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Mustang Training Tips NEEDED

This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 2 years, 10 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • DominoIsMyPal Original Poster DominoIsMyPal
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    I am adopting a black filly mustang she stands 14 hands and I pick her up next week, but I NEED training tips. Please leave your input

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    This sounds like an adventure! I hope all goes well getting her and I hope she settles in to her new home well too. :)

    As far as training goes, I would suggest watching some of Missy Wryn’s horse training videos. They are online and you can watch them for free! She has a lot of different videos so I’m sure you can find some that will be of help to you. Here is a link to her website and her “Training the Whole Horse” series videos. http://www.site.missywryn.com/Missy_Wryn_s_Horse_Training.html

    Would love to hear updates on how things go!

    DominoIsMyPal Original Poster DominoIsMyPal
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    okay thanks I will do that

    DominoIsMyPal Original Poster DominoIsMyPal
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    does anyone else have any tips she will be halter broke but is still wild

    naturalpasture
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 61

    Well, I already put in my 2 cents, but I do have another suggestion for you. :)
    Once you get her, I would spend 20 minutes a day, for about a week, simply putting her halter on, leading her to a spot (that’s where she starts to see you as her leader), and brushing her/spending time with her. This will help her to associate both you and the halter with good times! Then the next week, do the same thing but ask her to move every 3 to 5 minutes or so of grooming. Maybe back up one time, move her front feet away from you the next time, move her hind quarters the next time, ask her (with a little pressure on the lead rope) to lower her head, etc. She will start respecting you as a very good leader – you’re combining moving her feet and attention and love.

    Each week -or slower if she needs it – you can introduce a little more training.

    Any specific training things you’re wondering about?

    Someone else have thoughts?

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    First, congratulations on your new partnership:D This can be a fabulous experience under the right circumstances!

    This method below has brought me good luck and efficient management with the few rowdies that have past thru here but it is certainly NOT the ONLY way to do it. Be careful, thoughtful, KNOW when to ask for LIVE help as the internet can only offer conversation. That alone is by no means enough to initiate a training programme.

    When she gets home, limit her exposure at first to only the bare essential people, like yourself, for the first few days, this will minimize her confusion as to who’s in charge. Put her in an enclosure and give her hay away from the fenceline, and water, of course. Best to pre set all of this BEFORE she gets there. In the HORSE world, we are a natural threat, as we are above them in the food chain. We are predatours, they are prey and know it. This thought is in the front of her head and she will understandably be quite unsure of you and most of the rest of her surroundings at first. This is ok but to get her past it, invite her to see what you are doing. Sit at the fenceline and have something small and a tad noisy in your hand to spark her curiosity.

    Let her come to you, say nothing, don’t move or move ever slowly (as long as she doesn’t test or approach assertively..be safe, first of all). Do not touch at first, just tell her “good girl” quietly and walk away for the first few days. As she gets quicker to greet you, offer the back of your hand if her ears are up and she is “soft”, no treats yet: you want her to come to YOU, not the cookie. This will be your gauge for her confidence in your intention to NOT eat her; ) Just hang with her for a while, until she shows interest, then apply yourself and your desires slowly, calmly, consistently and clearly. Introduce her to your world gently, she has seen little of it and has no way of knowing her place in it : ) Good luck with this trip, it can be a grand one!!

    The best tip I can give you, for your safety and the success of your filly, would be to consult with a good and reputable, and I can’t stress enough: LIVE trainour.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    If I were in your boots, I’d find a good trainer. It’s much harder to fix a badly trained horse than to train it properly at the beginning. It’s worth the investment, and with a trainer, you can get live, hands-on instruction.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    DominoIsMyPal Original Poster DominoIsMyPal
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    okay This has all been working and now how do I get her used to my 25+ appaloosa gelding?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Horses are naturally inclined to enjoy the companionship of other horses. I would turn them out in adjoining paddocks so that they can meet one another with a fence to keep them both safe. Will they be in the same barn? Can they have adjoining stalls? Often, when one has only two horses, the real problem arises when one takes one out to do something. The one left behind can become very upset at being left alone, and even the one with which you are working may also be upset. Better to have three, if you can manage that (you don’t need to actually own the third). The other suggestions are all excellent, particularly getting assistance. I have known people who raised horses from birth, and at 7 they are still “seeds” – have not even reached the stage of being green, because they wanted to do it all alone and, as a result, have done nothing much.

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Agree with Joe-Joe, natcherally : ). Adjoining paddocks with a flake of hay thrown at the fence line. Have a separate pile of hay set away so she can feel safe while eating (not forced into another horse’s company just to eat). Hoping she will venture toward her new friend and eventually sample the hay under the fence near the other horse. When/if they get to the point that they will share that one flake together, you can try putting her out with him. You will know pretty quick if they will get along or not, even before you put them together.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Thank you pheets!

    It is never the horse's fault

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