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This topic contains 21 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 2 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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  • Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I am bemused. Have just purchased another horse (of course, an Arabian). She is a lovely black mare, age 13, and sensible. She goes frontwards on trails and is calm in traffic. Knows some basic dressage, and is a great fit. Of course, she isn’t Joe Joe, and certainly is not going to displace him, but there are a lot of times when I would like to ride quietly, and he isn’t into that. So, any advice on how to keep him from being jealous? He’s awfully possessive!

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Congratulations J-J! Tell us more about her. Are you keeping her in the same pasture as The Dodger? Unless they are kept together you should be able to work them independently and tamp down the jealousy. With Mischief and Carmagirl, both meet me at the gate, but they’ve acquired an order, her first, and then him, and I feed in this order. He’s learned that he can chase her off feed and anyone else, and rule her in the pasture, but she’d rather die than yield me to him at the gate. He is unhappy about this, but you once told me not to feel guilty about that, as he gets plenty of love, and you are right.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    They will be in separate but adjoining fields. Unless there is some serious reason, we don’t put the girls and boys together. She is really, really pretty, and how I came to find her made it seem that it was meant for me to buy her. She had been posted on a local site through Facebook, and about 10 minutes later (after I saw her and messaged the owner) the ad was pulled because she no longer lives locally. It was pure happenstance that I saw her during those few minutes. Have always loved black horses (and have two black dogs and one black cat as well), and she has such a pretty face. In addition, she has been used for eventing, is trail and traffic safe, and SANE! She is also healthy, sound and an easy keeper. She is said to be a little forward on trails, but since Joe Joe is a lot sideways on trails, forward would be a relief. Cantering sideways into trees or the horse in front of me isn’t much fun. When I get her, Sunday or Monday (weather permitting), I will take and post some pics. She also already knows some basic dressage, and I hope she will learn even more – Joe Joe thinks it is silly and somewhat boring. However, he will always be top horse – no one could match his personality. He doesn’t mind me riding other horses, but they should not get his treats, so I will probably be turning her out while he is still in the barn. I just don’t want his feelings to be hurt.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    She sounds great and I can’t wait to see photos of her. Black beauty! It certainly does take the fun out of hacking out if it’s a battle the whole way. Forward on trails is good. The alternative is undesirable in my opinion, as I don’t want to be responsible for keeping the horse’s energy up on the trail. Much prefer a partner to a dead mount, safer too. Keeping the energy down on a forward horse is about not letting them take off too fast in the beginning. If you let one of mine canter too early- they want to run everywhere – and it’s also an injury risk this time of year as they need to warm up before being so athletic. This is also why I don’t lunge before riding – too much energy build up ready to blow when I mount. Other types of horses do better with a lunge, not mine. I lunge on days I don’t ride.

    Treats are an area where I struggle as well as mine are usually pinning ears left and right to complain about the very existence of competition. Best to only treat if they “do” something so they don’t expect it just ’cause they smell it. They give me room and complete attention, waiting to be told to do something to get a treat. Pretty cute. I send through the gate, he/she turns and waits, treat. Happy horse. I send the other one through, treat, happy horse. Using their thinking side rather than their reactive emotional side keeps them from being aggressive, too. I am constantly working between two horses – it has to be systematic and predictable – and the focus must always be on me lest they forget where I am and hurt me. You will devise your own strategies.

    Does she have good movement? How’s her canter? How big is she? 13 is a good age – young enough without being too young. Lots of good years left – more than me probably.

    Over time I have developed different expectations for my horses that helps me stay happy with who they are. I don’t expect Carmagirl to stand like a statue with no rope on her until I say go, Mischief does that. He comes always at a run, even if it means hard work and he’s worked a lot already. Carmagirl will make me come to the middle of the pasture to get her if she is in a ‘mood’. I go stand with my lunge whip and she comes over. Just a dance we do. But once in the saddle, she is superior in smoothness and subtlety, is calm, steady, best trail horse I’ve ever had. Mischief tries, but he bores easily and likes to throw a little excitement in there from time to time… and he can be choppy or walk like a camel if he is trying to get attention. He won’t let me relax and daydream for too long, but I reach a perfect peace on Carmagirl, harmony undisturbed for as long as I want. OTOH, he’s got tremendous agility and power and he’s fancy. So on days when I want to play – he’s a very willing partner. But if I need a break from stress – Carmagirl knows – and she tunes her volume to just where I am.

    Apples and oranges. It would be tougher if they were too similar, then I’d have to judge them on the same merits. I hope it works as well for you – The Dodger will tantalize your playful nature, and black beauty (what is her name!?) will nurture the pensive part.

    I look forward to hearing how you progress with her.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    It was too wet to canter, but she has 3 good trots (slow, working and extended) and a nice walk. She is roughly the same size as Joe Joe – 14.3 to 15. There are subtle differences (well, gender is obvious) because she is Egyptian and he is Polish.

    I mostly use treats as a training reward or after we have finished doing something. With the field, he gets a treat after he has come to the gate, put his halter on, come out, and stand while I close it. Going back, he gets a treat after he goes in, turns, takes his halter off and allows me to leave and close the gate. I once knew a broodmare who needed to have the lead wrapped around the post so she did not drag whoever was turning her out to Arizona, and I prefer good manners at gates. It shouldn’t really be a problem since they will be in separate fields. Joe Joe has been with two other horses with whom he would share, but the two in there now are NOT his friends! They have learned to just keep their distance. This does have a good side, as I don’t need to worry about one of them trying to get out the gate with us.

