Lizzie Lou

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  • in reply to: Hoof pads/boots
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    My recommendation is Magic Cushion.

    in reply to: Weight maintnance
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    What does the veterinarian think? Purina has a good food for helping TB’s with muscling the top line. . I cannot think of the name right now, but it is fairly new to them, like a year or two old, I think. Some TB horses look skinny when all they need is nutritional help for the toplt line, and others look ribby when it is a lot of fat between the ribs giving that look; but I don’t expect that with a TB. . Sorry if my posts look weird as I’m using my phone and it doesn’t play nice when I try to correct or delete something.

    in reply to: New to Jumping
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    Cavaletti that are height adjustable.. six to eight. My favorites are wooden with X bases on each end. Just poles on the ground can roll, and that can be dangerous. If horse isn’t used to cavaletti, start with one cavaletto. Good, leather girth with elastic on at least one side, bell boots, leg wraps, and of course I agree with Jo about a good helmet and saddle.

    in reply to: Weird soft hoof growth
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    Yes, I see it a lot in my life. We see a whitish line at the top of the hoof. It means the hoof has absorbed more moisture than it can handle. It will go away when the hoof dries out, but prolonged excess moisture can cause damage, and any damage to a hoof toe takes about 12 months to disappear. Maintain the right amount of hoof moisture at all times is tricky. My farrier recommended no turnout when the grass is wet. I check the grass by walking through it and seeing whether my footwear gets damp. Lush pastures or those with areas of tall grass like around manure take the longest to dry. The farrier also said no more than 20 minutes at a time, twice a day after the dew dries off. It isn’t just rain and snow that is the problem, it is heavy dew, and we had that in VA last year. Also, urine in stalls is a problem, so stalls should be heavily bedded and cleaned after each elimination. We use hoof sealants also.

    in reply to: Western saddle advice for someone new to western
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    I see your question was awhile back. Have you picked a western saddle yet? Do still have questions?

    in reply to: Fear of crops, whips, etc.
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    I use a Parelli carrot stick and savvy string. The savvy string comes with a little lash on it. I have one which has no lash because it was either taken off or it fell off. I use that one first or always for the sensitive horses. It is possible to use the string with the lash and not pop a horse with it, but I use the one without the lash to make sure I don’t accidently pop a horse with it. I use it gently over the horse’s back, croup, around legs, over head, with the mindset that I’m getting flies off for the horse. I imagine you know a lot of this anyway. I enjoy your posts. You are quite knowledgeable.

    To help horses get over a scary thing:

    have the horse on a long rope, minimum of 22 feet

    keep yourself between the object and the horse at first

    keep object far enough away that horse doesn’t have a major reaction (don’t go beyond threshold); move it in a rhythmic manner. In the case of a whip or whip-like object, move it left and right, in a fan pattern (wide upside down U)

    lead horse as you hold object and move it in the above manner if possible – objects that move away from horse help increase horse’s confidence and reduce fear

    allow horse to drift if it needs to… to increase its distance from object… to a point, don’t let it leave totally, hang onto that 22 foot rope

    Variables to change over time according to horse’s confidence level: distance to object; whether handler is between object and horse or object is between handler and horse; movement; speed of movement; whether object touches horse

    A common rule…If horse shows fear of something, one has to keep it up. Change the variables, but don’t take the object away until the horse shows some relaxation. If the object is taken away before the horse feels OK about it, then the fear is reinforced. It is like the hook and loop fastener sound (Velcro brand stuff). If a horse is fearful, increase your distance a bit, but put those straps together and apart until the horse doesn’t react anymore. Take the time it takes in what may seem like a long training session. (The fly mask/leg wraps, whatever it is has to be off the horse.)

