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Young TB/QH, hard keeper, should I be concerned?

This topic contains 46 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by pheets pheets 3 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 47 total)
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  • EquineMelody Original Poster
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 29

    About 2 months ago I bought a 4 year old Thoroughbred/Quarter Horse mix, and he’s definitely a hard keeper. I ride him 2-3 times a week, for about an hour each time. I board him, and he’s in a fairly large dry pen 24/7, he can’t be out on pasture because he bullies the other horses. The thing is though, he’s so skinny. I can fully see his ribs from a good distance away, and he just looks so scrawny. He’s 16.1 hands, so he’s not tiny, but he looks it. He also has pretty much no muscle whatsoever. So, my question is, seeing as he’s young, is it something I should be concerned over? His ribs are the only thing visible. Or, will they become less visible as he packs on muscle? Or should I get him a weight gain supplement, such as Cool Calories?
    Thanks!

    Also, if a picture would be helpful I can see if I have one.

    9heritage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 4

    Have him checked for ulcers. They are so common in so many horses. Could really help you solve his issue.

    Leslie Leslie
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 44

    Does he have lots of hay in the dry pen? What all is he eating now?

    www.createdbyleslie.com - handmade custom wood-burned brushes, stall signs, & portraits, etched glasses, and custom stuffed ponies

    EquineMelody Original Poster
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 29

    He only has hay yes. No supplements or grain, just hay. The lady who used to own him said she put him on beet pulp for a little while (though he was probably a bit thinner than he is now), and he gained a good amount of weight, and she took him off of it, but now he’s skinny again. I haven’t tried putting weight on him at all, because I thought maybe once he started putting on muscle it would help him fill out.

    harvoose
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 3

    a 4 year old is still growing and you do a fair amount of work with him. He really needs more than hay. I feed my 4 year old TB Filly Blue Seal sentinel LS. She was a little scrawny when I got her as a 2 year old and has grown and filled out beautifully with the LS. I also have her on a little bit of Gleam and Gain.

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Is he getting free choice hay?

    I’d put him on a quality senior feed. Yes, you can feed senior feeds to any age horse, they good ones are low in sugar and easy to digest providing high fat and lots of calories.

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

    Leslie Leslie
    Topics Started: 1Replies Posted: 44

    I agree, provide him with as much hay as he will eat then supplement with something like grain or beet pulp. It is not unusual at all for a horse in work to require more than just hay, in fact in my experience it is unusual for them not to need grain.

    www.createdbyleslie.com - handmade custom wood-burned brushes, stall signs, & portraits, etched glasses, and custom stuffed ponies

    EquineMelody Original Poster
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 29

    Okay, thank you so much guys! What about Cool Calories 100? I’ve heard great things about it being high in fat and calories, without an excess of sugar.

    pheets pheets
    Topics Started: 5Replies Posted: 475

    I would try just feeding him a fuller diet (add grain or forage feeds to his diet as well as free choice hay) without the supps first. He is growing and developing, which are both huge taxers of any diet. You won’t get a full tank’s worth of mileage on half a tank of gas. Can’t build muscle with no food. He will loose/under-develop muscle mass by trying to support other organs. Bodies priouritize the fuel that enters, what needs it gets it so there better be enough to go around the whole boat. ALso consider the drain of coping thru the day’s activities, being ridden regularly, heat, bugs, social issues good and bad, weather, critters that run thru the barn/field at night, all that stuff that we don’t really think about has a huge affect on how well your horse absorbs what he’s fed.

    He might NOT be a hard-keeper, just growing and his body is using up what he’s getting and he’s not getting enough to cover all the bases, thus, he looks/is lean. For now, unless some odd health issue arises, just feed him a more nutrient-complete diet. The above statements are pretty accurate: hay alone for a growing horse is NOT enough. Not to push Triple Crown but their Growth formula is very similar to their Senior blend and can be pretty effective when added to hay.

    Sure there's right and wrong but mostly there's just a whole lotta different.

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Okay, thank you so much guys! What about Cool Calories 100? I’ve heard great things about it being high in fat and calories, without an excess of sugar.

    Do not worry about adding an sort of supplements until you have him on free choice hay and a high quality senior feed.

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

    EquineMelody Original Poster
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 29

    Okay, I got Purina Ultium Growth at the feed store today. I talked to a guy there, and he said the only difference in giving him that versus the senior feed is that it has more fats and proteins which he said is better for younger horses. It’s low in sugar and starches, so I’m assuming it will work well?

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    Okay, I got Purina Ultium Growth at the feed store today. I talked to a guy there, and he said the only difference in giving him that versus the senior feed is that it has more fats and proteins which he said is better for younger horses. It’s low in sugar and starches, so I’m assuming it will work well?

    Well the guy at the feed store is an idiot then. The actual regular Ultium has more fat then the growth, so not a good reason to claim.

    It actually does not have a “low” NSC being it is ~18% last time I checked. I won’t feeding anything over 15%, below that is where we start talking about low NSC.

    Can you get any other better quality brands?

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

    EquineMelody Original Poster
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 29

    Well, I’m glad I got a receipt then… All they really have is Purina… Would the Purina Active Senior or just plain Purina Senior be low in starch and sugar?

    EquineMelody Original Poster
    Topics Started: 6Replies Posted: 29

    Okay, I just checked and the Purina Ultium Competition formula is only 15% NSC… I assumed the competition formula would have been higher in NSC than the growth formula… So maybe I should feed him that? Agh, it’s so confusing. I’m a first time horse owner, if you couldn’t tell…

    PiaffeNPassage PiaffeNPassage
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 25

    The Senior feed is actually up there in NSC somewhere around ~20%

    Can you get any other brands?

    Otherwise I’d just go with the regular Ultium.

    Owned by Imperious 1997 ArabXFriesian Gelding

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