Ulcer advice – any supplement suggestions?

This topic contains 30 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  Olim2005 2 years, 6 months ago.

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  • Piper
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 6

    I concur with Michelle’s approach. I have an OTTB that suffered with moderate to severe ulcers (gastric and hind gut), and instead of going the omeprazole route at all, I relied on his ability to heal–and blind faith in what I felt was a practical approach and in the products I chose. By providing a grain-free and sugar-free diet and adding rice bran oil, Succeed and SmartGut, I address the root cause of the ulcers and boost his healing ability. I gave Succeed (full doses/tubes) both a.m. & p.m., and after 3 months, switched the p.m. to SmartDigest Ultra. Since he is my foxhunting mount, I also gave him the whole summer off of work to ensure his stress level remained low. Now that we’re getting back into work in preparation for hunt season, I’m bringing him around slowly, keeping him on Succeed in the morning and SmartDigest Ultra + SmartGut Ultra in the evening; but I also plan on dosing him with SmartDigest Ultra tubes before I load him to trailer him anywhere.

    I agree that messing with the acid/ph levels potentially creates more issues, but I really like the healing ingredients in SmartGut Ultra, and I wish it didn’t have the antacids in it, but don’t think the antacid affect it has is significant enough to cause me concern for rebound affects. (I also feed it in the evening, when his tummy will not be exposed to more food through the night. So it’s just my thought that the antacid will just help support the healing ingredients supporting him throughout the night.)

    It is my ongoing objective to ensure his whole GI tract is functioning properly, and avoid recurring ulcers throughout the entire system. I love my sport and will always take extra care in stressful times, but in a way to support the normal GI function. Since horses respond nicely to the natural approach, I wouldn’t risk a hindgut issue by focussing on just stomach ulcers with omeprazole or prescription products unless my horse goes entirely off his feed for more than a couple of days.

    dessie
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    Try and get to the reason your horse has ulcers. A horse produces stomach acid 24/7 unlike a human who only produces it when they eat. Horses are grazers by nature in the wild they will roam and graze 20 hrs a day. Try and ensure your horse has good hay ad lib and is turned out as much as possible. We dont feed ration as its like bombing the stomach with a time bomb but grow barley grass which is totally alkaline. Stress also results in ulcers. We found Omepracote a cure before we found barley grass

    Dragon Tea Dragon Tea
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 18

    Succeed did not work for us. Not only that but it turned my horse into an absolute nut case. I even filed a report with Smartpak about it. He went through a severe personality change where he became dangerous to ride. As soon as we took him off of the product… next few days and bam right back to normal.

    Look thoroughly through the product ingredients and consult your vet about it before doing any changes.

    Piper
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 6

    Wow, Dragon Tea, how long did you feed the Succeed to your horse before you discontinued it? And what ingredients in the Succeed do you think contributed to your horse’s erratic behavior?

    Dragon Tea Dragon Tea
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 18

    Funny enough, Succeed did work for about a month to clear up his GI problem. But it was not worth it in the long run to keep him on it to me with the personality change. I fed the supplement for three months from January to March 2012. The first bucket I got from a vet supply and then I was so excited after the first month to see it worked. I kept him on it for three months. I am in no way an expert on ingredients so for that answer I couldn’t say what may have affected him.

    It seems to work for a lot of people! So it may be worth it to give it a try. I had called a Vet at in a very prestigious PA vet clinic and she said in all cases of GI problems that are severe they start all the horses with Succeed. The personality change is rare but it can happen.

    Piper
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 6

    Thanks for the info! Very interesting. I’ve been feeding it just over three months to two of my horses. My young Holsteiner mare seems to be doing extremely well with it as we train and learn new things together. It really seems to mitigate stress that might otherwise potentially cause set backs. But my 14 y.o. OTTB gelding, who has been on Succeed for nearly 4 months, has recently begun protesting during workouts and just hacking. Is that what you encountered?

    cleo_hampton
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 3

    A trick to soothing the stomach and helping with acid would be alfalfa pellets and Aloe juice. The aloe juice about a cup to two cups once to twice a day depending on how sore they feel, will help the lining of stomach but also soothe it. Our horse has had chronic ulcers and the alfalfa pellets with aloe juice after treatment of Ulcergard, has worked like a charm.
    If you cant afford it Id go with ritidine, or even start her on a G.U.T- the supplement because she could be having something different than ulcers. There are numerous things it could be besides ulcers.

    kindle kindle
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 20

    we have a project rescue in (6 yr old TBH, retired racing horse), that is a puzzle of gastric problems unknown. We took this horse to equine vet, then took him to two specialist for his guts. they ran xrays, enzyme tests, dyes imagining for gut, mri’s, and other tests. nothing was found, not an ulcer, not colic, not any bowel problems, no blood anywhere leaking, etc etc etc.
    now this horses symptoms is laying down and behavior of colic, his episodes can last from 5 min to 4 hours. he is in pain and suffers greatly.
    we tried various herbs, any suggestions that anyone offered us for him trying to help him in any way we could, never losing hope. we began using the SUCCEED PASTE several months ago and this horse is getting better. we are continuing his SUCEED with great success and improvements. we have not had an episode or discomforts from this horse in over 4 months now. he had 10 episodes prior to SUCCEED. I highly recommend the SUCCEED for any horse having some kind of gut or colic problems.