    When it comes to a whip and such when it is time to touch the horse with it, try to hold it so the handle will be the part that touches the horse (just a visible difference for the horse initially). Have the horse on a 12 foot lead rope. Hold the whip in your left hand if you will be touching the near side of the horse. Hold it in your right hand if you will be touching the off side of the horse. Aim for the withers with the mindset you will rub the horse in a friendly manner with it. Try to keep it in contact with the horse’s withers no matter what the horse does. Keep the horse’s head turned toward you. Stand 45 degrees from horse’s shoulder at first. Try to keep whip in contact with the horse until the horse doesn’t mind it anymore. We aim for the withers because that is where horse buddies groom each other… a friendly part of the body.

    in reply to: New Girl
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    Congratulations. She is lucky to have you.

    in reply to: Horse poops in water and grain bucket
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    I thought about this awhile and came up with two ideas which I have no idea will work or are feasible, but here goes. Extra buckets so there are more to poop in… maybe cannot poop in all of them in a day or maybe one will be a favorite and bedding will stay cleaner. A horse diaper like driving horses have.

    in reply to: Entertaining Houdini
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    What about a Porta-Grazer? If you haven’t heard of one, look at the website, porta-grazer.com.

    in reply to: Hamstring
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    Could you please go into detail about what you are seeing and when?

    in reply to: Bit help, please!
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    Oh, I’m sorry I misunderstood, in that case, let’s talk bits, and since you say you don’t know much about bits, I’ll tell you what I’ve learned over the years and most recently. I typed some of this in another post, but I didn’t want you to have to go hunting for it.

    The first thing to know is how much space the horse has in its mouth for a bit. If the palate (roof of mouth) is low, then one type of mouthpiece will work better than others. If the tongue is thick, then it takes up a lot of space in the mouth. If the horse has a low palate and a thick tongue, then that mouthpiece had better be thin and of a shape to not poke the horse in the roof of the mouth. Thick tongues kind of poke out, overflow, through the teeth when viewing from the side of the mouth. The palate is harder to inspect. It isn’t true that a bigger diameter means a milder bit if the horse doesn’t have the room in his mouth for it. It isn’t true that a classic one-joint nutcracker mouthpiece is mild if the palate is low. That joint might be hitting the roof of the mouth. There are ways to check the palate, but the easiest and safest in my opinion is to check when the teeth are checked by a vet or equine dentist and the mouth is held open with a speculum. My favorite bit is a Herm Sprenger Ultra KK because it is made for mouths with low palates. I figure that way, it will fit inside the mouth of any horse I’m working with. Loose rings can sometimes pinch lips, so bit guards might be in order, and one might want to order a slightly larger bit to accommodate the bit guards. Now for two more pieces of information about bits since some people get them confused (even some famous experts I won’t name)…

    A snaffle is a non-leverage bit. It has everything to do with rings, lack of shanks, and nothing to do with the mouthpiece. The mouth may be a solid rod or rubber covered rod (mullen mouth), or any other kind of mouth.

    A curb bit is a leverage bit. It has everything to do with shanks and has nothing to do with the mouthpiece.

    Both a snaffle bit and a curb bit may have a jointed mouthpiece. The jointed mouthpiece doesn’t make a bit a snaffle.

    Each side of a jointed mouthpiece is called a cannon.

    And finally, what I’ve learned in the last few years is that the rule I learned as a teenager, the “three to four wrinkles in the corners of the mouth” rule doesn’t have to be followed. What matters is the length of the horse’s mouth (viewed from the side) and where its teeth are, whether it has wolf teeth to avoid. So now I adjust the headstall without wrinkles in the mouth, check the placement of the bit in the mouth to make sure it isn’t touching teeth, and try to read the horse’s opinion of where the bit is most comfortable.

    I started this message January 14, but we lost electricity and I couldn’t get the internet back and get back to this until now.

    in reply to: Barn Sour?
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    The Parelli games and exercises would definitely help. I like to start all horses new to me, particularly rescues, with “undemanding time”. Hand graze with a 12′ or 22′ rope… just hang out like a pasture buddy, standing as close to the horse as the horse enjoys. No grooming nor petting required, it is just sharing time together where the horse gets to graze and walk around while you follow. It helps create a bond by repeating it often. Then, add mirroring, where you try to mimic what the horse is doing. If the horse is grazing with its left front hoof ahead of the right front, then stand with your left foot ahead of your right, and when the horse moves its hooves, you try to move feet the same way at the same time the horse is moving. Some horses initially freak out a little when they realize a person is matching their moves, but they get to where they accept it and maybe sort of appreciate it. There are infinite variations to the seven games, which are started on the ground with a 12′ rope, graduated to a 22′ rope, and done in the saddle as well as on the ground with no rope at all. Now, bits…

