What do you know about Thrush?

This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Marty 1 year, 3 months ago.

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  • jan_kast Original Poster
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 26

    Theres a horse at our stable battling thrush for about a year now. All the reasons I know of that cause thrush are not in play here. Very clean dry stall and pasture turn out all day. Excellent care from owner. The gelding is being treated aggressively now by a second vet. Perhaps this time he will heal properly.

    I wonder if any one knows of new theories on the causes of thrush?

    Janice1958
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Ive been told too much sweet food will cause thrush. I was dealing with thrush eith my 2 geldings also for over a year, but mine are on pasture year round. We have very eey winters here so just contributed it to that, but now I broke down once again to something else supposedly for thrush and for once I finally found something that works so amazingly, it’s like a miracle! It’s called No Thrush and the farm store and tractor supply here in Chehalis, WA carry it. You can also go oblige to nothrush.com and order it. I’ve been using now for about 2 weeks although the thrush was nearly gone in 1 week. Friday I will cut it down to once a week for a while till the frog and the sulcus (I think that’s what it’s called) is healed and then on a monthly maintenance schedule. Hope rhis helps.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by  Janice1958. Reason: Please delete this copy
    Janice1958
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    I’ve been told too much sweet food will cause thrush. I was dealing with thrush with my 2 geldings also for over a year, but mine are on pasture year round. We have very wet winters here so just contributed it to that, but now I broke down once again to something else supposedly for thrush and for once I finally found something that works! It’s so amazingly, it’s like a miracle! It’s called No Thrush and the farm store and tractor supply here in Chehalis, WA carry it. You can also go online to nothrush.com and order it. I’ve been using it now for about 2 weeks although the thrush was nearly gone in 1 week. Friday I will cut it down to once a week for a while till the frog and the sulcus (I think that’s what it’s called) is healed and then on a monthly maintenance schedule. Hope this helps.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by  Janice1958. Reason: To correct spelling
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by  Janice1958.
    fqhrfrenzy fqhrfrenzy
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    Thrush is naturally accruing so it will always be present. The hoof anatomy and genetics of the horse can cause and actual Thrush infection itself. When Thrush actually becomes an “infection” is when the the bacteria get trapped. This can be caused by poor trimming from the farrier, basically not cutting back extra tissues from around the frog and such allows crevices where the thrush can be safe and sound to multiply. Another factor is purely hoof genetics. If for example the horse has contracted heals, it has a poor ability for that area of the hoof to breathe. Air kills bacteria and if its locked in there, its a breading ground for bacteria and fungus. Again a farrier can help that situation as well.

    Dry stalls do not always help thrush infections. Having overly dry feet can actually make it worse. If the thrush becomes “trapped” and started to encapsulate, what happens is that it turns into an incubator for it to grow and it gets tar like and started eating away the hoof and from that point you can get a much worse problem if it gets bad enough that it starts getting into the sensitive structures of the hoof.

    Best things to keep from having thrush become a problem is to pick out the hooves very often like daily or more, proper trimming and shoeing and not letting the hooves get too overgrown. Using thrush treatment to help kill whats there is OK but you need to remember its a naturally occurring bacteria that has a purpose so if you use treatment too much it can damage the hoof tissues causing more problems.

    If you use 50% bleach and water, DO NOT use turpentine on the hoof (can make pretty smoke, good luck catching the horse when your done) and do not get it on the hairline as it can damage hair follicles and leave white hairs permanently above the hooves.

