Picky Drinker

This topic contains 32 replies, has 27 voices, and was last updated by  pward61 1 year, 4 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)
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  • riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    I have traveled with horses to shows and stuff. I put Coke or Dr. Pepper in the water and they drank it. Before I tried putting Coke in the water they wouldn’t drink the water.

    edee_smith
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    I don’t allow my horse to drink from a water trough other horses use, you never know the health of all the horses that have used trough.
    I carry his own red buckets, don’t know if he can see color or not. I put his water and hay where he can eat and leave him alone to relax.
    I get those big blue water containers from Walmart and fill with water take 1 or 2 depending on how much needed, if I am not sure of water where I am going.
    In a pinch usually some type of store/gas station where water can be bought is around, unless out in wilderness.
    But my horse is not real picky, drinks beer from a red solo cup. lol

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I think the original poster was more concerned that her horse won’t drink strange water, not that she was using a water trough. I cannot imagine anyone doing that at a strange place.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Sheryl G.
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    We have a gelding with this problem, He will not drink out of stream, a dirty bucket, pond or another horses bucket. He is also picky about the temperature of the water and refuses to drink if it’s too cold or to warm. After much aggravation we realized that he is a hardy eater, and likes his grain and beet pulp, I figured out that if I take his feed bucket with me when we travel I can toss part of his grain and beet pulp ration in the bottom of the bucket and fill it with water and he swills it right down to get to his grain. also a little molasses sometimes works but not always it depends on the day. Be sure you start doing this at home before you travel, that way he is used to it. We also add a little smartlytes to the water to encourage healthy water intake. Have you tried carrying a few gallons of water from home?

    nelsonrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    If you were changing your disipline to competative trail we would have a long discussion about electrolytes, but to get a horse to drink on trail that has worked in the past is to take about 1/2 teaspoon of table salt and put it above the upper front teeth and lip. Works most of the time.

    DS
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    We often offer our horses water with molasses stirred into it. Sometimes you can find bags of dry molasses, which will keep a long time, and are less messy. (You can also by the liquid molasses at the grocery store.) Whenever we need to hydrate a horse, that’s what we turn to. If you try this at home, and get your horse accustomed to the taste, your picky drinker may turn into a guzzler….even away from home! Hope this helps.

    maria_schaal
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    I teach my horses at home to drink from our travel buckets by offering them water from them any chance I get (in the stall, after a ride, in the field, etc.) and after they take a drink they get a treat. Pretty soon they get excited to see the bucket and gulp down half of it because they think it is something “special.” Since they associate the bucket with something good, you can put any water in there and they will drink it. If you don’t have the time to practice, soaking the hay is a good option as well.

    melinda_mills
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    You can increase her water intake before you go on rides by adding well-hydrated beet pulp. It is an excellent source of fiber & increases the amount of water in the gut because of its water-holding capability. It comes as shreds with or without molasses & is added to her regular ration. I feed it year round because of limited pasture & add additional water in the cold months when they are less likely to drink.

    twiz
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    Horse Quencher, comes in different flavors. It looks like granola. My one horse will almost kill me to get to the peppermint.
    I have a horses that I have to watch when it gets super hot, she doesn’t always drink enough. If I make this up I can watch her chug it down and know that she is hydrated.

    DressageRider5 Original Poster DressageRider5
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 14

    Thank you all for the informative and creative ideas in helping my mare drink! I am determined to see which one she prefers. Unfortunately I cannot give her beet pulp because it makes her stools loose. But thank you all for your input! ๐Ÿ˜€

    HorsePour
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    My trail mare drives me crazy with fear too — she used to not drink away from home. At all (not even in streams). But like some others suggested above, I have always traveled with buckets of our own water — in food grade buckets is important (so they don’t taste like plastic by the time I open them!) — and I switched the water bucket I use in her stall to a small, over the rail portable one, and take that with me, so that she is familiar with it and its smell. That has been the only thing, it works better than anything else I have tried (including the soda and horse quencher suggestions, which my mare just turned her nose up to). It’s a RELIEF to finally know she’ll drink!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    They can see red! Selena’s breakfast dish is red, as is her grooming box. She always thinks the box is more food.

    It is never the horse's fault

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Studies have been done at Universities that offer training for animal vets who wish to specialize in horses. Originally, it was generally accepted that horses could only see in black and white, but that consensus was based on the fact that a horse’s eye structure is not identical to human eye structure. The studies proved that horses can see colors, though not necessarily the same way humans see color, and not necessarily in the range of colors we humans can see. If one stops to think about it, horses are prey animals in the animal world, so only seeing black & white could be a death sentence, if they can’t distinguish between the color of grass and trees and the color of a predator hiding in that grass or trees.

    emmatester
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    You could try putting hay in the water ๐Ÿ™‚ I know my horse always enjoys finding a bite of hay when she goes to take a drink. Hope this helps!

    donna_jacobson
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I do two things before I travel. about 2-3 days before I start my horses on electrolytes and put vanilla in their water. That way when I get to a show the water taste like it does at home and do not start out dehydrated.

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