OTTB

This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by jeweled&tooledcustomleather jeweled&tooledcustomleather 2 years, 2 months ago.

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  • ljohns Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    This OTTB jogged sound but came up sore after running hard at the track. Legs looked clean but had a small bump on the right hock which radiographed clean and the bump was drained and the joint fluid appeared healthy. A few weeks or so later he had free jumped and then a soft bump on the side of the left hock appeared. It radiographed clean. It was stated that this was cosmetic only and horses sometimes tear the membrane around the joint causing the fluid to leak into the capsule. Horses are not bothered by these soft bumps but they may or may not go away. Any thoughts? Thank you

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    How old is this horse? How long off the track?

    It is never the horse's fault

    ljohns Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    He is a 5 yr old and been off the track about 2-3 months. Thanks

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Perhaps equally important: what are your plans for this horse?

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    5 is still a baby, and a few months is not much time at all. Take everything with him slowly, and he could turn into a wonderful horse. He really knows very little about being a “normal” horse, and he will be learning for a long time.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    My mare has a stretched tendon sheath that allows for the collection of fluid slightly more than a windpuff. It’s cosmetic and visible, but doesn’t affect soundness, however when fluid collects I wrap, cold hose, and restrict her until the swelling goes down. Additionally because she has the history of injury I give her SmartFlex Rehab supplement to help keep her sound and I highly recommend it. If there is fluid I think you should show caution re work until the fluid dissipates and check for lameness at a trot on pavement or on a pivot. If you ever do detect lameness it might be time to call a vet.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    ljohns Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Thanks for the input.

    wyoenglishrider wyoenglishrider
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 101

    Yes-what Joe Joe said: OTTB’s should have months to rest & just learn about being a horse prior to re-training. Really. I know that is probably not want you want to hear, especially with summer-but, if he were mine, I would not jump him until this fall or even next spring. But, some would consider me overly conservative. When I bought my OTTB mare, she had been off the track for a year & had a swollen tendon sheath (L hind) at her pre-purchase. She jogged & felt sound, but the vet recommended not buying-I did anyways. I used Smart TLC, took things very slowly with her, & have not had a problem with that leg. (have had her 8 years now.) I didn’t even canter her for the 1st 4-5 months, didn’t jump her for over a year. But that is just me. Have fun getting to know him-they are so smart & willing to work for you!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Wyo – I agree with you (naturally). 5 is also fairly young for jumping, as horses mature slowly (the larger the breed, the longer it takes also). I tend to agree with the Spanish Riding School on training. If memory serves, they don’t start training until they are about 6, and are able to perform through their 20’s. I’ve seen a lot of physical issues that could have been prevented, had the horses been allowed to mature for a longer period of time.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: forgot an important word

    It is never the horse's fault

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    If this is your first OTTB, one of things you might not know is that many OTTBs are only taught to go forward, and not really taught to turn in answer to pressure on one rein or the other, much less to bend through the neck. Back when I was younger and saddle breaking horses, I used to long line them with a bridle, and the long lines attached to the bridle, so I could teach them to turn in answer to increased tension on one rein or the other. OTTBs are also often intentionally not taught to slow down or stop in response to increaed tension on both reins. But it is easy enough to also teach the “slow down” or “stop” rein command while long lining, and it is possible to teach the horse to be response to a slow down or stop command merely by increasing the tension in your fingers, hands, & arms, instead of pulling back. If you teach these two basics before you get on, you have a horse with at least a rudimentary concept of turning, slow down, and stop when you do start riding. Teaching it this way can also be make it easier for the horse, so that when he is ridden in a hunt seat or dressage saddle, or even a western saddle, that will put the rider’s weight in a much different balance than what the horse is used to, he only has to deal with the new rider balance issue, not the rider balance issue plus new (& to the horse) strange rein commands. Easier for the horse and safer for the rider. This method also works well for youngsters.

    ljohns Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Thanks to all for the information-this is not my horse yet so I was not the person who free jumped him. I would have also been more patient. I was seeking advice after paying quite a bit for a PPE. The vets relayed the info of the swelling and the joints and x-rays and indicated it may be or may not be trouble in the future. So there basically is a recurring symptom but no diagnosis, and therefore, no prognosis. I have had several OTTB’s in my past which I trained and showed-I actually had a TB farm but had not seen this before? As we all know, we keep learning through each other and I am so grateful for this forum offered via SmartPak. I will continue to check back so any experience or advice is always welcome-Thanks again! Thank you SmartPak!

    jeweled&tooledcustomleather jeweled&tooledcustomleather
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Hi Ljohn it sounds like your horse has stressed tendons and would benefit from a pack of support boots all 4 professional choice is the best company for support boots the design and thickness of the boot helps protect and support tendons that are weak. Any time you work your horse you should use them his weak tendons are probably the reason he was taken off the track. Hell be an awesome horse and you can start training him right away just with all 4 protective boots even if you are just turning him out to play. Reason being is because if he overstresses his tendons he can acctually bow a tendon and if that happens the casing that holds the tendon in will rip and let it out and are lame for months and need to be wrapped with a cotton wrap every day. It happens a lot to horses off the track. My grandma grew up on track.. Her father was a trainer so she saw a lot of these problems. But if you keep support boots on him when you get him out he should be fine just check with your vet if you think hes bowed a tendon. Good luck.

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