Our Horses, Their Stories and Other Musings

This topic contains 634 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe 2 years, 4 months ago.

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  • pheets Original Poster pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    I have recently changed my profile pic tho have been a semi active member since the inception of this forum with the same (my pheety : ) pic until now. For the sake of honesty, that is no longer Pheets in the pic, it is my precious little boarder mare <3 The symmetry in the mare’s off-ground feet is nothing short of miraculous, for HER. Story pending permission and interest.

    While I am NOT seeking full disclosure from any of you, I AM interested in what’s behind your profile pics, assuming that most are of your own horses/family. Tell the story if you like, I would love to hear : ) I love photography and I love to write/read so this could be best of both : ) And some of you write SOOO well!

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Pheets, great photo! I wish I could see more of it, though. Probably because I’m seeing the mare at an angle and am not sure which hind leg is doing what, she doesn’t seem to be tracking straight. I’m sure that’s not the case–or else is part of the “miracle” you allude to. I’d love to hear her story, if her owner consents. So you basically run a care facility–layup for event horses. Is that right?

    You’ll see either Scout or a photo of Prim, my old ASB mare (most of the photos in Backyard Horsekeeping are of her), as soon as I figure out how to post a profile pic. My husband’s good at that. I am hopeless!

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Pheets – I love the symmetry of the footfall – elevation and motion – and the photo takes my breath away. I can ‘hear’ it! Tell us her story!

    My pic is Carmagirl(L) and Mischief(R) in early spring when she had a grazing muzzle on.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    pheets Original Poster pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    I am not sure exactly what to classify myself as, Joan Fry. I just seem to be a magnet for a particular need : ) I do a lot of daily rehab in that every horse here has some type of issue. Only have two boarders and they have been loyal for years so have progressed along with the conditions and circumstances that come with long term management ( R and L, you guys are the BEST!)

    2008 Paint/QH mare, history of graphic and dramatic wounds lay-up worthy, one per year since she was a yearling. Most recent was a R shoulder wound due to a door latch. The kind of latch you can find on every door, every barn, in every town, on every planet. I have pics but they are graphic, I can email if REALLY interested.

    Wounds herself in Novembre 2013. Two week stall rest, 40 +/- stitches, drain (lasted 4 days), antibiotics, scrub and goo three times a day. The initial wound was an open, ragged edged, 8 inch arc, 3 inch widest, over the flesh (thank GOD) of her R shoulder. Two weeks lay-up ,vet comes back out to remove sutures, tests for an hour, removing first every other then a few more checked and checked again that she would hold. We ALL thought she’d be fine. She looked so solid and healing so well! Of course not. Butterflied herself, wide open. Back to saline and Derma-Gel two to three time a day.

    The pic was taken the following March 2014, at her first clinic, first time in long lines. The pic is of her trotting on a L bend over ground rails so no, she is not straight. She wasn’t really asked to go thru the rails but she has her own agenda at times. Not a good photographer, just lucky, but thank you, guys! : )

    The attached pic is how nicely it healed, again, thank GOD : ) The white line is all that remains and today it is half of that.

    As she progresses in training, I am finding that she might be a tad weak in that shoulder tho not surprising and am hoping that with continued and thoughtful therapy and exercise, she will strengthen and stay sound. She is young, I am learning, there is time, her owner is patient.

    So….. Carmagirl on left and The Mis on the right. That’s all? I know so little of Pasos… do share a bit more?

    Attachments:

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    That’s an amazing success story! I said on another discussion thread that the best thing horses give us is courage, but I also think they teach us about hope in action, perseverance, which produces results. Whether it is in the day in and day out of training, or in bringing them back from injury, it takes staying power. In the photo that’s the injured shoulder getting great lift! And with that I’d expect the opposite hind to lag – but it looks great!

    Thanks Pheets, for sharing her story. Keep us posted on her progress.

    (BTW -thanks again for your help with Carmagirl – she’s progressing nicely now. You have a gift!)

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Pasos – oh boy – they are a different type of horse all the way around.

    Out horse shopping, I went to look at a Missouri Fox Trotter. That one was too lazy for me. So his owner said he had a mare that I might like, and the rest, they say, is history.