    Our trails are too narrow and twisty for anything other than a walk, which is why I dislike the sideways trot/canter thing. My knees aren’t great already, and I don’t want them worse.

    I don’t often longe, because he either just goes around as if it is no big deal or keeps turning and facing me so I can’t get behind his shoulder. Depends on how stupid he thinks it is. Last time I took him out in long lines, he decided he could only go in reverse. I got so mad that I led him to the farthest end of the ring, turned him toward the gate and told him that if he wanted to get out he was going to have to go frontwards. Spoiled little brat. And I do know it’s my fault.

    Her name is LR Selena, and she is on pedigreeonline.com if you want to look at her pedigree. I tried, but it was Arabic to me. Her dam was from Sapphire Arabians.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    How are you and Selena getting on?

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Very, very slowly! The day we picked her up was a gift – sunny and in the 50s. Then, the weather took a serious turn for the worse – threatened blizzard, which was really a little snow and ice, and today sunny but COLD. Everything is frozen, and it is so windy. I just think she is better left alone except for feeding and such. Tomorrow is supposed to be sunny and in the mid-40s, so I hope to be able to lead her around the farm and perhaps even get on her and walk her around some bareback.

    Am hoping to get some pictures of her as well. Joe Joe was thoroughly insulted that I gave food to someone else.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: typo

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Now you know how I feel everyday with the “I can’t believe you just gave MY carrot to her/him!” looks I get from both horses as I alternate who gets a carrot and who gets a pat.

    I also empathize about the weather – my new saddle is here but the weather needs to clear up a bit for me to experiment with it. At least in the case of Selena (have you given her a nickname yet?) it works better for her to have some time to adjust to a new situation. Slow and steady always works best with horses.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Haven’t given her a nickname – she is accustomed to her “real” name, and I don’t want to add to the strangeness of her new situation. She is getting along well with the other two girls in her field – thank heaven. None of them are particularly dominant, which helps.

    Remember, in July, when I am whining about the heat, how I moaned about the cold!

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    A picture of Selena! Of course, it was too cold to undress her, but she even looks good in a blanket. She was just checking to see if I might have some more food.

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    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    J-J – You’ve got Black Beauty! What a beautiful face, and she looks like she has a nice curly mane there. When she can get the blanket off – post another picture. I’ve just changed the supplement I’ve been giving Carmagirl to the Omega 3 supplement that contains a mane/coat darkening benefit. Her mane is so faded from the sun. It’s worse in winter because she stands all day in the sun. In summer she stands in the shade. The supplement is for blacks and bays – so I’ll let you know if it makes a difference.

    Selena looks very happy standing there with you.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Thanks, Mapale. If you google “LR Selena”, there are other pictures of her somewhere, and if you do Facebook she is in albums. She was bred by Lisa Raymond, who also may have pics posted elsewhere than Facebook. Breeding is El Maestro out of LR Elana. I think it’s El.

    This picture is from the day I first saw her in person – it was so foggy and had been raining entire arks, not just cats and dogs.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: needed more words
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    It is never the horse's fault

    robert_powers
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I love Arabs. Riding down the trail sideways, the thought makes me laugh. I don’t know if it will work, but I’ve known mortal enemies to become best friends after long trailer rides together. Also it may be more than you bargain for and more trouble than it is worth but long trail rides with both where you pony one and swap often is a way to establish your status between the two of them. Only for the hardy with two high spirited horses. It may be the way to start world war 3. Good luck. A horse with a strong spirit and quick mind is definitely worth the work.

    Joe-Joe Original Poster Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    #1 Horse is afraid of dirt, trees, birds, air, leaves, pterydactyls, tractors that are not moving, the field in which he lives, the horses with whom he lives and the barn in which he lives. Also, people who are not offering him food and the road he walks down every single day (he caprioles up it, due to the dinosaurs and dragons lurking in the shrubbery). Our trails are so narrow and twisty one can only go frontwards at a walk. Also, I am so old and feeble I cannot get on without a block. But, he is the absolute best horse on the planet! Hence, horse #2. I love hot horses, and Arabians are a tad shorter that Thoroughbreds, so I won’t have as far to fall.

    On the plus side, #1 horse is smart, likes to learn new things and is very musical. He does almost everything on voice command alone, and I can ride him back to his field with just a halter and lead. Listen to the song “My Way” from The Roar of the Greasepaint, The Smell of the Crowd (NOT the Sinatra one), and you will understand the conversations I have with him.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Congrats, Joe-Joe! I know exactly what you mean about a horse WANTING to go forward after trying to work with my rogue of a rescue horse who wanted to do anything EXCEPT go forward. What a relief to have Boo! I had to laugh at the treat discussion, too. Prim was still alive when I had the rescue horse, and I don’t think I ever want to cope with two horses again, especially when one was eight years old when he was gelded. With Boo, I only give her a peppermint when she comes if I whistle or call her. Useful this time of year when green grass is everywhere. We have 20 acres but not all of it is fenced, so I put a breakaway halter on her and a catch rope, and let her roam around and graze while I clean her corral or do other chores. So far I’ve needed backup (alfalfa/oat cubes rattling around in a feed bucket) as she hasn’t completely made the association yet between coming when I whistle and a peppermint. I love black too, which is why we also have a black dog and a black cat. One of my all-time favorite horses was a solid black Appendix Horse. What treats does Selena prefer? Give her one for me, please!

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