    Lwitt
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I had the same problem as you and tried all kinds of treatments. My horse had deep Sulcus thrush. I finally found a product that worked! Its called NO THRUSH ! This stuff is awesome. It is a powder-not liquid. My horses thrush cleared up with in about 1 ½ weeks. I just made sure when applying it that I got it down in the sulcus all the way(his crack was really deep) I would gently and carefully separate his sulcus with a hoof pick and then insert the tip of the product and fill the crack with the powder. My horse was kept in a clean dry area at all times like your horse so I don’t know why he got it either. My only thought is my farrier always takes off a lot of frog and I have been reading a lot and according to how the mechanics of the frog is supposed to work it should barely be shorter than the heel so that it will contact the ground when the hoof flexes so that blood flow is stimulated. His were trimmed out so much that there is no way his frog would ever contact the ground to stimulate the blood flow so maybe this is why mine developed thrush-since his frog was not being properly stimulated?

    jan_kast Original Poster
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 26

    Hi- I started this forum and want to update. Thrush was diagnosed on this horse a year ago by a barefoot trimmer. After a year and no cure, a vet was called in. The vet also treated for Thrush and recommended shoes for this horse. When a farrier came to shoe, he saw no Thrush, trimmed the frog, did not shoe. I want people to know sometimes it takes many experts and months to decide what is happening with our horses. I am going to say case closed on this forum. Thanks to you who responded, i learned more about thrush through this forum

    Jsrumreich
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I sympathize! I had a horse with thrush to varying degrees for almost 5 years no matter what I did. I was meticulous about her stall, food, and exercise and used thrush medicine as needed when really bad. She was trimmed regularly by a good farrier. Nothing seemed to fully get rid of it until she was diagnosed with an ulcer and treated with Omeprazole. The thrush cleared up as a nice little side benefit and no more problems with it. Depending on your vet, it can be really expensive to test for and treat ulcers. Mine used the approach of looking at very clear symptoms of an ulcer instead of testing and just trying generic ulcer med (omeprazole) for 30 days so the cost was affordable for me. Hopefully if you try this route you will have a vet with the same approach. Good luck.

    fqhrfrenzy fqhrfrenzy
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 2

    From a Farriers standpoint, the vet said put shoes on your horse then it still didn’t get done. It sounds to me that the thrush issue is simply the horses hoof genetics. Not sure why the farrier wouldn’t do what the vet said in the first place, that is kind of rule one. They do have a higher education. I have shod horses in 5 states and the worst states for thrush are the dryer states with softer ground. Florida is bad even thou its a wet state because the ground is very soft everywhere. This causes hoof contraction which causes the Commissure too deepen and the heels to contract which in turn causes thrush in the frog cleft as well.

    Every time I hear the words Barefoot Trimmer I get scared. There is no model for hoof trimming, shoeing and alignment. Its all genetics and you work to make the horse what it is going to be and correct defects that humans have caused due to selective breeding.

    If you farrier is not comfortable shoeing your horse like the vet wants then it may be time to locate a different Farrier. Some horses need shoes plan and simple. Being a Farrier I have one mare that does and one that doesn’t. It just happens. I do not have a Thrush issue at all. Both horses have beautiful conformation just one is tender footed and thin walled. Thanks to human intervention for making horses “pretty” and not hearty.

    jan_kast Original Poster
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 26

    Thanks for some solid advice. The owner of the horse in question feels like her problem has been solved by better hoof trimming by a farrier. I agree with your thoughtful points made. I think we can retire the topic at this time

    riding for Christ riding for Christ
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 118

    You can treat horse with thrush by washing the horses foot in bleach. Put bleach on the top and bottom and don’t get on their skin. Bleach kills the bacteria and dries it.
    One of the people above said something about feed causing this, it may, so I would suggest a pelleted feed if you don’t already feed it. A pelleted feed with a high fat content. I feed Total Equine and it is a really good feed. Horses look really great on it and they are getting what they need from it.

    Marty
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 1

    I was just told by a farrier to use Tomorrow – it is used for mastitis in cows. It comes in a tube like dewormer. (http://www.bi-vetmedica.com/species/cattle/products/ToMorrow.html) Use cotton, put Tomorrow in the sulcus, pack in some cotton and leave it. It will grow out with the healthy hoof.

    Then use spray on Thrush Ender (www.silvetrasol.com).

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