Join the conversation! Login or register to ask your question or help a fellow rider.
Call us 24/7 - 1-800-461-8898

what type of tack or a half quarter horse and half Arabian?? Help

This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  MHBTAvatar 2 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • kenna_hill Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    I’m needing to start getting tack for my half Arabian and half quarter horse for when I’m read to start riding him/her not born yet lol:) I just had an Arabian gelding while back before he was stolen off the property I had him staying on soi had jus all Arabian tack for him!! So I’m very confused on tack for this one!? please help

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Regardless of breed, your tack should fit your horse properly, and you cannot know what that will be until you have the horse. As s/he grows, you might need to change anyway, as what fits a 2 year old may not fit a 5 year old. The discipline you choose will also affect the tack you need. Both my horses are Arabians, but they wear different size halters, bridles and saddles.

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Since you have no way of knowing if he’ll have a small arab head or a larger QH – either could happen – you can’t even get a halter. He could be all QH in confirmation or all arab – and over time more of the recessed breed could appear as he develops. I understand your impatience, but you’ll just have to wait. Congrats on the baby – I have friends with Quarabs – it’s a great combo!

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    kenna_hill Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    Thanks for all the info its my first time having a foal my other horse was almost 15years old so all this is new to me from the other siblings pictures it likes like it has a arab head and quarter horse body will attach a. Picture of the other two siblings

    kenna_hill Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 2

    The first picture is the older brother the second is his sister all full blood siblings

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    There is no guarantee that he (she) will be the same size as his (her) siblings, no matter how much similarity in looks there may be. You are going to go through a multitude of blankets and halters during the growing years. Bridles are fairly adjustable, but bit and saddle sizes are extremely important, or neither of you will be comfortable or happy. For now, I would suggest you concentrate on a layette for your baby! School clothes can wait.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Joe-Joe Joe-Joe. Reason: Frozen fingers - can't type!

    It is never the horse's fault

    Joe-Joe Joe-Joe
    Topics Started: 17Replies Posted: 1205

    Very nice!

    It is never the horse's fault

    Mapale Mapale
    Topics Started: 4Replies Posted: 421

    Beautiful horses, kenna! Looks like arab faces – you could get a pony halter to begin with, or small cowboy halter that will grow as he/she does. And if you are looking for something to buy – invest in some good horse training books. I recommend “Consider the Horse” by Mark Rashid or look for topics in the area where your interest lies, ie., H/J or dressage or western trail. You can’t really get anything tangible, but it never hurts to seek information. I hope your baby is as nice in conformation as his/her siblings. Nice.

    Alois Podhajsky: “When I hear somebody talk about a horse being stupid, I figure it’s a sure sign that animal has outfoxed them. ...

    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 249

    Raising a baby will be a mixture of fun & frustration. You can’t rush the growing up of a horse anymore than you can that of a human baby, so relax and enjoy the trip.

    However, in the meantime, you can educate yourself on tack so when the time comes you will already be knowledgeable enough to pick the right tack the first time. As others have already pointed out, Arabians & part Arabians tend to have smaller heads than the heads of other breeds of the same height & weight. So there is a good chance you will need cob sized bridles. How tall is the AQHA parent, and how tall is the Arabian parent? Which is the sire & which is the dam? Typically, most of the size will come from the mare, but every rule with horses has exceptions. Generally, if you want a larger body with the Arabian brain, brilliance, and desire to please, an Arabian Stallion on a big AQHA mare is more likely to produce this body shape than an AQHA stallion on an Arabian mare. Unfortunately, breeding horses has more exceptions than rules. If this sire and dam have been bred before, how big did those full brother/sisters end up at maturity? Also, keep in mind that Arabians & part Arabians can be very slow maturing horses, and can surprise you, putting the last couple of inches on between ages 5 & 8.

    If you get the classic petite Arabian head, you may need narrower bits, as many adult Arabians take 4-1/2″ bits. But you are a good three years off from worrying about bits.