    Yes, there are eggbutt snaffles. However, the first thing to know is how much space the horse has in its mouth for a bit. If the palate (roof of mouth) is low, then one type of mouthpiece will work better than others. If the tongue is thick, then it takes up a lot of space in the mouth. If the horse has a low palate and a thick tongue, then that mouthpiece had better be thin and of a shape to not poke the horse in the roof of the mouth. Thick tongues kind of poke out, overflow, through the teeth when viewing from the side of the mouth. The palate is harder to inspect. It isn’t true that a bigger diameter means a milder bit if the horse doesn’t have the room in his mouth for it. It isn’t true that a classic one-joint nutcracker mouthpiece is mild if the palate is low. That joint might be hitting the roof of the mouth. There are ways to check the palate, but the easiest and safest in my opinion is to check when the teeth are checked by a vet or equine dentist and the mouth is held open with a speculum. My favorite bit is a Herm Sprenger Ultra KK because it is made for mouths with low palates. I figure that way, it will fit inside the mouth of any horse I’m working with. Loose rings can sometimes pinch lips, so bit guards might be in order, and one might want to order a slightly longer mouthpiece to accommodate the bit guards. Now for two more pieces of information about bits…

    A snaffle is a non-leverage bit. It has everything to do with rings, lack of shanks, and nothing to do with the mouthpiece. The mouth may be a solid rod or rubber covered rod (mullen mouth), or any other kind of mouth.

    A curb bit is a leverage bit. It has everything to do with shanks and has nothing to do with the mouthpiece.

    Both a snaffle bit and a curb bit may have a jointed mouthpiece. The jointed mouthpiece doesn’t make a bit a snaffle.

    And finally, each side of a jointed mouthpiece is called a cannon.

    in reply to: Need some advice on a healing injury
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    I would like to add one thing since it is an injury to the lower leg, a site where proud flesh is common. Wounds heal by creating granulation, but the body can go overboard with the granulation to the point that proud flesh develops… so much granulation that the edges of the wound cannot meet and close up. One can find pictures online of horrible cases of proud flesh. Unfortunately, I have personal experience with it. To help prevent that, wounds in proud flesh prone areas need to be wrapped snugly. The Telfa non-stick pads are the best to put directly on a wound. I don’t like gauze right next to the skin because it is so abrasive, and of course, Vetrap isn’t made to go directly on skin, so you are correct to not put that directly on the wound. A superficial wound that hasn’t healed in a month would concern me enough to have a vet look at it.

    in reply to: Bit help, please!
    Lizzie Lou
    Topics Started: 0Replies Posted: 14

    If I understand you correctly, your horse takes off with you sometimes, going faster than you’d like, maybe not stopping when you ask, and you are therefore thinking you need a more harsh bit to stop that behavior. Please understand that a bit will not stop a horse if it really wants to go somewhere…. no bit. To cause pain with a bit can actually make a horse more likely to “GO,” as it gets nervous rather than relaxed and it may seem like the horse is trying to run from the bit. You might get the response you need with a different bit, but you might find yourself “riding the breaks” so to speak, where you get a somewhat slow gait as long as the reins are tight. As soon as you loosen, the horse speeds up. Maybe you are already finding yourself in that situation. if not, then let’s not go there. The more we use the reins, the less we and horses use brains. Have you seen people able to ride bridleless? Even without any tack at all? It isn’t about the bit. It is about responsiveness and relaxation. It is about training. Work on circles, spirals, and one-rein stops. If you don’t know them and your horse doesn’t know them, then you need to learn them. It isn’t about controlling the mouth, it is about controlling the horse’s engine (hindquarters) and preventing the horse from rubbernecking and popping his shoulder to go where he wants to go. Please don’t get into the trap that a lot of people get into… that there is some magic piece of equipment or bit that fixes a behavior… you could spend a fortune and have a tack room full and still have one problem after another.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)