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    "There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results." - Kenneth Blanchard

    kindle kindle
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 20

    since dec 2013 when I posted of the horse (6 yr old TBH, retired racing horse) with gut problems and the use of succeed for this horse, we have been off the succeed per the instructions of usage and have no incidents of gut or problems since. this horse is today healthy, beautiful and happy. we had another horse come in on rescue with some kind of gut conditions and again used the succeed, and guess what? no more issues with this rescue’s guts either, all good, happy and feeling frisky, like they should be. smile. just wanted to update everyone about these projects and the succeed that has recovered and helped these two horses recover and heal the pain they had suffered.

    "There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results." - Kenneth Blanchard

    Rolex2021
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I suggest using Ulcerguard to treat the ulcers (for about 12-15 days). After that, as a preventative measure, I feed my horse cabbage juice which I soak in beet pulp so that she’ll eat it. Cabbage juice works wonders on my OTTB with very sensitive ulcers, and is very cheap.

    deborah_johnson
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    My mare started to colic, and we finally put it all together, she had ulcers. I treated her for 30 days with ulcer guard, two months with Abler’s product, and saw some improvement. I had heard about Succeed, and decided to try that since she was still having issues. Great improvement with that, and she starting to be that horse I always knew she was. She’s actually rather sweet when not in pain. I still think 30 days with ulcer guard, rx gastro guard or whatever you vet rx’s, is critical. You cannot scope for hind gut ulcers but Succeed does have a test kit you can use. You can also add a hind gut buffer if your horse is on pasture, that helps break down sugars for pasture horses. Do not use bute paste as it will exasperate condition and potentially send your horse into a bad colic. Happened to me. This is also via the equine vet, so you don’t have to take my word for it. Since around 70% of horses have them, (3 out of 5 of mine), I treated everyone. If you have a good equine chiro, he/she can also determine if your horse is suffering from ulcers. There is a lot of good info on the web, so educate yourself, keeps something going through that gut, and be mindful of how you even ride your horse. Keep your horse’s life and yours, as stress free as you can. This is supposed to be fun for both of you.

    deborah_johnson
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Succeed has been the only thing that I have seen any kind of improvement. They also sell a test kit that you can do yourself, but sounds like you are doing fine. Glad your guy is feeling better.

    kindle kindle
    Topics Started: 2Replies Posted: 20

    With taking in all kinds of rescue horses, and all kinds of breeds, my success for any gut problems, no matter what the causes, is the succeed. The product has a guarantee on it, and if your horse colics, smartpak will even reimburse the colic care medical needed for your horse on the succeed, there is another product that has the same guarantee factors with it, but prefer the succeed as it works so much faster for those horses in desperate conditions (such as change of environments and starved down gut problems) . have yet any need of reimbursements for succeed. I won’t use anything else and the vets as blessed and helpful as they are, they are limited to what they can do for a colicky horse, or those that colic more then once.
    we have had gut problems from belly bot flies, to ulcers, and even some unknown conditions and no reason for colic symptoms (not colic, unidentified conditions). The Succeed has CURED every one of these horses that were destined to surgery, or euthanizations. happy and living and no more problems or gut issues in any of them.

    "There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results." - Kenneth Blanchard

    kathleen_santorowinters
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    In my experience, one of my horses had ulcers pretty bad. After having 3 episodes of impaction colic in a very short time I decided to get him scoped. The only way to truly know about ulcers is to get them scoped by a vet. He was on Gastro Guard for 2 months which yes is very costly but it takes the guessing game out of it all. I had him scoped again and his ulcers were healed. I use Ulcer Guard when we take him to shows and make any changes.
    The biggest thing we changed was his feed. This particular horse now gets Soaked Timothy pellets 3 times a day. No more hay for him and he is doing great. I hope this helps.

    ohminsun
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 7

    I’ve had good success with G.U.T. after it was difficult for me to afford SmartGut; I had a horse who was very prone to ulcers and G.U.T. helped keep things in the clear after treating with Gastro Guard. In the meantime, if we were going to go to a show or travel anywhere, I would give half a tube of Ulcer Guard the day before the show, every day of the show, and the day after (when we came back home), and it seemed to prevent further ulcers from occurring.

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    Lynn

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