How to get mud out of horse's coat

This topic contains 20 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  randy_buckler 1 year, 9 months ago.

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  • adafrog Original Poster adafrog
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 5

    My 5yo Lusitano/Andalusian has the most interesting, soft winter hair I’ve ever felt. He feels like a fuzzy teddy bear. The problem is that that sweet soft teddy bear hair soaks up mud like a sponge.

    It doesn’t just clump on the end like regular horse hair, it clods and pulls into the fluffy coat. Even after a metal curry, then a rubber curry it will not come out. There are little balls of dirt left behind. (Not to mention a pissed horse).

    Other than a shower-which doesn’t work it’s freezing, or blanketing-which I *really* don’t want to do, how can I deal with this?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Horses like to be dirty. The only other thing I can suggest is just picking it out by hand (gently) where it might interfere with tack. The first thing mine do when I turn them out after grooming is to find the wettest possible place to roll in so they can be nice and filthy again. I do not know why they do this, but I do know the frustration.

    It is never the horse's fault

    mandy_patchen
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    I had a horse whom I thought was the world’s dirtiest horse. Although he was extremely neat about his stall, when it came to his body, he loved to me caked from head to toe in crusted mud. Sometimes only his eyes would be mud free. I did blanket he m as early as possible but in the spring I would sometimes walk into the barm and people would ask if I was there to ride. When I said yes, they would laugh and say they were so sorry because they had seen him in his paddock wearing a lovely mud crust. Did I mention he was grey? I found two answers. 1) a warm bath and heat lamps. 2) a vacuum. Both worked extremely well. Good luck!

    adafrog Original Poster adafrog
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 5

    My filly never waits for mud. She rolls even if her stall’s been changed.

    adafrog Original Poster adafrog
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 5

    My filly never waits for mud. She rolls even if her stall’s been changed.

    I had a horse whom I thought was the world’s dirtiest horse. Although he was extremely neat about his stall, when it came to his body, he loved to me caked from head to toe in crusted mud. Sometimes only his eyes would be mud free. I did blanket he m as early as possible but in the spring I would sometimes walk into the barm and people would ask if I was there to ride. When I said yes, they would laugh and say they were so sorry because they had seen him in his paddock wearing a lovely mud crust. Did I mention he was grey? I found two answers. 1) a warm bath and heat lamps. 2) a vacuum. Both worked extremely well. Good luck!

    I should have thought of heat lamps. I wonder what he would do with a vacuum. hmm….more *learning*!! lol
    I was just considering a bot block, maybe.

    Thanks. IT seems like you also need luck with the mud ball.

    Kathy D Kathy D
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    Well, at first I though you might just need a hand held curry(the old fashioned ones) and lots of elbow grease. Then a stiffer body brush… But (with a HUGEb but), then I took a better look at the pictures you posted. Yeah, I bet he’s p**ed when your done. It looks like it is actually taking some hide with it…. Maybe you could try some kind of leave in like Cowboy Magic or even Healthy Coat (The pink stuff that you mix with water) and see if that loosens the balls up…. I have a great product that I use in place of C.M. Maybe that will help. Then throw a sleezy and sheet on him…. It will get dirty, but at least you won’t have sore arms from scrubbing or a crabby horse…… Just my 2 cents..

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    I use a stiff brush held at an angle and don’t bear down, brush using a whisking motion with your right hand, then follow with the massaging soft brush with your left hand. You could try a sturdy sponge soaked in warm water this time of year. But probably the most important in mud season is finishing off the non saddle areas with Show Sheen to help repel future dirt.

    The brisk brush shouldn’t rake skin, and then the massage brush should feel good while bringing up the natural oils that will help you keep the dirt off. Also the adherence of mud can be caused by over-washing your horse by eliminating the much needed oils in his coat. Don’t use soap as this dries out the coat.

    Don’t use Show Sheen on the saddle area or your saddle might slip – but it is a great deterrent and cuts down grooming time.

    I have mudpuppies – and we’ve started early with mud season. It’s a struggle, and one reason I’m glad to have bay horses.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    adafrog Original Poster adafrog
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 5

    Hi guys, thanks for the posts. Here’s the update.
    I took sopping wet cloth in warm water, and ran it over the little balls. Waited less than a minute, then gently curried out the mud. No complaining!

    pflady
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Don’t buy an expensive horse vacuum. A woman at the barn where I used to board had a second-hand shop vacuum, and her pinto horse had the loveliest white spots after vacuuming. He didn’t seem to mind it at all.

    adafrog Original Poster adafrog
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 5

    Shop vac sounds good. And there are car attachments. lol

    foxrunfarm
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    First the coat sounds strange for this breed as I own and breed Andalusians. Was she clipped? Ouse two products that work well. Miracle Groom and WOW. WOW works to break up biological material and is also great on yellow tail and green or manure spots without washing. Wash and rinse tail, spray WOW and leave in. Voila overnight Miracle Groom works well, too without washing. Follow directions. Use your warm wet cloth solution to remove crusty stuff then deeper clean with MG.

    foxrunfarm
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Heat lamps are dangerous!! Use with ultimate caution!! A LOT of barn fires are caused by heat lamps left unattended plus they get VERY HOT VERY QUICKLY. Can overheat animals quickly as well. I won’t allow them in my barn. Just too much risk.

    lza_swensen
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I have had pretty good luck with a fine toothed comb… we have some pretty sticky clay-based mud out here and it will hang tough through days unless I gently comb it out. Good luck!

    adafrog Original Poster adafrog
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 5

    No, he’s never been clipped. Blanketed a little last year, that’s all.
    Never heard of WOW. Sounds cool.
    Thanks.

    justjen58 justjen58
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    You might want to rule out any type of metabolic or dietary issues that may be causing the unusual coat condition. I had a mare who had an unusual winter coat far before she was diagnosed with Equine Metabolic Syndrome or EMS. Upon dietary changes to control the disease, the unusual coat condition went away. However, chances are your horse just feels better after a good roll in the mud. Try to let it dry and then give him a squirt with Show Sheen and rake it out.

    Any time spent with horses doing anything is a good time!

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