Join the conversation! Login or register to ask your question or help a fellow rider.
Call us 24/7 - 1-800-461-8898

wood eating horses and my findings

This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  techmichelle 3 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • justme4horses Original Poster
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 0

    Horses are made to eat 18 hours daily and can only make saliva while eating, although it is naturally made for us.. when you lock them away in a stall with nothing to eat from am to pm. This is an awful pain they endure from the need to make saliva so you are hurting them. This is not natural for any horse although some may just get ulcers from the ordeal others will eat what ever they can get their teeth over to try and rid the horrible pain from the need to make saliva. Feed a cheaper hay and keep it in your stall or let them out to graze. You are taking away from the horse it is not taking from you. Observe your horse and see what it does on its own. Pay attention and you will see the natural way they eat.

    AmyJean
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 12

    Wow never heard the saliva thing before. Can’t say I believe that one. I’ve owned a horse that always had a wet bit. Ones that get a milk mustache when ridden. And another that will fling spitballs rather gross like while bing ridden. Not too sure how factual your believes are.

    GHFrider GHFrider
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 32

    That’s all true as far as the need to graze constantly, but not so much the “pain” associated with saliva production, and it’s not necessarily related to wood chewing/cribbing/wind-sucking and other idiosyncratic behaviors. My horses are on 24/7 turnout with lots of grass and free-choice hay, yet I have a wood chewer who came with that habit and has been impossible to cure in the 8 years I’ve owned him. He’s 22 now and it’s unlikely I’ll ever get him to give up the bizarre habit. He lips (it’s more a cupping with his tongue than a chewing) his water bucket, feed bucket, metal gates….anything horizontal. And he eats the edge of the top fence board, but only in one area of the farm. He’s never without hay or grass in front of him, and it’s all good quality. There’s lots of research to suggest that a horse who is left standing in a stall for long periods without hay is more likely to develop ulcers because his gut is digesting itself rather than to have pain from lack of saliva. Interesting point of view, but you might want to do more research on it.

    joannemfriedman.blogspot.com
    Horses In the Yard

    techmichelle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 9

    Wood chewing has many causes and many fixes. I also have/had my wood chewers even with 24/7 feed. While a dry mouth can be one of causes, there are also many other causes. Something lacking in their diet, boredom, habit, plain old hunger, ulcers, heck I am sure I am missing a few :-)

    Ashley
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    Wow never heard the saliva thing before. Can’t say I believe that one. I’ve owned a horse that always had a wet bit. Ones that get a milk mustache when ridden. And another that will fling spitballs rather gross like while bing ridden. Not too sure how factual your believes are.

    It absolutely is true.

    http://www.ker.com/library/advances/409.pdf

    “Bicarbonates in saliva buffer the gastric acid and pepsin produced by the pyloric
    portion of the stomach and coat and protect the squamous epithelium in the cardiac
    region. If inadequate saliva is produced by the horse, the pyloric region becomes
    more acidic and the cardiac region is left unprotected from any contact with gastric acid. While gastric acid in the horse is secreted continuously with or without the presence of food (Murray, 1998), horses salivate only when chewing (Alexander and Hickson, 1970). Feeding forages to horses increases the amount of chewing time and consequently the amount of saliva produced (Murray and Schusser, 1989), and forage meals do not stimulate as much gastric acid production as grain meals (Smyth et al., 1988).”

    schepansky.alex schepansky.alex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    Has anyone ever heard of their horse eating their shavings? We switched to pin shavings a few weeks ago and my horse is actually EATING them. He is also a wood chewer outside. My vet said that maybe he was lacking selenium? He has a hanging salt rock, another salt rock on the ground that is 50% selenium, a hanging jolly ball, and a treat ball. Anyone have any thoughts about this?

    schepansky.alex schepansky.alex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    Pine shavings** sorry

    techmichelle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 9

    Hi To totally rule out that he is lacking something in his diet, what did his blood test come back? what is his diet/food? lots of information is needed and input from a nutritionist is very helpful for the official is he lacking something. You mention the vet has checked him and you do offer him selenium, so you might start checking for other reasons.

    Is he a wood chewer if there are other options for staying busy?

    schepansky.alex schepansky.alex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    He blood work came back fine. He gets 1 scoop of legends performance textured which is 11% protein, 10% fat and 12% fiber. It also contains rice bran and flaxseed. He also gets 1 scoop of the Southern States Multi Stock 12% sweet feed.

    He is a wood chewer if there are other options. He is a busy boy so he usually does one thing, then chews, then will get bored with that and start another.

    techmichelle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 9

    From what you are posting you are probably dealing more with behavior/habit then need for basic health. It is good to keep up with yearly or semi-yearly health checks with your vet. I have one that is laid back and so easy, I can almost miss a problem. Then I have one that is such a pain, just has to stay busy, its hard not to jump to a problem. :-)

    You didn’t mention any of these but I would call it the we would like health group. The I wish his hooves where healthier or boy he doesn’t move quite as well as when he was younger, or ?? smartpak does have some nice supplements for this area.

    schepansky.alex schepansky.alex
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 5

    Well when I have Moose get his coggins, I always have the vet do a thorough exam as well. He has no problem with movement, he is still young. He’s 6. But I was looking to put him on the SmartPak Ultra Combo. I love that it has the hoof, digest, joint, and coat all together. Any thoughts?

    techmichelle
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 9

    Combos do help simplify life :-). Sometimes its money sometimes its mood for if I do combos or individual items. LOL. I do like to keep mine on a digest support. I have a tendency to off and on do the hoof and coat and joint. :-)

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Recent Topics
Healthy Horses  ❤  Happy Riders