G & S

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 253 total)
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  • in reply to: Blanket or no blanket
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Is there a run-in so the horses can get out of sun on hot days and have some protection from rain on wet days?

    in reply to: Feet Going In and Out of Stirrups
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Sorry, I don’t check this website very often anymore – too much junk ads – and I did not get an alert that there was a new post.

    Think of it as stretching the whole leg, not just pushing on your heal. Sit in a chair and PUSH your heel down against the floor, with your heel lower than your toe and your leg bent at the knee as it would be in the stirrup.

    Now sitting in the same chair, lift your foot off the floor and stretch your leg down, again with your heel lower than your toe.

    The 2 feel different.

    in reply to: Endurance Saddles
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    I start a lot of beginners, and I always start them with English tack. The western saddles are much heavier, and they lock the rider in place, with is exactly what the western saddle is designed to do, as they were designed for working cows and things like that, but they do not teach the rider to balance or to feel what the horse under him/her is doing.

    Endurance can be a fun sport. I have a friend who now does primarily Endurance, with a little dressage, and she found that neither standard English nor Western saddle pads fit endurance saddles. So she now makes saddle pads specifically to fit endurance saddles. If you do decide to go for endurance saddles, contact me & I will give you her contact info.

    in reply to: Nervous Arabian – Calming Supplement
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Most of the posts talk about horses being “nervous” or “high strung”, which is fairly common when people talk about Arabians. Maybe changing the conception of the underlying problem would be a good place to begin to solve the problems. I have worked with many Arabians and have come to the conclusion that the real issue is not that they are more “nervous”, but rather that they are more aware of their surroundings and smarter than many other breeds. Things that other horses would not notice an Arabian will notice and “question”. But this means they are also more sensitive to what the rider does, which in modern times the horse tends to consider to be the “herd leader”.

    So what happens is that the horse’s attention is caught by something that is new or slightly different, and the horse wants to make sure it is not a hidden predator. and the rider reacts to the horse’s reaction by tensing. Since the rider is now the herd of one’s head horse, this can cement the horse’s belief that what ever caught his/her attention is indeed a threat, since the “head horse – AKA the rider has also noted the potential problem and has also reacted to it. The horse reacts more to the possible threat, the rider tenses more, and we have a perfect vicious cirlce.

    Solution: Rider learns to stay relaxed in spite of what the horse is doing. This lack of tension in the “head horse” tells the horse that the “head horse” is not concerned, so the possible danger is at worst highly improbable, so the horse can relax. And eventually the horse learns to trust the judgment of the his/her new “head horse” and if the rider does not tense every time the horse reacts to a change, the horse won’t either.

    If we want our horses to be sensitive enough to react to invisible cues, then we have to accept the down side of this and control our own bodies and learn to stay relaxed, which can also help us riders to flow with the horse, rather than losing our balance which puts our weight in places where it is harder for the horse to balance us.

    This is not a quick fix, but it does work.

    in reply to: Blanket washing issues HELP
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    When I bought my large capacity front loader, I specifically told the store employee that I was buying a machine to wash horse blankets and asked if the machine I was looking at was suitable for this purpose. I was told it was. Since it was a pricey washer, which I was able to purchase only because it was on sale, I tried to ask all the right questions. But I did not ask one critical question – – life expectancy. So I was quite shocked to be told by the repairman that while the machine could be repaired, it would cost almost as much as what I had paid for it. And the same thing would happen in 6 – 8 years. The OP did not say in her original post what type of washer she was using. I mentioned the short life span of these machines so that anyone reading this thread would have information I did not have when I bought my large capacity front loader and make the same mistake I did. My intent was to get info into the hands of people who might need it, not to treat any body like they were stupid, as I had been when I bought the large capacity front loader without asking every critical question.

    The only one who was stupid was me, first for not asking the right question, and then again for thinking this was important info for anyone looking to buy a washer that could handle horse blankets. Luckily, I am comfortable being stupid if my mistake can save somebody else from making the same expensive mistake I did.

    in reply to: Leather Stirrup Leathers on a Synthetic Saddle
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Can’t help you with what is legal at AQHA shows, but I can comment on using leather stirrup leathers on a synthetic saddle. The basic issue is that leather stirrups need to be treated to prevent the leather from drying out and cracking, and whatever product you use could and probably will be transferred to the saddle. Leather stirrups on a leather saddle are not a problem, but the products that will keep your leather stirrups supple can damage the material of synthetic saddles.

    in reply to: Having trouble with my horse's trot
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Are you having trouble with both the posting trot and the sitting trot? You may be too tense and trying too hard. If you relax, your body will be better able to balance itself. The other concept that is not taught enough is to feel what the horse under you is doing and match your rhythm to his. Eventually, you can learn to control his speed and trot by changing your rhythm and he can learn to follow your rhythm instead of you following his rhythm, but it has start with the rider sensing and matching the horses rhythm. If the rider’s and horse’s rhythms match it is more comfortable for both, and once the horse figures this out, he can learn to match the rider’s rhythm.

    in reply to: Feet Going In and Out of Stirrups
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Cbeck or have somebody on the ground check if you ride with your heels lower than your toes. English stirrups are designed so that if your feet are not correctly angles, and you are stretching your legs into the stirrups, your feet will not stay in the correct position. “Heals down” is still correct, however, what riders are often not told is that pushing down does not work. Stretching into the stirrups does. Not sure of the anatomical reasons for this, but stretching works, pushing down does not.