    That day after a test ride on the smoothest horse I’d ever ridden, Carmagirl put her head against my chest gently and closed her eyes – and if you knew that horse – you’d be as amazed as I was. She was seven when I got her and had had four separate registered owners. To almost everybody, she was/is tough as nails. My daughter says that Carmagirl does not concern herself with what other people want from her, but that she would do anything at all for me. This is mostly true, but she also likes little kids, and I’ve put many of them on her without a rope or a halter or a saddle. I just walk with my hand on her long dark mane, and she knows the little ones need quiet soft movement. Of all the horses I’ve owned, she is the only one I would trust this way.

    While riding in Dupont State Park years ago, we crossed a covered bridge. The wooden planking made a soundboard that put Carmagirl into a tight corto. People came from all around the bridge to see what made that remarkable even tempo patter-patter-patter, including a young Down’s child. She begged me to ride, so I got down and lifted her into my saddle. Carma knew that child was different, she walked smoothly slowly and carefully. The minute I was back in the saddle, BAM, Carmagirl performed the crisp loud corto back across the bridge. My riding buddy that day just looked on in amazement at the transformation. “Split personality” I joked.

    I am privileged to enjoy her willing nature. But a few years ago, I let her down. To my unrelenting horror I re-wrapped her injured tendon without realizing that during the day she had fractured her cannon bone in two places. She stood for that wrapping in enormous pain for one reason, because I asked her to. I didn’t know she had been further injured because it was dark, late, and I’d been in the hospital all day taking care of a friend. When she couldn’t move afterwards, I called the vet, and I still cringe, he x-rayed and found the break. In the daylight the next day, I found a downed fence rail laying in the snow. So as you see, I’m no stranger to multiple injury. Had she not be wrapped when she bucked into that fence, she would have had to be put down. The wrapping protected her. Of course it was also horrible for her to be re-wrapped after I’d unbound it. She should have kicked my head off, pinned her ears or something.

    We’ve gotten through the poulticing, the frigid cold-hosings, months of wrapping, medications, careful conditioning and reconditioning and re-injury to do it all again. As a result she trusts everything I do, no matter if I deserve it or not, and that makes her the ultimate equine partner. She is my dream girl.

    She is ‘pinky’ trained. That is to say a twitch of a pinky is all the cue she needs, if she needs one at all, I have long since suspected her of clairvoyance. If she has a flaw it is impatience, but that is sometimes the case with intelligent beings. I suspect we will always have to work on that one – hers and mine.

    With all the struggles to keep her sound (and sane when in confinement) I finally settled on getting a gelding who would be both fun to ride and who would give her some great company. Mischief was a show horse often used for lessons, highly-trained, and a dichotomy of nature. He is the sweetest most even-keeled creature I’ve ever known. But he has nitroglycerin in his blood and the curiosity of a scientist. He can get into unimaginable trouble, and has a dry sense of humor (i.e., if you say “Good boy!” he’ll shake his head ‘no’). He is both passionate and proud and yet profoundly obedient. He’s my buddy, a cheerful, energetic partner with a tremendous work ethic. Anyone introduced to him would think him mild-mannered and calm, but as my neighbor crossing our land (with permission) discovered, Mischief can encourage someone to run… fast. I call him mischief, but he’s more aptly described as a riptide, he has a placid current on top, but the spirited current below goes very fast in the opposite direction. Or perhaps it is more like seeing a tornado from space. How this feels in the saddle is a bit like sitting on a coiled spring. His PFHA name means ‘dancer’ and when I watch him move across the field, he takes my breath away.

    Though raised on quarter horses, I’ve ridden countless types of incredible horses on three different continents. I galloped a magnificent Pure Spanish Horse across a lupine covered glacier valley high in the Andes and later swam him across a spring-swollen swift-flowing river and I wish I could have brought him home. I brought an unforgettable memory home instead. There are so many wonderful types of horses and each one has its own appeal! But for me there is nothing like a Paso Fino. Fine-tuned spirited energetic and willing. Just like sportscars, they aren’t for everybody. They’re too quick, independent, complex, and temperamental for they choose who they love. But they chose me, and I believe in love at first sight.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by Mapale Mapale.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Wow–some great stories here. I too would like to hear from other posters!

