Retraining a neglected horse

This topic contains 11 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by riding for Christ riding for Christ 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • Desiree&Adelina Original Poster Desiree&Adelina
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    I have a thuroughbred cross that I have been working with for almost two years. She is super sweet and loves cuddling, but when it comes to working she goes to what she knows. One major problem that seems to be continuous is the fact that when it comes to mounting someone needs to be there keeping her still with a treat. If not she will take off with the rider.(we had a trainer come out once and he was not happy) We are doing really well, but It is kind of difficult when I try to ride without a instructor or friend near by (she won’t take off with me but she will walk off on her own- I try to mount in a round pen if no one is available to help me). Other than that she will try to cooperate with what she knows as long as she trusts the rider… and with treats as a reward.
    also does anyone have any tips on getting a horse on the bit?
    Thank you!

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    First, you don’t get your horse on the bit – he or she must reach for it. There are a number of discussions on this in other sections – check them out.

    As to the mounting issue, you will need a helper in the beginning. Have someone there while you mount, but YOU have the treat (make sure she is aware of it) and don’t give it to her until you are on and she is standing. Once that is accomplished, she has earned the treat, and you give it to her. Vary your routine with her (horses get bored too). Some days, just get on and off. Other days, do whatever it is you normally do. On other days, just have her walk both ways of the ring and dismount. This will ensure that she does not know what to expect, and she won’t start off on her own, but will wait to see what you want her to do. There are probably a million different ways to reach your goal, but this has worked for me with many different horses.

    Good luck!

    It is never the horse's fault

    Desiree&Adelina Original Poster Desiree&Adelina
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Thanks,

    I will continue and try out what you said. I actually recently started trying to do different things on different rides to mix it up, so I will see how the process is.

    Thank you about the bit, I will go and read more about it.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    The bit thing is more seat and legs than hands. You could also look at Master Dressage (Peter Dove) on Facebook. You want the horse to move forward into the bit rather than using your hands to bring her back to it.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Desiree&Adelina Original Poster Desiree&Adelina
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    I will go check out his Facebook page. Thanks for the help and information. 🙂

    kwsparkle@gmail.com
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I had the same problem once. We taught one of my previous horses to stand still with this method. When you go to get on and they walk off back them up. Do this ever time, and don’t let them get away with it. When they do get it give them a reward, but don’t let them walk off right away. Have them stand still for a few moments, then walk off.

    Hope this helps good luck💕

    Desiree&Adelina Original Poster Desiree&Adelina
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Awesome,
    I will give it a try and thanks for the help! Will keep in mind for our next ride.

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    I have had the same problem before and I found a really great tip for this.
    As the rider is mounting they need to watch if the horse is going to move. If the horse does move, stop it and back it up a step. Then try again. It make take a few tries but this definitely worked for the same problem that I had.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    One other very, very old thing I was taught (back when I had to walk to the stable uphill both ways in the snow, with dinosaurs nipping at my heels) is to face the rear of the horse, turn the stirrup to you, and mount. That way, even if the horse does start to walk off, her motion will just put you right up in the saddle. Obviously the horse should learn to stand, but if you are alone and want to ride, this should at least help you get on with a minimum of difficulty.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Desiree&Adelina Original Poster Desiree&Adelina
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 4

    Riding For Christ and Joe-Joe,
    Thank you for the help and I will definitely try mounting that way on her tomorrow(she will be surprised)! Riding For Christ, I have been doing something similar to what you said and we have actually had a lot of success lately, so thank you to everyone and all the help you have given to me. Adelina and I are Extremely thankful.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Best of luck to you both – a calm horse is a happy horse, and that can only make the rider happier!

    It is never the horse's fault

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    Your welcome! I like to hear that people are enjoying there horse more and more.

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