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How to…. lease a horse?

This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Appydragon 3 years ago.

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  • danihol13 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 2

    Hello! Due to unforeseen finacial circumstances, I am looking to possibly sell or lease my horse. Problem is.. I have never been directly involved with a lease, so I am not 100% sure how those arrangements work. I hate to sell my mare, but I don’t feel like I am doing her any good by not having the time/resources that she deserves. I know in a couple of years I will be back on my feet and better able to train/work/care for her, but I am trying to come up with a solution until then. I guess my question for you all is what are some guidelines for leasing horses, or suggestions you could make as to the best way to go about a lease? Also, what are some things that are sort of “expected” out of the original owner within a lease agreement? Any and all advice is welcome!

    ottbrider ottbrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 33

    Hi! I can be of help coming from the leasing side as I lease two wonderful geldings since their owner doesn’t quite have enough time to ride since she’s working a lot. I do own my own horse as well so I understand not wanting to sell and all but a lease can be tricky, there are different kinds of leases; full-lease, half-lease, and free-lease are among the most common. I do what’s called a half-lease. I pay a monthly fee to ride up to 3 days a week. No more than that. That’s a half lease and the horse stays on their property. Now a full-lease is basically they can ride however many days they can or want to (if I’m correct) for a monthly fee and the horse usually stays with the owner, but arrangements can be made to move him/her. A free-lease is not necessarily “free” as it’s more of an option like a full lease. The free lease however is a little more lenient. You can do a free-lease type where they pay for feed, feet, vet, etc. or they can lease the horse on their property for a monthly fee or pay for feed, feet, or vet while you still keep up with the other parts feed, feet, vet, which ever the leasee doesn’t do. Now I can’t say all this is 100% accurate as I’ve only ever done a half-lease. But I think these are some good general guide lines for you. Make sure you have your agreement and liability forms signed and work out who’s responsible for what so there’s no problems occurring during the lease. I love leasing and it can be a great experience for owner and the person leasing if it’s done right. Hope this helped! Happy leasing!

    No horse is incapable of learning- riders are just incapable of teaching

    danihol13 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 2

    Ah! THANK YOU! Such helpful advice! In terms of contracts/liabilities/forms, would you recommend drafting my own, or consulting a lawyer? I don’t much want to go to a lawyer unless absolutely necessary, but I also want to make sure I cover my butt too. I’m sure I could get a trainer in my area to help me with this part of it, but what is the norm for who and/or how these contracts are designed? I use “norm” as a relatively loose term– I know each situation can be VERY different, as is true for anything in the horse world! :) Just trying to make sure I do my homework on this before I make a decision.

    ottbrider ottbrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 33

    Alright well this website here allows you to create your own horse lease form/agreement as well as providing a sample one for you to see. http://www.rocketlawyer.com/document/horse-lease.rl

    No horse is incapable of learning- riders are just incapable of teaching

    ottbrider ottbrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 33

    I’m not sure if a liability form is included but you can google a horse liability form and find TONS of them. I guarantee you’ll come across something as simple as changing the name on the top.

    No horse is incapable of learning- riders are just incapable of teaching

    danihol13 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 2

    Great! Thank you so much!

    ottbrider ottbrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 33

    You’re welcome, happy leasing!

    No horse is incapable of learning- riders are just incapable of teaching

    maddyhorsey
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 12

    Are you looking to do do full lease of partial? On or off site? Sorry it is just easier for me to help if I know that.

    cschalk
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    make sure you have in part of the agreement that you are able to still have access to the horse and you are still in charge of the basic needs and talk about what the leaser will pay for: vet bills, coggins, farrier, shots…etc

    Appydragon
    Topics Started: 12Replies Posted: 22

    I would be careful with off site leases. I leased out my old mare once, it only lasted a month. The leaser admitted to essentially beating my horse into the trailer to move her to a new barn (that I did not authorize the leaser to move her to). There were several other red flags that came up as well, and so I went and picked her up. She loaded right up into my trailer, and I never let her out of my sight again. I have personally done two on-site leases and the basics were, I was responsible for a portion of the board (both horses were used a couple times a week in a lesson program), and since I wanted to show I was responsible for getting shots and coggins done. Both leases included use of tack, but I owned a lot of my own stuff so the only things I used were their bridles.

    Sydney, Appaloosa x Draft cross

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