    Depending on where you are located, & when the baby is due, you may need a stall blanket or T/O for the little one. Babies grow so fast that they can easily outgrow blankets at an incredible rate, but there are some tricks, most of which do not seem to be widely known. Miniature Horses and baby horses have the same body shape. The difference is that the baby’s back & legs will keep getting longer, while the adult mini may gain or lose weight, but the back length will not change. One of the problems with buying blankets for baby horses is that there are 3 basic categories of horses that will need blankets between 36″ & 48″: Adult miniature horses, foals, & ponies. Adult minis & foals have an almost identical body shape, but adult ponies are almost always broader through the chest and rib cage. This means that a 40″ blanket that correctly fits a pony will be too big through the chest for a mini or a foal. Blanket manufacturers and sellers don’t tell prospective buyers this, and since most blanket manufacturers only blankets that will typically fit the largest of the 3 body shapes (that of the pony), you can measure and re-measure your foal and the blanket that is the correct size will not fit through the chest. It has more to do with the angle of the neckline than anything else, and a dart on each side can be added to correct the fit, or armed with knowledge, you buy a blanket designed for a miniature horse. And if you buy one without a tailguard, and one that has a back length longer than the current back length of your foal, babykins can & will grow into the the longer back length. The chest sizes of the mini blankets don’t change that much between sizes 36″ & 48″, the primarily difference is the back length. However, one must buy a blanket without a tailguard, so the extra length just sticks straight out. A tailguard will weigh the extra length down, and you want it to stick straight out. Yes, this could provoke some serious blanket pull games, but most mares are very protective of their babies, and that protective shield gets extended to the baby’s blanket. This also works much better with waterproof T/O’s, which can be used as stall blankets, because the waterproof nylon is stiffer than the material used for most stall blanks.

    Your youngster may still outgrow a winter blanket, depending on where you are geographically, and how early/late in the spring the baby is born, but this can reduce your blanket purchases from a 1 a month to a couple over the first few months of the foals life.

    The other initial thing you will probably want to be thinking about are halters. The earlier you can get baby used to having a halter put on and taken off, the better. But you have a similar fit problem here too. There are some adjustable halters made for mini horses that adjust on both the throat latch and the underside of the noseband that also fit foals. The adjustable throat latch is a very useful feature, as babies have a tendency to scratch their heads with a back foot, and if the throat latch can not be adjusted short enough, babykins can bet a back foot caught in it.

    If you need help finding suppliers, let me know.

    MHBTAvatar
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 31

    How exciting! I can understand being anxious to start buying anything and everything you may want or need for your new addition, but, as stated above, a saddle and bridle won’t even be on the radar for 3-4 years. They can be huge investments and it would be very sad to buy something now only to find out when the time comes that it’s not going to fit, or is no longer what you want. Tack manufacturers are coming up with new innovations and improvements all the time and in 3 years you could be looking at the latest and greatest and thinking, “why did I ever buy this outdated old thing? It doesn’t even have the new ostrich-feather flocking everyone loves!” By the time your baby is ready, you may even have changed your interests and want to train your horse for a discipline that’s not even on your radar yet!

    True story – – I still own 2 blankets that don’t fit my horse because I was so excited in my pre-pony-purchase preparations (supposedly just shopping for some basics – new buckets, grooming tools etc) to come across an incredible deal on some pony-wear. I thought, I know pretty specifically what size & build horse I’m looking for . . . for such a great deal, surely this size blanket will work! Ha Ha – WRONG!! Two weeks later I brought home a perfect boy just a little bigger than I had planned for. And, of course, my old saddle didn’t fit him either – at least I had planned on that. Lesson learned :-)

    My advice: just be patient, stay ‘in the moment’, and enjoy raising a happy, healthy baby one day at a time for the next 3-4 years. (I’m so very jealous!). Then, when he or she is actually ready to begin formal training, start worrying about the big stuff.

    Congratulations!

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Healthy Horses  ❤  Happy Riders