Hot Arabian Mare Problems

This topic contains 25 replies, has 21 voices, and was last updated by riding for Christ riding for Christ 1 year, 10 months ago.

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  • erinclancy3 Original Poster erinclancy3
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    Hi! I lease an 19 year old Arabian Mare and she is super sweet. I have been riding her for over 3 years now. Recently, under saddle, she has been very excited and worked up. It’s much more than normal. Getting her to stay at a trot is a challenge especially. I lunge her before every ride and that helps some. But as soon as I ask for the trot she thinks shes off to the races and tries to jump to a canter. When I circle her or half-halt with her she gets upset and will either pull or throw her head up. She used to listen to me beautifully, but now I feel she refuses to listen to me. I am getting concerned and feel I make her uncomfortable as this has been happening for quite a few months now. Please help! Thank you very much!

    Erin Clancy

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Check out the post I just made to Joe-Joe’s topic of her horse lacking speed control in the show ring. This technique does work well with Arabians.

    erinclancy3 Original Poster erinclancy3
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    Thank you so much that is a really great idea and technique!

    Erin Clancy

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    If you teach yourself to tense & un-tense these muscles in groups by practicing tensing and un-tensing them while watching TV, or while riding in a car (probably not driving, at least until you learn to do it) it will be easier to teach this to your horse. It can take some practice to tense & un-tense these muscles in groups. Keep in mind that “shutting a horse down” by the riding locking all 4 groups of muscles is a discipline, to be used when the horse refuses to listen or even take the rider’s commands seriously. Once the horse gets the hang of this technique, it should only be used when the horse is seriously ignoring the rider’s requests/commands. When you normally ride with very soft contact, the bit will be floating in the horses mouth, matching his forward momentum. When you tense & lock all 4 sets of muscles, the horse literally runs into the bit, and it will, at the least, be uncomfortable. It isn’t literally running the horse into a wall, but it can feel like that to the horse. When you start teaching this, you may have to calm the horse down after shutting him/her down, and then try again. It is also critical that the hand & elbow position not change. For this to work correctly, it has to be done solely by tensing & un-tensing muscles.

    freyamae freyamae
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 5

    this reminds me exactly of when i used to lease an arabian mare, she was all for going fast as soon as i asked for a trot. The only thing that helped her stop this was riding on the lunge in trot for a couple lessons, Shan (my old horse) responded to the lunge very well which meant when i stopped trotting on the lunge she had remembered not to canter off. Hope this helped 🙂

    erinclancy3 Original Poster erinclancy3
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    Thank you both so much for the advice I really appreciate it! I will give them a try 🙂

    Erin Clancy

    ShilohsGirl ShilohsGirl
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 49

    I love mares. While they can be a bit testy and bratty at times, once you form a bond, thry will jump through fire for you.
    I love using The Herbal Horse’s moody mare essectial oil stuff. It works magic on every mare I have tried, and it is calming.
    Sometimes on a green horse, I like to ask for the canter over a ground pole or a small cross rail.
    Hope this helped.

    "Think of riding as a science, but love it as an art" ~George Morris

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I have found that putting either of mine on a longe line tends to make them worse (possibly because it wakes them up?). Each horse is an individual. Can you try asking her to trot on a diagonal, or a figure 8? Something a little different from your normal routine, so she has to think instead of just getting it over with as quickly as possible? We do a lot of small circles, in different places, some lateral work and some straight line (down the center of the ring), including asking for a halt at various times for no good reason (horse’s perspective). It doesn’t always work the way I would like it to, but that is my fault, and when it does work there is a huge difference, because we have to pay attention to what we are doing.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Bayleysmom Bayleysmom
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    One thing to always check out when dealing with a change in behavior is a physical problem. It could very well be that her back or body is sore, or her saddle is no longer fitting quite right. Since Arabs are so very sensitive, it would probably not take much for her to re-act to something physically bothering her. Good luck and am interested to hear how she is doing now.

    Bridges Equestrian
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Hi Erin, have you ruled out that this girl is not back sore? given what you’re describing, and that it is a new situation, my first inclination is that as she is experiencing some sort of discomfort; either back or lower neck. The fact that she’ll trot fine on the lunge is another clue to me. When she trots on the lunge, is she stretching her neck down? Since this is a new thing with her, I would want to rule out that she’s not trying to tell you something before you do a lot of retraining. Good luck to you and her both.

    amanda_matusak
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    You also may want to check her teeth/have them floated… her new reaction when you try half halt etc could mean the bit is hitting them differently because they’ve grown out.

    KYlewis
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    If you’ve ruled out any physical problems (have you checked her teeth/bit?), I’d work on lots of transitions and getting her to relax. Take lots of walk breaks, lots of change of direction/bend, maybe even work her over ground poles, etc. Even on the lunge line to. Anything that can get her thinking about what you want. I have a 23 yr old arab mare that frets a lot. I always have to remind myself to have soft hands and a supportive leg while half-halting and that usually helps.

    gailstpeter@comcast.net
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Hey! I’ve ridden a crazy mare and I sympathize for you but I’ve been working out a similar problem with the horse I’m training. When you pick up the trot your horse starts anticipating the canter so she gets excited and won’t listen to the rein aid. Keep calm haha switch to your seat aids deepen and slow your posts down even if she ends up in a slow jog it’s better than running. Feel free to talk to her as well (even if you get funny looks haha) when she does listen tell her how pleased you are “Pretty girl! You’re so smart”. I also find it keeps my mind clear and focused when I talk to my horse. Also switch up the exercise because she might be thinking if I canter I can just finish up my ride and go eat so throw in leg yields, loops, or something very different because then she will have to listen for your aids on what to do. If you feel like she just is not listening circle her and find a specific spot to do transitions from trot to walk and walk to trot also throw in some half circles to get her listening. Remember to breathe to keep calm and focused on her alone if you do get frustrated just take a break and clear your thoughts. Good luck and hope this helps 🙂

    kari_appleton
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    The first thing I thought of was if there have been any changes in diet. Have you started her on any new supplements or are you feeding a new type of grain? This can change the horses behavior significantly because the added calories, carbs etc can make her more energetic. Just a thought.

    lexi_sumski
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I have a 26 year old Arabian mare. Your horse reminds me of her. She was calm when she wasn’t worked frequently and as she built more muscle she became hotter. You would never guess that she was 26! I think it might run in the breed, but what I began doing was, I worked her for a longer time at a trot since she had more energy than before. I also would ask her to go into a trot in small round pen where she did not have enough space to canter. I found it works to meet her in the middle and allow her to canter sometimes but trot others. Here’s a picture from the other week

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