    in reply to: Blanket washing issues HELP
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    All the big non-commercial front loaders are made the same way, regardless of manufacturer. The problem is in the basic design, which is essentially the same for all. What happens is that the bearings wear out because the tub spins at a right angle to the ground, and is supported only by the bearing structures. In a and of itself this would not is not necessarily an issue, but the washers are designed so that to get to the bearings to replace them, almost the entire washer has to be disassembled, the the bearings replaced, and then reassembled. Planned obsolescence at its most insidious.

    in reply to: Blanket washing issues HELP
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    A couple things could be happening. The first one that comes to mind is that the marks may have been first hidden by the dirt, then hidden by the wetness of the washing. The material typically turns darker when it is wet and that could easily hide the marks, if they are white. It does not mean that the blanket is damaged unless the marks are also holes.

    The 2nd possibility is that your washing machine may not be big enough for the larger blankets, which are rubbing on the sides of the tub. What kind of washing machine are you using? I used one of the over-sized non-commercial front loaders for about 8 years, but I was not warned when I bought it that all of these big front loaders do the spin cycles with the tub at a right angle to the ground, and that every one of these machines is intentionally designed so that they will only last 6 – 8 years, and that is without washing anything as heavy as larger horse blankets. The washing machine makers only make money if we consumers have to replace the washing machine, so they intentionally designed these machines so that the bearings will wear out, and are so placed that it costs almost as much to replace the machine than to repair it, as the entire machine has to be disassembled to get to the bearings. Planned obsolescence at its worst. So this year I will bite the bullet and find a used commercial machine. And I would not recommend that anyone buy these machines even if only to wash their own clothes.

    As long as the white streaks do not result in holes, you should be fine. Blankets should be re-waterproofed once a year, and the best waterproofing I have found is the one Wall-Mart sells in the camping section, the one with the orange cap that costs right around $5 per can. For a 78, you will need approximately 3 cans, depending on how much of the old factory applied top layer is still intact. What destroys the top layer waterproofing is UV rays, and there is no real way to protect the blanket from UV rays, since the t/O blankets are designed for the the horse to be turned out in. But there is a 2nd part of the waterproofing, and that is the membrane that is laminated to the underside of the top layer. As long as this membrane is intact, you can replay the blankets and they will be waterproof. But the UV rays do penetrate the blanket, and will eventually cause the membrane to de-laminate, and at that point, respraying the top layer will not be enough, and your T/O becomes a stall blanket or a blanket liner.

    The blanket makers seldom release this type of info, and most horse people, even the experienced ones who have horses all their lives don’t know this. I know it because I repair horse blankets and I buy rolls of the same material the blanket makers use both for repairs, and for mini T/O’s, and the people who sell the material are a bit more forth-coming about what makes the T/O’s waterproof. Especially if one manages to ask the right questions.

    Hope this helps.

    in reply to: BUCKY
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    You probably won’t like what I am going to say, but the first thing you need to do is get rid of the draw reins. They actually make the wrong set of muscles stronger – – the horse is not correctly stretching to the bit. He is actually using his neck to get behind the bit. You don’t say whether you own, lease, or are allowed to ride this horse. This can be fixed, but it will take a rider who knows how to retrain the horse. The “super heavy on the forehand” and the lack of engagement from the back end are typical of a horse who is badly behind the bit.

    Think of it this way: the forward impulsion comes from the horse pushing himself froward from the rear end, with that energy flowing through the horses body and being caught, controlled & directed by correct use of the contact the rider has with the horse mouth through the reins. In order to do lateral movement, the rider must be able to direct the horse’s energy sideways, which is pretty much impossible if the horse is always behind the bit.

    You either need a new instructor who can teach you how to correctly put a horse on the bit, or some one who can retrain the horse, or a different horse who has already been taught to correctly work on the bit.

    in reply to: Tack Trunk Cover Help
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    What is the cover made of? Can it be machine washed in cold water?

    Is it 2 zippers that meet in the center or one extra long one?

    in reply to: Enter at "A" and die!
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Are you as a rider doing anything differently in the show ring from what you do/did in the warm up? If you are relaxed in the warm-up but tense up in the ring, & have a horse that is very sensitive to your invisible body language cues, even if the change is as subtle as as changing the amount of tension in your fingers, arms, shoulders and/or back from what you were doing in the warm up could be enough to unintentionally send her the message that you are not comfortable with what she is doing. Long term, having a horse this sensitive will be a huge advantage, but you may have to learn to wide in the show ring with a lot less tension if you have a horse with a hair trigger response to even a miniscule change in your body tension. If this is the problem, you have a horse you can ride in your finger tips, with cues that will be invisible to the naked eye.

    in reply to: Picky Drinker
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Studies have been done at Universities that offer training for animal vets who wish to specialize in horses. Originally, it was generally accepted that horses could only see in black and white, but that consensus was based on the fact that a horse’s eye structure is not identical to human eye structure. The studies proved that horses can see colors, though not necessarily the same way humans see color, and not necessarily in the range of colors we humans can see. If one stops to think about it, horses are prey animals in the animal world, so only seeing black & white could be a death sentence, if they can’t distinguish between the color of grass and trees and the color of a predator hiding in that grass or trees.

    in reply to: My sencitive (Nuts) horse
    G & S
    Topics Started: 16Replies Posted: 253

    Thanks for the update. Always nice to hear about a problem being solved.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 253 total)