    Pheets, that’s a fascinating, beautifully lit photo–thanks for telling us about the story behind it. My first ASB was accident-prone, as well, and got a bloody fissure in his side from an incompletely slid bolt on his stall door, not nearly as deep as your mare’s injury. (At that point his owner–she lived in Kentucky and my husband was still training horses–gave him to me.) His final accident, not his fault, turned him into a wobbler who didn’t know where his hind feet were. I had him put down. I’m glad the ending of your mare’s story is happier!

    Mapale, I’m glad to hear that your horses match your spirit! I was actually planning to look for a gaited horse of some kind when my friend offered me Scout. He’s three-gaited–although it’s easy enough to teach an ASB to rack, I probably won’t–and because he has a lot of natural animation (he was shown some), at the trot he can bounce me so high out of the saddle that it’s no longer under me when I come back down. I’m working him at a jog so I can sit to the trot. He’s learning. We’re both learning. 😉

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    My picture is of Joe Joe (aka The Artful Dodger, registered name G Proof It), a retired racing Arabian rescued by some very wonderful people from a slaughter lot. He is bright, very kind, and playful. He used to be low horse on the totem pole in his field, but since he got his own person he has become king of everything. The photo was taken while I was getting his lunch (food is his favorite thing). When we met, he knew only to go, go fast and run for his life. With the help of Smartpak, he now has a topline, hindquarters and a chest with muscles, and we are trying very hard to learn about balance, flexibility and collection.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    That’s where Scout came from–a kill yard in Pennsylvania. He too had been picked on by the other horses, in spite of his size. A wonderful person rescued him, too. I think his EPM is what got him to the kill yard. I can’t imagine why someone would want to squeeze a few more dollars out of a sick animal by taking him to an auction where the kill yard was his obvious fate. Joe-Joe and Scout are the lucky ones. And so are we, to have them.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I wish I could give them all a happy home. It breaks my heart.

    It is never the horse's fault

    ShilohsGirl ShilohsGirl
    Topics Started: 7Replies Posted: 49

    My pic is of me jumping Riff Raff(22), an national champion, horse off the year winner ect. I came for my lesson one day, only to find my horse lame. My instructor told me to use 22 instead. At 28 years old, and just coming off an injury, he carried me around the course (2’6″) with so much heart.
    He is such a wonderful horse. Besides being a national champion. He totes the lesson kids around, my sister who is terrified of horses just loves him. Whenever she rides him, she just lights up and relaxes, and cantered for the first time. He looked like he was carrying a basket of eggs on his back…
    22 was also the savior of a boy at out barn. This boy has autism and was struggling in life. He was failing out of school, wouldn’t talk or make friends. when he met 22, everything changed. He would spend hours talking to this horse, and he began to excel.
    We are trying to get breyer to make a model of him, but we’ll see.

    "Think of riding as a science, but love it as an art" ~George Morris

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    As I may have mentioned, I love these game old geldings, and how much of themselves they give to us. Heartwarming about 22’s relationship with your sister, and particularly the autistic boy. I enjoyed reading your account–thanks for sending it!
    Joe-Joe, I’m curious about your background. I wish somebody had been around when I was a beginning rider to tell me how to fall off a horse. That would have been a truly useful lesson!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I learned to ride from a very wise man – he knew more about horses than anyone else I have ever met. Since falling is part of riding, he thought we should know how to do it safely (or as safely as possible).

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Let me rephrase that, Joe-Joe. 😉 Were you always interested in jumping? I’ve ridden every seat except saddle seat, and the only formal lessons I had were in dressage, as an adult. All I’ve ever done is trail ride. I do love watching open jumpers doing their thing, though!

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Shiloh’s Girl – what a great post! Thanks for sharing the story of RiffRaff!

    pheets had a very interesting idea that gives us a way to share lots of wonderful horse personalities.

    And since I’ve already *fallen for* Artful Dodger, learning to fall seems like a reasonable thing to do.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

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