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New Horse!

This topic contains 14 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Joan Fry 2 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • Joan Fry Original Poster
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    I finally bought a sweet girl who has a lot going for her–mainly her attitude. She’s a 12-year-old bay Morgan, has shown a little, but spent most of this year on pasture because she was raising a foal. Other than badly needing a trim, I only have one question about her. Her foal apparently nibbled her tail off–most of it, anyway. The owner braided some ribbons into it so she could use her tail to whisk away flies. I have to say she looks a little funny with those long yellow ribbons in her tail. Is there any way to speed up the process of growing a tail? The owner assured me that it IS growing, just not very quickly. Unfortunately I’m not known for my patience!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I used MTG, and was happy with the results, but not the smell. There is a newer version that is supposed to smell better.

    CONGRATULATIONS!!!!! Happy trails to both of you! Post her picture (I managed, so anyone can do it.)

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Happy Day, Joan Fry!! Perfect timing, too, not TOO cold yet : )

    I only know of MTG used in any tail growth hopes and often enough tho I have little to no hands on experience with it.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Wonderful news, Joan!!! You got your bay horse – and a Morgan – she sounds perfect! Tell us more about her – what is her name – is she a good mover – what is her personality?

    Mischief had been stall/small paddock kept when I bought him and had rubbed off much of his mane. Given a few years, he’s looking lots better. The biotin in the hoof supplement helps with hair growth – so you could try adding biotin – and it would help with feet too. In time she’ll get her tail back!

    Did you decide to board her or bring her home? How tall is she? Any chrome? I do wish you’d post a photo so we can all admire her.

    I am so happy for you. Congratulations! Many, many happy trails, Joan.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joan Fry Original Poster
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Thank you all! Joe-Joe, today’s blog answers a question about growing in a horse’s forelock. The blogger intimated that MTG was the best. I can think of worse things than bacon for my hands to smell like, but between the time I order the product and its arrival, I should have found some dedicated rubber gloves.

    Pheets, thanks to your instructions, I should be able to post a photo of her. First I have to take some. 😉 And yes, the weather is PERFECT! I rarely miss living on the east coast, but I do miss autumn.

    Back to tails for a second. I find I know nothing about them! Is hair supposed to grow all the way up and town the tailbone? Including the end? Or does the growth stop partway down? I’ve had no reason to examine a horse’s tailbone before this, but the nub of her tail is naked–it isn’t growing anything! And, she gets antsy when I try to examine it closely.

    Yes, Mapale, I finally got my bay horse! Looking straight at her, she resembles Joe-Joe the Horse–similar ears, similar expression, but her star’s a little bigger and her stripe’s a little wider. About 15 hands, may be shorter after her feet are trimmed. Very definitely one of the “new” Morgans as far as throatlatch and head and neck carriage is concerned. No chrome–solid black almost to her knees. The rest of her is a shiny mahogany bay. She’s 12, but her training didn’t start until she was 9. Quite a few saddle seat people who traditionally show their horses in a double bridle use a twisted wire snaffle when they go trail riding. Boo (her barn name) took this year off to have a foal–in fact the day I rode her might have been the first time she’d been ridden in nearly a year. The trainer rode her first, using a bit I’ve never seen before (she said hunter-jumper people use them) that required two reins. When I said I had never ridden with two reins (not entirely accurate, but close enough), the trainer bridled her with a thick slow twist in her mouth. About halfway through my test ride it was obvious the mare did not like the bit at all and got chargy. So I am trying out various snaffles on her while I free-longe her. I also started her on a hoof supplement that contains biotin. One thing about her training I did appreciate. I gave her dressage-horse cues to ask for the canter–and she bucked. I asked the trainer what I’d done. She said, “You probably used too much leg. Raise your rail-side hand and say the name of the gait.” I’m thinking, Right. And then the Tooth Fairy will fly in to help. To my astonishment, it worked. Both ways of the ring!

    She’s very sweet, very willing–she whinnies as soon as she sees me, and when I go inside, she comes right up to me. Her registered name is something like Bigoty, Bigoty, Bigoty. Apparently the owner liked Nascar racing and this is something the crowd yells out. Completely lost on me. But since she has had a foal, it will probably be very expensive to change her name, if that’s even possible. So her “unofficial” name is Peek-a-Boo, barn name Boo.

    She has very smooth gaits, a good mind, and is eager to please. I brought her home, Mapale. Believe it or not I missed cleaning the pipe corral! By next summer the novelty will have worn off. I seriously can’t function outside when it’s 105 degrees. I don’t think I could ride–I know I don’t want to. I did go look at some boarding facilities, and there are several where daily turnouts are part of the package.

    I adore her! Thanks for letting me brag!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Pelham or Kimberwicke? I prefer the Pelham, if one needs that strong a bit, because it is less severe than the Kimberwicke (in the right hands). It allows one to use the curb or not, depending on the situation. I used one to hunt, but normally rode with a rubber Dee – my first horse only thought he was in a race; but Nightshade and Joe Joe had actual memories and I never hunted her. Joe Joe, obviously, would pass the fox if there were one. It is odd – we hunted a lot where I used to live, but had no foxes. Here, we have lots of foxes, but nothing to jump while galloping around the countryside, so no one does. Twisted wire snaffles are seriously severe – try riding her in an enclosure with just a halter. If she knows the words, you might not need much bit at all – just something to hold the bridle on her head and to attach to the reins. As if you don’t alreadly know all this!

