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New Horse Over Weight

This topic contains 10 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by riding for Christ riding for Christ 1 year, 1 month ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • breezytony13 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 4

    I am getting a new horse. When I went to try her out the man said that she had been sitting scine summer and when I tryed her out I figured she would be crazy but she was clam and did not buck or do any of that stuff. When I was riding her I was only trotting her it was only for 5 mintures and she was out of breath. We went on a trail ride and she got even more out of breath and we only went a few yards. She is a great horse and I really like her so I think I am getting. What are somethings I can do to get her back in shape and back on the barrel pattern?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    First, have her checked out by your vet, prior to purchase. If she is sound, with no health issues to cause the breathing issue, then you will have to gradually and slowly bring her back into a fit condition. Probably forget about barrels for at least this year. Is she actually overweight? Not mentioned in your post. If so, is it because she is too fat from poor diet and no work, or has poor muscle tone from no work but not actually a bad weight? Get her on a good diet plan, so that she tones up without packing on pounds. Were she mine, I would probably do a lot of work in long lines and not ride her much in the beginning. Assuming that she is in generally good health, this should work. It sounds to me, though, as if she has something going on other than just not working since summer.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    I agree with Joe-Joe, a vet check is a MUST before purchase. Why has the horse not been ridden? She might be the sweetest horse in the world, but if she has foundered or had an injury, you would want to know as it will increase the risk of future injury and illness. Don’t buy trouble, it very often comes for free.

    Hard breathing can be many issues from lack of conditioning to allergies to asthma. If she has chronic respiratory illness, you may be looking at very expensive medicine just to keep her in working condition and she may never be able to run barrels.

    The money for a vet check is well worth it. Good luck.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    A rider to my post and Mapale’s – if the vet says she isn’t a good fit for you, pay attention! Years ago a friend was considering a lovely Welsh/Arab cross for her daughter. I rode him at his farm, and for the vet check. During the vet check, he freaked out and just ran around in circles for what felt like forever. When he finally stopped, the vet said to send him back. She bought him anyway, and subsequently he broke her daughter’s back. He was pretty, but not quite sane.

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Agreeing with the rest: check out health issues, specifically respiratoury before buying. Be sure to describe to the vet your intended discipline for this horse to see that she is suitable to the task(s). Good luck, I hope it all works out but listen to the vet.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    breezytony13 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 4

    The horse is sound she had her teeth floted and a vet come and look at her the same day and I called the vet and she said she was sound. And the reason for her not being ridden is because the guy we are getting her from only trail rides and he has not gone trail riding scine the end of last summer becaue we had a bad winter and we are in north carolina so everyone panicks when it snows. She does not have poor muscle she is perfectly fine with muscle. She has just been sitting in a pasture all winter and has not been rode.

    breezytony13 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 3Replies Posted: 4

    We know the guy that we are getting her from he is a friends dad and he is not rushing to get rid of her. Our friend has rode her and both of my cusions.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Not having been ridden is no reason (in my experience) for being out of breath in so short a time as you have described. My gelding has also not been ridden since last summer, and he can still go on (and on and on like a fruit bat) for hours. He is a bit out of condition, but never out of breath.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    It sounds like you are familiar with her – and with the vet check you can have confidence in her health. I would pose questions to the vet who came – ask if he/she listened for respiratory sounds? And express your concerns – that’s what you paid that vet for – let him/her earn her money!

    As to conditioning for barrels – this is sprinting with a twist – the horse has to have quick starts and turns – so I’d work on lateral strengths like turning on the fore, turning on the hind, and sidepassing at the trot. Work both sides equally. Do this at short intervals daily or every other day if you can, giving her time off at least two days/week until she can handle the work. As she builds strength – I’m another Tarheel – so I know we’ve got hills unless you live down east. Do lots of hill work as that builds the back end and will give you the strength you need for quick turns.

    Short regular intervals of working out, not long infrequent ones. Work harder one day and less so the next. You’ll get her there – oh and nerves can make a horse breathe harder quicker too. Maybe once she gets to know and trust you, it will be easier to breathe when working hard.

    A friend of mine has a TWH that has asthma, and the meds she buys just to keep her horse able to do trail rides are very expensive. I know what a pain that is, and was just trying to look out for you. We are all on your side, and we hope there is a very healthy horse in your future.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by Mapale Mapale. Reason: spelling

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    ellenolsson
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 7

    I agree with Joe-Joe and I think he has given you the perfect solution.

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    To get her back in shape, Lunge her both directions 2 or 3 times. make sure that her head is on the inside of the circle.
    Move her hind quarters away from you with her head tilted to you. The back leg closest to you has to cross up and away from you. This will build muscle to lose fat.
    Flex her neck around on both sides and pull\massage until she is not pulling on you.
    Flex and move the hind quarters away from you at the same time. Her head does not need to be pulling on you as you are doing this.
    Back her up in a straight line then yield her shoulders away from you. The front leg closest to you is to cross over the other front leg. Do this at least 3 times.
    Do all of them on both sides.
    These are exercises that will make her lose weight and she will be able to perform better.

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