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Ring sour horse

This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Joan Fry 2 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • ciaraj28 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 1

    I have a warmblood who is ring sour because he was worked too hard when he was little. He is an amaze jumper he was worth a lot of money. We gave him an entire year off and now he’s better but he’s starting to buck again when people are riding him. He is fully sound and has had the chiropractor look at him and he is very well. He is perfect on trails just not in the ring or when we ride in the paddock. Anybody have any suggestions?

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Can you turn him out in the ring and play a game (NOT tag)? Or give him something tasty? Anything to make the ring a happy place for him to be? Then reintroduce him to working by just sitting on him bareback while he is playing?

    It is never the horse's fault

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    Probably NOT what you want to hear and plenty will disagree with accepting it but just maybe, Horse is done with the ring and deserves a new/different career.

    It happens.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    morgan_skilling
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 6

    Have you had a professional trainer evaluate him?

    The wind of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears.

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Pheets has raised a very good point. Years ago in southern California, a woman was competing in advanced level dressage with her mustang. He was a natural-born good mover, but he rarely completed a test because he’d blow up. Just lose it–bucking, rearing, almost out of control. I was impressed with what this woman had accomplished, but she needed to find something her mustang actually enjoyed doing. FORCING him to be a dressage horse when he couldn’t mentally handle it was not fair to her horse.

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    I agree with you and with Pheets. However, for some of us there is nowhere else to ride but the ring, so trying to make it more enjoyable for the horse might be the only option. The size of the ring might also be a factor – ours is huge, and there are a lot of things available to do than just ride around the rail, even if others are using it.

    It is never the horse's fault

    morgan_skilling
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 6

    Sounds like mixing it up might be a good place to start. Check out the obstacles you can set up at https://www.actha.us/obstacles. Get your horse’s brain working on something else. He may literally be bored out of his mind.

    The wind of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    IF the horse really IS done with the ring, to be sold/rehomed/repurposed should be discussed (I do not say this lightly: I know WELL how this is far more easily said than done, and that this might not even be the case). I agree and second having a GOOD professional trainer take a look-see before deciding. I understand and sympathize with limited riding options yet there are certainly enough quality horses out there that WILL enjoy the ring that to force this animal to comply, IF a hands-on professional comes to the same/similar conclusion, is unfair, unsafe, and will be progressively negative for all involved. Learning how to ride on this horse, or trying to train/compete successfully will be an exercise in war maneuvres if he stays in the ring and genuinely can’t handle it anymore.

    So as NOT to be the resident Deb Downer, it IS possible that keeping him to lower levels, more active yet easy gymnastical exercises, Western instead of English on Tuesday, pleasure instead of dressage on Wednesday, games instead of jumpers on Thursday, different buddies in the ring, a few cookies now and then : ), even agility/utility activities with little to no pressure to perform, just play preferably in a group, might help him come around, if he will. I know he was worth good money when he was competing but too much, too young, and limits can develop, mentally, physically, financially, often for life.

    I hope he settles for you, he sounds like a good horse just gone iffy due to a few stoopy humans (the ones that burnt him out in the first place, not you, OP).

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    Depending on what the trainer says–and not to be Cynical Sadie, do NOT use this barn’s resident trainer (too much potential for a conflict of interest)–you might want to change barns if the ring is the only place you can ride. There are plenty of disciplines that an athletic, talented horse and an owner like you–who’s willing to work with his limitations–can successfully compete in. Like pheets, I hope the two of you can work it out.

    ciaraj28 Original Poster
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 1

    He was at a big barn and then I moved him to a little barn to give him time off after he wouldn’t work in the ring. And the trainer at the barn isn’t big on him. Don’t get me wrong she’s likes him but she isn’t saying what I want to hear. She’s saying the truth and trying to see if he is getting any better in the ring.

    Joan Fry
    Topics Started: 11Replies Posted: 324

    I congratulate you for your honesty–that the trainer isn’t saying what you want to hear. I clicked on the link that one of the posters supplied, for the American Competitive Trail Horse Association, and some of their “obstacles” are really creative. Do check it out! The first one is a stock-horse spin. Some are derived from dressage. Others require that you dismount from your horse, lead him someplace, and re-mount. One involves dragging something behind you. Others–the visuals are so ambiguous I don’t have a clue what they want! But when you’re finished, you would have a horse that pays close attention to what you ask him to do and then does it, and is pretty spook-proof, as well.

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