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horse eats his poop

This topic contains 8 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  dja 3 years ago.

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  • dja Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 0

    EWWWWWWWW!!!!!!! This is so gross! My daughters PB 5 year old arabian stallion eats his poop. He goes in the same spot every time. He backs up against the wall of his stall and poops. Not right away or all the time but often and at random times we will catch him eating it. Not a lot but enough that he does chew it. Just kind of messes with it and it ends up in his mouth. Is he lacking something in his diet, bored, has developed a gross habit or what? His stall is picked at least once a day and completely changed once a week. Any ideas as to why he does this and most importantly, how to stop him will be greatly appreciated. Help PLEASE!

    Rhinestone Cowgirl Rhinestone Cowgirl
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 20

    There are a few issues to consider, and yes boredom may play a part. Of course, maximizing turn-out time if possible would help with the boredom. Secondly, horses have a chew urge, and if he is stalled full time he may not be able to satisfy it , especially if he is only fed two or three times a day. One solution is to provide him with hay at all times, best accomplished using a slow-feeder, such as a hay net with small holes. SmartPak carries one, and there are several other retail sources as well. Third, ulcers can cause horses to eat odd things. Saliva produced by chewing helps ease the pain in their stomach. It is not uncommon for horses with ulcers to eat bedding and manure when hay was not present in their stall. In addition, feeding a balanced diet is essential for the horse’s health. Lack of a balanced diet has been known to cause horses to eat manure as well. Studies have found that horses with pica–a propensity for consuming non-food items like manure or wood–have lower iron and copper blood levels than horses who restricted themselves to food items only. By making a few management changes you should be able to resolve the underlying cause. Some try to prevent the behavior such as by cross tying a horse in their stall, but this doesn’t address the underlying issue. By treating the possible causes you should be able to stop the behavior all together.

    Western Pleasure, Hunter/Jumper, Working Cow...there's an App for that!

    angie_bauer
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    I would recommend feeding a multi vitamin in with his grain. My mare will eat poop and wood and lots of other random things when she is off her multi vitamin. If it is a nutritional deficiency you should know within a week of giving the supplement.

    NinaJD NinaJD
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 139

    does he get grain? Some horses will pick through their poop to get to undigested grain.
    If he’s stalled all day it could be from boredom. Maybe put a hanging toy in his stall.
    And as the others said, maybe try a free feed with him so he has hay all day.
    If he’s stalled all the time, is there anyway to make him a larger turn out?

    "Take the time it takes, so that it takes less time."
    "Expect a lot, accept a little, reward often."
    Pat Parelli

    maximomd
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    I HAVE TRIED NETS HE EATS THEM ALL THE TIME I HAVE TRIED METAL HEY HANGERS HE KNOCKS THEM OUT EVEN BOLTED DOWN! HE TEARS THEM RIGHT OFF THE WALL!! I GIVE HIM HAY CONSTANTLY WHEN I FILL HIS WATER BUCKET HE WILL KICK IT OVER ITS THE BIG PLASTIC ONE I LOVE THE GUY BUT HES BORED I GIVE HIM TOYS BUT HE DOES NOT KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH THEM AND YES EATS HIS POOP TOO SO WHAT IS NEXT TO TRY?
    I DONT GIVE HIM ROLLED HAY TO MUCH OF WAIST TRIED IT SO I GIVE HIM BAILED HAY FOUR TIMES A DAY TRY TO LET HIM OUT BUT TOO COLD TO STAND OUT THERE WITH HIM AND MY YARD IS NOT FENCED FOR NOW HE KNOCKS DOWN THE HORSE METAL FENCE ANYWAY BEEN THERE DONE THAT.ANY IDEAS?

    alison_henritze
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Here are my ideas. The first thing is you should do a self-assessment on how you are caring for your horse and honestly answer these questions: is his stall getting cleaned properly? Any feces left around more than twelve hours is something I would prefer not to have with any horse. It makes the barn smell. Ditto for urine. You could always do a mini muck if much of the straw or bedding is still good. Does he get enough food and water? Does he get enough time out to keep him from getting bored?

    Now, someone mentioned supplementing, I think that’s okay, but I’d really like my vet to do a physical and blood workup of a horse that has suddenly started to coprophage. If there is a physical ailment, no amount of supplementing will help until that’s been cured!

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 474

    Lack of vitamin K has also been attributed to coprophagia. I have a mare in my yard that has started this buffet diet and I am 99% sure it is associated with a long term antibiotic regimen that she just finished (Lyme). She is now getting SmartDigest to “put the good bugs back” into her system. Plenty of good info here in this thread : )

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    rebelene57
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I found this article very informative. When I read it today, I thought of you and your horse.
    http://www.thehorse.com/articles/32148/unusual-eating-behaviors-in-horses-explained

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