Keeping a horse on a dry lot

This topic contains 8 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Toran 1 year, 5 months ago.

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  • Appydragon Original Poster
    Topics Started: 12Replies Posted: 22

    I am getting some conflicting information about treating horses for sand. Some of the newer studies seem to indicate that feeding horses products such as sand clear have no effect on them or help them as far as clearing out sand from the digestive tract. So, what should I do for the inevitable fact that she will be ingesting sand (hay is fed on the ground)? Anything? Nothing?

    I am also curious about adding a probiotic, or something else to my mare’s daily routine. This is the first year that she will spend all spring-fall on a dry lot. Are there any concerns or precautions I should take?

    Sydney, Appaloosa x Draft cross

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Can you get a hay feeder or even hang a hay net, to keep the hay off the sand? I give all my horses Probios and psyllium (sp?), but never have had a problem with them ingesting sand. They may do it, but we’ve had no problems.

    It is never the horse's fault

    laura_herzog
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Hi there! Very cute App! I have two myself!

    I live in Florida where sand is always an issue, even when grass is present. Five years ago I came across a study from the university of kentucky that found it took something like 3/4 cup of water from a horses digestive system to digest and move 1 cup of grain. They suggested soaking feed in water and making it soupy. More water than grain type mix. This works for me. I have not had sand issues or even gas colic in those past five years! I do feed my hay from nets, but they always end up picking through the ground for whatever it is they can find.

    My suggestions would be to follow the water addittion in all feedings, keep them on as much hay as they want to avoid the ground picking. If you can offer free choice bundles out in the field it it most like actual grazing for them, as they will migrate from pile to pile.

    I have not supplemented my feed program with any psyllium or oils, no bran mashes or the like. I feed a soaked alfalfa cube/beet pulp/quality mix chaf type soaked to soup. They love it! My gelding gets this look in his eyey when he drinks in the flavored water. Lol good luck!

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    tahoe2001
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Good morning, had this very thing happen to my Belgian mare Sage….she’s completely food driven and we had her in the “Jenny Craig” pen, gravel bottom…she hoovers up everything, she was eating off the ground for about 3 months, 1 day she completely changed, long story short, had to rush her into surgery, 25 POUND BLOCK OF SAND in her colon…key to her success was we moved very fast and saved her…$7,000 later, and 8 years now, she’s ok, but has a humongous scar and is pretty healthy, except Cushing’s now….please, feed from a feeder and minimal on the ground, keep exercising to move things through, take a water bottle, but some manure, a small amount, 1/2 water, swish around, let it settle, look on the bottom to see the sand….hope this helps

    ride and drive
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    I have been using Sand Clear for over 13 years where we live. I swear by it. Our vet highly recommended it since we have a sandy soil. I do have hay mangers, but horses are horses. Our one horse takes the hay out to graze on the ground. Even with hay nets or bags, horses nibble anything on the ground. We do have 2 rotating pastures. During winter I feed them 2 feedings in stalls to prevent hay waste. I uses Sand Clear monthly from April to Nov after soil softens.

    Appydragon Original Poster
    Topics Started: 12Replies Posted: 22

    She is on pasture board with a few other horses, so there isn’t a ton that I can do to change how hay is given. 🙁

    She has PSSM (the reason why she is on a dry lot), and gets oil in her grain. Its so soupy I can’t imagine putting more liquid in it. Hopefully the oil will help keep things moving?

    I will try doing the poop – water test and see where we stand.

    Sydney, Appaloosa x Draft cross

    fourdcattle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Sometimes you can’t keep them from eating sand. We have very sandy land and the horses pick up sand by picking up “scraps.” I was concerned about this myself so asked my vet. He suggested rice bran or wheat bran in the feed. Not very expensive and adds fiber to diet. This is what he does for his horses so I do it. So far with great results. My horses are lucky enought to have a large pasture to graze in for 12 hours a day. I believe this helps also.

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    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    ride and drive – Sand Clear is psyllium, with some flavoring. The only real difference is the cost.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Toran
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    A slow feeder might be something to check out. The hay is off the ground so horses don’t ingest sand. We bought the plans from this company:
    http://www.grazingbox.com/howitworks.htm
    My husband modified it and made two boxes (for use in two stalls) rather than one long one. (We have two horses). Our horses understood immediately how to use it. No hay waste. No sand worries. We don’t have super cold winters in the Pacific NW, so I don’t worry about their mouths on the wire grate. But I have seen pictures of the same wire grate with a coating of some kind. The video shows the woman fluffing the hay. I don’t fluff the hay. In fact, I stand it on end so it takes more time to get it out and keeps my gelding occupied a bit longer.

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