    This is just so exciting – hope you both have a wonderful time together for years and years and years.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Oh my – you did fall in love! How could you help it? Boo – that was a nickname for one of my dogs (from Boo Radley – the unlikely dark ‘hero’ from To Kill a Mockingbird). I love it!

    Absolutely enjoyed your bragging! Mahogany bay (like Carmagirl) my favorite of all. And since she looks like Joe-Joe The Horse, she must have a very nice face.

    Re the double reining – I was unfamiliar with it too when I bought Mischief – but I learned to like it when I figured out how to work the reins independently in my fingers. I gradually weaned him from the bit entirely by working the barbada sidepull instead of the bit. Not sure if Boo’s bridle works like a jaquima though. In your experienced hands I’m sure you don’t have to worry as much about using a harsh bit until you can work her into something lighter. Working off voice commands – how awesome is that!

    I’m glad you brought her home so you can spend lots of time with her – anytime you can get free. That’s my favorite part of having horses – being able to go down to the barn on a whim. Give her a warm carrot from me!

    Cold weather moving in – the time to worry about frozen troughs is here. Sigh. I have two really woolly horses, so it’s going to be a bad winter.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Small world of like thinkers, we are indeed! The First (MY first Arabian) was named Bhu, which was the abbreviated version of ‘Mr. Breeze’ : )

    New horses ( I have a new one coming in as well but his story is unrelated to the topic and not for this thread), this is so cool : D Adventures await!! And Christmas this year will be a LOT easier : )

    Cookies from me, too, Joan Fry!!

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joan Fry Original Poster
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    I too had Boo Radley in mind when I chose her name, Mapale–especially since her predecessor was named Scout! Pheets, how funny we somehow all keep connecting and re-connecting. I suspect I know where you posted your new horse thread and will read it next!

    Joe-Joe, her bit didn’t come with her. It was an odd shape, with various slots along the side where you could attach reins. The trainer was using it like a double bridle–one direct rein (although it wasn’t a jointed snaffle, more like a mullin but with rollers all along the mouthpiece) and one curb rein. I have almost no experience with double reins, which is how she ended up with a slow twist in her mouth. Since I don’t like them either, I’m playing with jointed snaffles. I like eggbutts with a copper mouthpiece and most of my horses do too, so that’s what she has now. I may change that to a fat rubber snaffle since she’s obviously very sensitive to bit pressure.

    To judge from what I’ve learned about her from free longeing her, she knows the words “trot” and “canter,” but has never even heard “walk.” I think she knows “whoa,” but if the wind is blowing, she thinks she doesn’t. If the dog’s barking at the dog up the hill, she is sure she doesn’t. It’s an exercise in patience and imagination to get her to slow down in any gait. I don’t think she’s ready for me to hop on her bareback with just a halter. I KNOW I’m not! Once she stops reversing without my asking her to, I’ll start longeing her on the longe line, and then ground driving her.

    So no more suggestions about tails? I’ll check all my old books on the subject. Thank you all so much for your good wishes! I truly appreciate them–and you.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Sounds like a Kimberwicke, which I find to be rather severe. I changed Joe Joe to a French link snaffle, which is working well, but he has always (since I’ve known him) had a snaffle of some sort. We started with a full cheek, because he did not know how to turn, never mind bend, then tried various rubber bits all of which he tried to spit out. Didn’t even like the soft rubber Mullen.

    I would really try the MTG – but if she has some issue that causes her to rub her tail, you would first have to fix that.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joan Fry Original Poster
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Boo tried to spit out the eggbutt too, the first couple of times. Now she accepts it. Since she knows how to turn I don’t need a full-cheek snaffle, but I also have a French link that I actually bought for Scout, but I never had a chance to try it on him. So I have other options, and plenty of time. I had to laugh about your fox hunting stories. This is cowboy country, so no hunt clubs. But when I lived in Del Mar (another husband, another lifetime) there was a hunt club there, and they chased coyotes.

    I will order the MTG. I should have clarified that I meant suggestions about why the entire tail isn’t sprouting hair, especially on the end. No, she doesn’t rub her tail.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Hard to tell about the tail without actually seeing it.

    It is never the horse's fault

    NinaJD NinaJD
    Topics Started: 8Replies Posted: 139

    we didn’t have any luck with the mtg. To me it smells like liquid smoke. But we also used gloves.
    I find for our boys the omega horse shine helps with their mane and tails(at least my moms arab and my mutt) my paint on the other hand takes forever to grow an inch.

    "Take the time it takes, so that it takes less time."
    "Expect a lot, accept a little, reward often."
    Pat Parelli

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Nina – you have nailed the smell! I had used it one day, and while grooming I was convinced that I smelled something burning but never found anything. Eventually I realized that it was strongest when I was doing his hindquarters and had to be the MTG. But, it did at least make his tail grow, even though he hates slimy, smelly, goopy or spray things.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joan Fry Original Poster
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Thanks, Nina. I bought the new, “Plus” version of MTG, but I haven’t started her on it yet so I can’t comment on the smell. I also bought gloves–just in case! We’re going to the Caribbean to celebrate an anniversary and two birthdays, so I won’t be back until nearly Christmas. A 4-H girl up the road will be horse-sitting for me, but I’d rather start it on her when I’m around full-time.

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