differences in composition. In our horse KiZmet’s case, it happens to be true. Her front hooves (solid black) are denser and more brittle than her back hooves (white). As her farrier, I notice a definite difference when trimming and rasping them.

    "Ride fearlessly, but think carefully"

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I guess it is a matter of opinion – my farrier says otherwise. Or, perhaps, it varies from horse to horse, depending on a multitude of factors.

    It is never the horse's fault

    rhonda007@rocketmail.com
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I trail ride and pack into the back country of Colorado and Wyoming. You may want to consider Renegade Hoof Boots. They are made right here in the USA by a husband and wife team that endurance ride. Who cares what color the hoof is, if you need a boot, you need a boot. I have been using these boots for 8yrs now without any problems. They go thru thick “sucky” mud without coming off and have given the necessary protection/traction needed going through rock avalanche fields. I have never had a “rub”. I put them on all four feet or just which ever foot may need it. If your horse is used to boots, he doesn’t care that it is on one foot or all, that’s a human thing.

    Wind_Dancer
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 14

    This is an interesting topic. I never thought it would be a good idea to boot just one foot since hoof balance is so important, I figured it would be like me wearing one shoe only and cause problems. I have Cavallo trek boots for my mare just for the front right now and they fit great, are SO easy to put on, and help her move so much better because she is more comfotable.

    She has white feet which I can definitely say are worse than all my other horse’s feet (not sure if its because they are white or because she just has bad feet. I do not wash her legs regularly just groom them) and she is very flat footed – despite careful trimming her hooves start pancaking out if I don’t do light trims on her every two weeks in the spring/summer/fall (winter she can go longer). She also bruises easily and gets abscesses easily. The Cavallo boots so far have stayed on well (only had them for a month or so) and seem very comfortable for her. I use the pastern wraps with them as she has sensitive skin and i didn’t want to take a chance on her getting rubs on her heel or anything and I also use the gel insoles. I’m planning to order two more for her hind feet this week.

    For the person who said they just used one easy boot glove on a hind foot, did you turn your horse out in the boot as well? My mare is recovering from an abscess on her right hind and although the abscess is popped it caused a large amount of her heel/back quarter of her hoof to become unstable because of the track it made when it popped and I had to remove part of it. I have been keeping her hind foot wrapped with cotton/vetwrap/duct tape but a boot would be so much easier if it would stay on, just to protect it while it grows out. I didn’t consider that before because I thought it could cause problems to boot only one foot, but it sounds like several people have done it with no problems.

    I do have a friend who uses the renegade hoof boots and LOVES them. I don’t have any experience booting only the hind feet…would that transfer more weight to the forehand since it would make the hind end a little higher? Please keep us updated on what you decide, I would love to know how it works so I can keep that filed away for future reference!

    I'd rather be riding! www.whispertraining.com

    cheryl_nuez
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    I am quite surprised that your mustang has soft feet – white or black. As Joe-Joe says, colour has nothing to do with it, rather there are other factors involved, according to several vet and nearly every shoer I have ever had.
    However, of all the mustangs I have dealt with, I have yet to have one with soft feet.
    My current mustang competes in combined driving, a sport requiring dressage, marathon and obstacles and twisty cones courses. The sport demands a fair amount of conditioning, for distance, aerobic and anaerobic, as well as suppleness. She goes barefoot year round.

    Other mustangs I have had were Tevis Cup, endurance, 3-day eventing, and even a stadium jumper. None have even worn shoes. Quite the opposite, in fact: farriers would beg me to soak their hooves for days before their trims. One of my students has a barn filled with Kigers, some of whom do have a white hoof or two, and is also a farrier. He will tell anyone:
    “and THEN you think, finally a white hoof! But nope – just as tough as any black hoof.”
    Another student brings mustangs to his place for gentling, breaking and rehoming. Again, a farrier. His horses nearly all have at least 2, and generally 4 white hooves, none of them wear shoes, all the hooves tougher than the nails, he says.

    With due respect to the farrier involved, I would consider some feed changes. If the front hooves are brittle, the rear soft, the whole deal sounds like a HOOF issue on both ends. Perhaps a hoof supplement might be considered?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Good post Cheryl.

    It is never the horse's fault

    KiRin_Kiger Original Poster
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 9

    So far KiZmet’s hooves have remained hard enough to last without boots. The extreme summer temperatures we endured this year (100+ frequently) made them all more dry and brittle. Not so much on my Kiger (hooves of iron), but KiZmet’s hooves showed a bit of cracking. We kept that minimal by using E3 hoof oil (natural non-petroleum/mineral oil) frequently.

    As for mustangs, there aren’t many left that are true mustangs with the old blood (small, wiry, tough with typically long manes/tails). The BLM has seen to that with selective round-ups and domestics have been introduced. Our KiZmet doesn’t have near the hoof strength as our previous Cold Springs mustangs, but are still tougher than most domestics.

    So far, no boots, but I suspect we will be looking at the Renegades and Cavallos if the winter proves too wet this year.

    "Ride fearlessly, but think carefully"

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